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Old 05-11-2010, 09:13 AM
 
4,925 posts, read 6,307,716 times
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The law quoted does state the procession can't be passed if you are on a two lane road. It does sound as if you can on a 4 lane.

My wife's family has been in our county since 1809 (we joke that she's the only one who's ever left) so she's related to everyone in the county. I've ridden in more than my share of funeral processions and it really is appreciated when people pull over. It's appreciated more than some know.

I think I posted this, but we were in one in December on the same day as the town Christmas parade. We rode by the Christmas float line-up and it was touching to see how many people still remove their hats, stop their cars, turn on their headlights, etc., when we passed.

 
Old 05-11-2010, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
447 posts, read 847,745 times
Reputation: 342
We were recently in a procession for a dear family member, and it brought tears to my eyes to see the other cars pulling over and stopping. It is the final chance to show respect to the deceased and his family. I've always been so proud of Tennesseans for doing this and think it is a shame that other places have neglected this practice. You can always tell if there is an opposing car which doesn't stop, it's usually someone from another state who either is unaware of this show of respect, or just doesn't care what we do in TN. (and, yes, i thought they were jerks for ignoring everyone else on the roadway)
 
Old 05-11-2010, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
731 posts, read 1,517,303 times
Reputation: 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnn5 View Post
We were recently in a procession for a dear family member, and it brought tears to my eyes to see the other cars pulling over and stopping. It is the final chance to show respect to the deceased and his family. I've always been so proud of Tennesseans for doing this and think it is a shame that other places have neglected this practice. You can always tell if there is an opposing car which doesn't stop, it's usually someone from another state who either is unaware of this show of respect, or just doesn't care what we do in TN. (and, yes, i thought they were jerks for ignoring everyone else on the roadway)
Ditto. So far I've seen all my grandparents, 2 aunts, 2 uncles, a brother and my father buried. In each processional it was a great comfort to see that others took just a small amount of time out of their day to show respect for the deceased and a moment of empathy for those of us left behind. I understand this custom must seem strange and time consuming to those not from here, but please try and remember that in every hearse lies someone's mother, father, son, daughter, brother, sister and/or spouse and the ones who loved them most are going through the horrible experience of accompanying them on their final journey. It wouldn't kill anyone to take 5 minutes to stop and say a quick prayer of comfort for the family.
 
Old 05-11-2010, 06:56 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
26 posts, read 28,627 times
Reputation: 38
Same here on the west end of the state. Folks pull over, even on 4 lane on the opposite side. Men normally remove their hats and place them over their hearts. You can see the appreciation, as the familie's nod and wave as they go by....We also pull over for any emergency vehicle.
 
Old 05-12-2010, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Seymour TN
1,442 posts, read 3,188,902 times
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Thanks all. I have not yet encountered a funeral procession on an interstate, just local roads. Since it says you're prohibited to pass, I assume you'd get a ticket for it. I'm on board with Labart. I'm sorry that I don't have the time or enough "respect" to pull over - actually STOP - for a funeral procession. That is the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen. If I was the dead person being carted off, I would not ever expect or WANT strangers to stop and take their hats off. I'd want them to continue driving considerately....something the funeral processions DON'T DO! They are always in the fast lane! It actually says they should be in the right lane! Just more ignorance! People here just do what the f*** they want and don't care about anyone else.

I am a considerate person who ALWAYS thinks about others on the road and everywhere else. This funeral thing is an example of upbringing I suppose, a person is not bad or a sinner or disrespectful for not pulling over. We all show respect in different ways. It is arrogant and rude to demand respect. I really don't understand taking off your hat for the national anthem, either. How dare someone say I am not respectful!
 
Old 05-12-2010, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Left Coast - Not Where I Want To Be
1,157 posts, read 2,831,971 times
Reputation: 656
If you pull over for a funeral procession in California, you'll be on the receiving end of dirty looks, obscene hand gestures, horns sounding, and possibly even being hit by another vehicle. Once I retire in Tennessee, I'll be happy to pull over for funeral processions.
 
Old 05-12-2010, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
11,476 posts, read 11,444,777 times
Reputation: 11728
Quote:
I'm sorry that I don't have the time or enough "respect" to pull over - actually STOP - for a funeral procession. That is the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen. If I was the dead person being carted off, I would not ever expect or WANT strangers to stop and take their hats off. I'd want them to continue driving considerately....something the funeral processions DON'T DO! They are always in the fast lane! It actually says they should be in the right lane! Just more ignorance! People here just do what the f*** they want and don't care about anyone else.
Thus the frustration behind this:

Quote:
People in Knoxville are a bit more respectful than in other counties (where you will hear 'go home Yankee')
You dont agree with long held traditions so you call locals ridiculous, and ignorant
Quote:
I must warn you there is a lot of ignorance here


I suggest that if having enough respect to follow long standing traditions of a state is too much for you to swallow pack up and go back to NJ or FL where people arent, as you claimTennesseans are, ridiculous, ignorant and lazy.
 
Old 05-12-2010, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Kenai Peninsula, AK
5,568 posts, read 9,357,175 times
Reputation: 2006
Quote:
I'm sorry that I don't have the time or enough "respect" to pull over - actually STOP - for a funeral procession. That is the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen.
I'm sorry that we might not like you or welcome you here, then. This is one of our traditions and belittling it on a forum of local folks isn't gonna go down well, hon. Really, take a breath, slow down, look around you. Enjoy this for what it is. Evidently you LIKE it here, or else you wouldn't be living here. Why do you want to move in, then call things ignorant and change them???

Quote:
It is arrogant and rude to demand respect.
Yes it is, and anyone worth a damn won't want any respect that isn't given freely. However, it is as equally arrogant to disrespect others by not observing their customs, when in their territory. You wouldn't do it to a Navajo, why would you do it to a Southerner?
 
Old 05-12-2010, 02:14 PM
 
2,065 posts, read 3,347,754 times
Reputation: 2555
I cringed when I read that screech of a speech this morning and avoided responding so I would not say something equally as obnoxious. Maybe this is the prime example of why I like it here and don't miss NY, and why no one has used the word Yankee as a curse word in my presence.

My first introduction to the giving respect this way was while traveling on Alcoa Highway with a neighbor, a wonderful southern lady, who as a former military wife knew I might not know the custom. She saw the procession approaching me and gave me the expected options. Fully 3/4 of the people slowed to a crawl, on the opposite side (where we were) and many pulled over on the same side. This is the "death highway" to many because everyone seems in a rush and needs to go high speed all the time. It cost me all of 30 seconds, if that much, to slow and pull to the right. I never got to stop fully because the procession passed by too quickly. Even in my biggest ever rushes 30 seconds does not hurt to behave in a manner that is the custom where I am. What on earth could be so important that 30 seconds is considered an imposition?
 
Old 05-12-2010, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
11,476 posts, read 11,444,777 times
Reputation: 11728
Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
I cringed when I read that screech of a speech this morning and avoided responding so I would not say something equally as obnoxious. Maybe this is the prime example of why I like it here and don't miss NY, and why no one has used the word Yankee as a curse word in my presence.

My first introduction to the giving respect this way was while traveling on Alcoa Highway with a neighbor, a wonderful southern lady, who as a former military wife knew I might not know the custom. She saw the procession approaching me and gave me the expected options. Fully 3/4 of the people slowed to a crawl, on the opposite side (where we were) and many pulled over on the same side. This is the "death highway" to many because everyone seems in a rush and needs to go high speed all the time. It cost me all of 30 seconds, if that much, to slow and pull to the right. I never got to stop fully because the procession passed by too quickly. Even in my biggest ever rushes 30 seconds does not hurt to behave in a manner that is the custom where I am. What on earth could be so important that 30 seconds is considered an imposition?
Exactly. That is another thing about Southerners, we dont get in a real big hurry! Life moves a bit slower and we take time acknowledge others.

OT, but your post reminded me of my sis when she visited from OH. She was confused and somewhat concerned that several cars had flashed their headlights at her while driving. I explained that it was a warning that the police were sitting ahead watching for speeders. Just another act of consideration.
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