U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Unread 06-13-2007, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Near Houston, TX
17 posts, read 37,290 times
Reputation: 10
Talking Compare KY, VA, TN for Real Cost

Hi! We're looking for the retirement place . Anyway, we've been focusing towards TN, but we're also interested in KY & VA. They all have beautiful wooded areas, the cost for property is very reasonable (1K-3K/acre). Looking for a place where retirees from TX aren't frowned upon. TN doesn't have state income tax and VA has a "personal property" tax. So, how does the actual cost of living compare between these 3 states ? Figuring we'll be retired and on a fixed income. Which state make more sense finacially? I've heard some folks like to live in TN and shop in VA or NC. Does anyone have any comments/info or preferances?

We're hoping to buy land within the next 12-18 months . We're wanting rural wooded land (50-100 acres) with small percentage pasture. Also seeking the proverbial spring fed pond and creek. We'd like to be within an hours drive of a "larger city" (e.g., Nashville, Knoxville, Rahleigh, Bowling Green, etc.). Does anyone know anything of the Crossville, TN area? Is land reasonably priced if you get a little ways out of town?

Well, I guess I've rambled on enough. Would love to hear other folks opinions!

Thanks!
TX2TN
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 06-13-2007, 12:26 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 3,151,204 times
Reputation: 1346
Well, I think what you might find is that anything close to a major city like Nashville, Raleigh, and Knoxville, etc is not going to be a screamin' deal, especially since you're in Houston which is actually even cheaper than it is here. You might want to look for places that have cities- meaning with hospitals, shopping, etc etc, but perhaps not as hopping and economically thriving nor attracting as many young people.None of the reasons young people are moving to these cities makes a difference to you. For that reason you might actually want to consider West Virginia. Cheap, in the mountains, and very pretty. I had an Aunt who lived there and I always enjoyed it.It isn't as economically successfull, but for that reason you'll get land and housing cheaper.Look for places that aren't as 'popular'.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 06-13-2007, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,297 posts, read 14,548,614 times
Reputation: 1555
Overall, it's slightly cheaper to live in Tennessee than Kentucky, and both of those are cheaper than Virginia. However, there's so much variation in actual locations and individual living arrangements that that can only be a general guide. I have seen some listings of cost-of-living by city compared to a national average, but I don't have a link offhand (you could probably find it by making a Google search). It would be a real research project for someone to collect and compare all the data themselves.

The reason some people here drive across state lines to shop is due to the high sales tax here. If you live close to the state border, then it make a little sense. However, with the cost of gas now, it's less so now than in the past.

You can find what you're looking for in term of farm land in Tennessee, but it would be very hard to do in some areas and stay within an hours drive of a city, or else it would be very expensive. Funny thing is I have some property in Montgomery County that sounds like just what your looking for (except for the pond); however, I'm not planning to sell it in the immediate future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 06-13-2007, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Elizabethton, TN
5,620 posts, read 2,088,061 times
Reputation: 1773
Hello, TX2TN. I think you should take a good look at Kentucky in the area south of Lexington. Somerset is in a very nice area and ranks high as a retirement destination.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 06-13-2007, 08:32 PM
 
8,771 posts, read 19,598,958 times
Reputation: 5429
Quote:
Originally Posted by TX2TN View Post
We're hoping to buy land within the next 12-18 months . We're wanting rural wooded land (50-100 acres) with small percentage pasture. Also seeking the proverbial spring fed pond and creek. We'd like to be within an hours drive of a "larger city" (e.g., Nashville, Knoxville, Rahleigh, Bowling Green, etc.). Does anyone know anything of the Crossville, TN area? Is land reasonably priced if you get a little ways out of town?
Crossville is more than an hour away from a major city. You might want to consider somewhere west of Cookeville, say in western Putnam County or around Carthage in Smith County. You'd be within an hour of Nashville, and the cost of land is still considerably less than in metro Nashville.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 06-13-2007, 10:49 PM
 
Location: White Pine, TN
111 posts, read 233,344 times
Reputation: 46
I'm still amazed at the 1-3k per acre in TN. That's like 20-30 year old prices.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 06-14-2007, 12:01 PM
 
141 posts, read 614,598 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by hilly7 View Post
I'm still amazed at the 1-3k per acre in TN. That's like 20-30 year old prices.
If you stay west of the westernmost leg of the Tennessee River, $3k/acre is do-able, at least on larger tracts.

I know of some farmland around Dyersburg that sells in the $2500-3500 range.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 07-02-2007, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Near Houston, TX
17 posts, read 37,290 times
Reputation: 10
Red face Looking For Land & A Future

Thank you all for your responses. I agree, the prices I had found periodically seems like something from the past. The area up near Onieda had a lot of reasonably priced land, but it was a little too far out (I never thought I'd say that). Hopefully, I'll make a trip up to TN this fall and see what's out there (and not on the internet). I realize the longer I wait, the higher prices are going to go but then you never know when you'll walk into the perfect deal. What can I say, I'm ever the optimist.

Anyway, with some of the TVA projects coming up, the areas between Crossville-Chattanooga-western Knoxville are beginning to look a little nicer. But I'm extremely flexible until I find the place I want to call home. The areas in Virginia, but not too far away from Kingsport, also looked interesting. But again, I was wondering the potential longer term cost differentials. The less expensive some place is, the sooner I can say good-bye to the rat race and take up the snail race......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 07-02-2007, 07:37 PM
 
Location: East Tennessee
59 posts, read 150,806 times
Reputation: 32
Anything west of Knoxville but commutable to there or Oak Ridge is generally going for $6-7K an acre on up. Asking prices run as high as $16K an acre. 5 acres or less is quite a bit higher, especially for nice property.

You are mistaken on the income tax. Contrary to what so many people say, Tennessee does indeed have an income tax -- they even call it that. They just don't tax earned income (wages), but they do tax interest and dividends, with some exceptions, and capital gains distributions from mutual funds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 07-02-2007, 08:03 PM
 
2,199 posts, read 4,659,960 times
Reputation: 1638
TreeFarm makes a good point about the TN "investment tax." It hits retirees right in the wallet, and though 15% is lower than other taxes, it takes a bite out of a fixed income.

Knoxville and Nashville real estate are actually quite pricey, compared to a lot of the South (especially TX and AR)-- they only look "cheap" if you're moving from one of the coastal regions, where real estate escalated far out of whack with income. TN has a very high sales tax and it taxes food. Property taxes are not the lowest. My auto insurance is $20 less than it was in California. My health insurance is more.

It's a wonderful place to live, but I think people have this perception of TN being very inexpensive when, it fact, it continues to become increasingly less so. Quality of life is one thing; bottom line affordability is another.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top