U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 07-31-2010, 07:47 AM
 
4 posts, read 14,858 times
Reputation: 14

Advertisements

Are there areas of Texas, other than the coast that don't have problems with a water shortage?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-31-2010, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
15,088 posts, read 23,627,028 times
Reputation: 6975
It seems likely that the areas of Texas which get the most rainfall, and/or are downstream of those areas are the least likely to be affected by drought. So East Texas and the Toledo Bend area are good bets. Keep in mind that water shortages in cities are often the result of lack of water treatment facilities, even when abundant water is available for crops.

http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printab...precip_tx3.pdf

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2010, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 21,255,734 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Critical-Blinker View Post
Are there areas of Texas, other than the coast that don't have problems with a water shortage?
I think anything east of 35 will be fine, but anyone west of it is going to have isses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2010, 07:40 PM
 
15,303 posts, read 29,956,133 times
Reputation: 5538
so half of San Antonio and Austin will have problems but not the other???

to my mind anything west of Tyler is really going to be in world of hurt
FTW right now is trying to buy water from Oklahoma and is having no luck
the state has built three large lakes in past 20 yrs trying to get ready for projected growth and they already fall behind in projected water needs ...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2010, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 21,255,734 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
so half of San Antonio and Austin will have problems but not the other???

to my mind anything west of Tyler is really going to be in world of hurt
FTW right now is trying to buy water from Oklahoma and is having no luck
the state has built three large lakes in past 20 yrs trying to get ready for projected growth and they already fall behind in projected water needs ...
Stop being simple. When I say anything west of 35; it doesn't mean there will be water loss as soon as you cross 35W.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2010, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
6,928 posts, read 11,578,495 times
Reputation: 3036
The Edwards Aquifer is west of I-35, and it's one of the largest aquifers in the world. Austin and San Antonio sit along it. Currently, something like only 5-10% of the water in it is accessible... and of that accessible water, only a fraction is used. But if all the water down there was taken into account (granted, reaching it all would be prohibitively expensive right now), it could provide water to the current 2 million residents using it for something like 200-300 years. That's if it never rained a single drop again.

And even though Austin is on the NE end of this huge aquifer, we don't even use it for our water. San Antonio does, but Austin doesn't. We just play in some of the spring fed pools the aquifer provides . So with all the recent growth Austin's had -- the city still gets all the water it needs from surface reservoirs (lakes) along the Colorado river, which seems to work fine even during the heavy droughts like the last 2 years.

Of course, conservation is always necessary because of our current limited facilities to get water; and it's a good idea in general. But long term, I don't see any problem with water in Central Texas, even areas well west of I-35.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2015, 06:34 AM
 
2 posts, read 497 times
Reputation: 10
Corpus Christi and surrounding areas have been under constant water restrictions for almost 8 months with no lift of restrictions in sight.

Water scarcity affects the entire state of Texas, and is not going to get better unless we change our water management and consumption practices. Sadly, this will fall back on private citizens before it affects big Ag.

There are things that we can do...for instance water recycling. Household grey water recycling (all household wastewater except toilet and kitchen) can be recycled for outdoor irrigation and outdoor purposes. Currently the U.S. consumes 9 billion gallons of water per day to water our lawns! [EPA] Think of how much water we could save if we used recycled water for this purpose. Remember - Every gallon of water recycled is a gallon of water saved!

Please watch the video below (copy and paste link)
youtu.be/HQOGt0xxakQ

Last edited by kristine.lilly; 04-08-2015 at 06:35 AM.. Reason: fix URL
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2015, 10:49 AM
Status: "May is here. Summer is near." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: North Texas
737 posts, read 98,158 times
Reputation: 496
What about Alaska? Not just for Texas but even California, etc. I know they ship water to India, why not the rest of the States? According to Wikipedia, they have 3,197 official named natural lakes and over 3,000,000 unnamed natural lakes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2015, 12:15 AM
 
Location: H-town, TX.
2,294 posts, read 2,811,963 times
Reputation: 1216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Duck View Post
What about Alaska? Not just for Texas but even California, etc. I know they ship water to India, why not the rest of the States? According to Wikipedia, they have 3,197 official named natural lakes and over 3,000,000 unnamed natural lakes.

This is typical India (no, I don't "like to travel" nor do I want to "learn about other cultures"):












Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $94,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2015, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top