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Old 06-25-2011, 03:50 AM
 
13,222 posts, read 12,633,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
You can quite easily have a culture shock from being in an area with a lot of trees. True story, my old teacher in born, raised, and taught in Killeen said he went to Lamar U in Beaumont. He felt trapped and a little claustrophobic and a place very different from Killeen. Because Killeen and most of Texas is not as lush as southeast Texas. So he transferred to Angelo State in San Angelo. A place more similar to Killeen.
This is exactly what I meant.

 
Old 06-25-2011, 03:51 AM
 
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I just finished watching True Grit. It reminded me of this thread.
 
Old 06-25-2011, 08:38 AM
 
Location: At the Root
717 posts, read 157,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
You can quite easily have a culture shock from being in an area with a lot of trees. True story, my old teacher in born, raised, and taught in Killeen said he went to Lamar U in Beaumont. He felt trapped and a little claustrophobic and a place very different from Killeen. Because Killeen and most of Texas is not as lush as southeast Texas. So he transferred to Angelo State in San Angelo. A place more similar to Killeen.
I understand that, but that has nothing to do with culture.

I used to go to Lamar as well, and no part of that campus is heavily wooded. There are a lot of big trees, but nothing that would give you that trapped effect. Maybe they were referring to other parts of Beaumont that were heavily wooded.

Southeast Texas is way different from Central Texas, no doubt. So it's definitely understandable that someone would become overwhelmed by the change. You go from a hilly, dry, scrubby, kinda western part of Texas to a flat, humid, lush, very southern part of the state.
 
Old 06-25-2011, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,832 posts, read 18,920,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
You can quite easily have a culture shock from being in an area with a lot of trees. True story, my old teacher in born, raised, and taught in Killeen said he went to Lamar U in Beaumont. He felt trapped and a little claustrophobic and a place very different from Killeen. Because Killeen and most of Texas is not as lush as southeast Texas. So he transferred to Angelo State in San Angelo. A place more similar to Killeen.
Haha, right. I wouldn't call it culture shock, but those of us from central parts of Texas aren't use to such heavy tree coverage; especially tall trees.
 
Old 06-25-2011, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
13,275 posts, read 14,027,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chalie Brown View Post
I understand that, but that has nothing to do with culture.

I used to go to Lamar as well, and no part of that campus is heavily wooded. There are a lot of big trees, but nothing that would give you that trapped effect. Maybe they were referring to other parts of Beaumont that were heavily wooded.

Southeast Texas is way different from Central Texas, no doubt. So it's definitely understandable that someone would become overwhelmed by the change. You go from a hilly, dry, scrubby, kinda western part of Texas to a flat, humid, lush, very southern part of the state.
How does It not have something to do with culture. Geography and topography plays a huge role in culture. Also the fact that Lamar is not in an area that is heavily wooded means less than just the immediate campus itself. You not only enjoy the school, you enjoy the town as well.
 
Old 06-25-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: At the Root
717 posts, read 157,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
How does It not have something to do with culture. Geography and topography plays a huge role in culture. Also the fact that Lamar is not in an area that is heavily wooded means less than just the immediate campus itself. You not only enjoy the school, you enjoy the town as well.
Culture shock is in reference to the accents and behaviors of the people in a specific area. Pine forests have nothing to do with that. Now if you want to say that they experienced scenery or environment "shock" then that makes sense. Understand?
 
Old 06-25-2011, 12:58 PM
 
13,222 posts, read 12,633,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chalie Brown View Post
Culture shock is in reference to the accents and behaviors of the people in a specific area. Pine forests have nothing to do with that. Now if you want to say that they experienced scenery or environment "shock" then that makes sense. Understand?
The culture is different in NC than I experienced in Austin. Some guy told me how much he hates Mexicans on the 1st day I was there.
 
Old 06-25-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: At the Root
717 posts, read 157,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
The culture is different in NC than I experienced in Austin. Some guy told me how much he hates Mexicans on the 1st day I was there.
I didn't say you don't experience a culture shock between the two areas. I said trees have nothing to do with culture.

There ain't plenty of texans who hate Mexicans?
 
Old 06-25-2011, 01:46 PM
 
13,222 posts, read 12,633,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chalie Brown View Post
I didn't say you don't experience a culture shock between the two areas. I said trees have nothing to do with culture.

There ain't plenty of texans who hate Mexicans?
It's more out in the open out here. In Texas, not so much, as alot of Texan culture is derived from Mexican culture.
 
Old 06-25-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: At the Root
717 posts, read 157,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
It's more out in the open out here. In Texas, not so much, as alot of Texan culture is derived from Mexican culture.
I guess it depends on which part of Texas you stay at. Where I'm used to, people (especially black) have no reservations about expressing their dislike for mexicans (namely the illegal aliens).

The only part of Mexican culture I'm familiar with is Taco Sundays.
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