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Old 01-09-2011, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Houston
10,684 posts, read 12,398,252 times
Reputation: 7214

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Is Texas like that stereotype? Parts of it are, but certainly not all of it. I certainly would not put Austin, Dallas (or even Fort Worth), San Antonio, or Houston in that boat because they are nothing like that.

The best thing I can say is that unlike California, in Texas people in the large cities think extremely different from people in the rural areas.
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Old 01-09-2011, 09:00 AM
Status: "Save a life! Be a bone marrow donor!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Central Texas
17,037 posts, read 25,123,326 times
Reputation: 13977
Quote:
Originally Posted by justme02 View Post
Is Texas like that stereotype? Parts of it are, but certainly not all of it. I certainly would not put Austin, Dallas (or even Fort Worth), San Antonio, or Houston in that boat because they are nothing like that.

The best thing I can say is that unlike California, in Texas people in the large cities think extremely different from people in the rural areas.
How many rural areas have you lived in, justme02? Because this does not fit in with the people that I've known in rural areas and I've lived in cities, small towns, and rural areas in Texas over the course of my life.

This statement, itself, common as it is, is a form of stereotyping.
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
5,395 posts, read 4,036,935 times
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I'd be willing to bet television & the Internet have brought most rural areas out of their isolation so they aren't nearly as provincial as urbanites might think.

They aren't all "Cousin Eddies"
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,512 posts, read 18,281,853 times
Reputation: 7306
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
How many rural areas have you lived in, justme02? Because this does not fit in with the people that I've known in rural areas and I've lived in cities, small towns, and rural areas in Texas over the course of my life.

This statement, itself, common as it is, is a form of stereotyping.
the answer is none. he is definitely going by stereotype being a none native
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,845 posts, read 21,519,326 times
Reputation: 6748
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
How many rural areas have you lived in, justme02? Because this does not fit in with the people that I've known in rural areas and I've lived in cities, small towns, and rural areas in Texas over the course of my life.

This statement, itself, common as it is, is a form of stereotyping.
That's a huge misconception on City Data.

It's always "People in the major cities aren't like that, but everyone else is". I grew up in Waco and use to always hang out in rural areas around central Texas and I knew no one like that. Please give us more credit than that and stop trying to reinforce those same stereotypes on us that are forced on the bigger cities in Texas.
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Central Austin
2,515 posts, read 4,300,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
That's a huge misconception on City Data.

It's always "People in the major cities aren't like that, but everyone else is". I grew up in Waco and use to always hang out in rural areas around central Texas and I knew no one like that. Please give us more credit than that and stop trying to reinforce those same stereotypes on us that are forced on the bigger cities in Texas.
I kind of like people being ignorant of Texas outside the major metros. It gives me the option of playing the stereotypes to my advantage.
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:56 AM
Status: "Save a life! Be a bone marrow donor!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Central Texas
17,037 posts, read 25,123,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
I kind of like people being ignorant of Texas outside the major metros. It gives me the option of playing the stereotypes to my advantage.
This is true. There's many a person who's stereotyped someone as ignorant or not very smart because of where they're from or what their accent is only to find out their error too late and to their regret.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,845 posts, read 21,519,326 times
Reputation: 6748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
I kind of like people being ignorant of Texas outside the major metros. It gives me the option of playing the stereotypes to my advantage.
Haha, yeah it's fun when outsiders think that way, but it just annoys me when Texans try and stereotype other Texas cities.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
5,395 posts, read 4,036,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Haha, yeah it's fun when outsiders think that way, but it just annoys me when Texans try and stereotype other Texas cities.
Especially the flamewars betweeen Dallasites & Houstonians
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:27 AM
 
10,064 posts, read 12,219,315 times
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On the accent thing, I have always wondered what it is about a Texas/Southern accent that -- in the minds of many in other parts of the country -- marks one as backward and ignorant?

*laughing a bit* I have a distant cousin/good friend from Mississippi by way of North Alabama, and she is as educated as they come. BUT...she told me once that when she opens her mouth among some northerners, "my percieved IQ plummets 20 points!"

Anyway, I recall some years ago there was a program on PBS called "American Tongues" and that topic came up. Molly Ivans (a native Texan whom some of you probably remember) was interviewed and she said something about it getting started during the WWII era with the movies. There was always some bubba Texas/Southern boy who talked slow and appeared dim-witted. And then of course there was the Beverly Hillbillies and such.

Another "theory" is that this part of the country has been traditionally rural (up until 1960 or so, most Texans lived in rural areas and small towns). Thus, in the minds of many in the urban areas of the northeast and such, there was a tendency to think of "country-bumkins".

I don't know...but the topic is a contemplative one...
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