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Old 11-17-2011, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
14,296 posts, read 19,850,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
Brady. More precisely, about 20 miles north of Brady on Hwy 377. Brady, however, calls itself the Heart of Texas and geographically is the largest population centre closest to the geographical centre of the state. It always impressed me as a nice, small cowboy town that I used to drive through between Austin and Lubbock or Austin and San Angelo.
You are correct. Your turn doctorjef.

Geography of Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The geographic center of Texas is about 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Brady in northern McCulloch County.

• The highway marker is on US 377, 20 miles north of Brady (Heart of Texas Park, near the state's geographical center; 5 counties visible from observation deck) at the Heart of Texas Roadside Park. 31 23' 18.15" N 99 10' 14.69" W

Quote:
This is the monument for the Geographic Center of Texas. Looking east from this monument it is 341 miles to the easternmost point in Texas along the Louisiana border. The text of the monument says:
Five miles northwest is the geographic center of Texas, an imaginary point whose coordinates divide the state into four equal areas. In straight-line distance it is 437 miles from the state's most westerly point on the Rio Grande River above El Paso, 412 miles from the most northerly point in the northwest corner of the Panhandle near Texline, 401 miles from the most southerly point on the Rio Grande below Brownsville and 341 miles from the most easterly point on the Sabine River near Burkeville. Maximum border-to-border distance is 801 miles from north to south and 773 miles from east to west. Enclosed within the 4,137-mile perimeter of the state are 267,339 square miles or 7.4 per cent of the nation's total area. Fifteen of the 50 states could be readily accommodated within Texas' borders--with more than 1,000 square miles left over. Brewster, in southwest Texas, is the largest of the state's 254 counties with 6,208 square miles, an area larger than the state of Connecticut. Smallest county is Rockwall in northeast Texas with 147 square miles. Texas elevations rise from sea level along the 624-mile coast of the Gulf of Mexico to 8,751 feet atop Guadalupe Peak in the Guadalupe Mountains. Altitude at this point is 1,545 feet. Terrain varies from the subtropic Rio Grande Valley to the trackless Great Plains, from the lush forests of East Texas to the rugged Trans-Pecos region where mountain ranges thrust 90 peaks a mile or more into the sky. But perhaps nowhere are Texas contrasts more pronounced than in average annual rainfall: from more than 56 inches along the Sabine River, nearly as much as Miami's, to less than 8 inches in the extreme West, as little as Phoenix's.
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Old 11-18-2011, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,614 posts, read 6,122,939 times
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This legendary but possibly factual Texas figure was named for a famous character that appears in the stories of early American writer Washington Irving. Why was this figure so dubbed and for what did s/he become famous?

Hint: as a boy the story of this figure was related to me in all seriousness as absolutely factual and I think many people assume it so to be, though others have always considered the claim to fame to be based on a hoax.
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Old 11-18-2011, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
2,463 posts, read 2,351,772 times
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An interesting aside - and perhaps it'll lead to an answer:

IRIVING, TEXAS
Quote:
Irving was founded in 1903 by J.O. "Otto" Schulze and Otis Brown. It is believed that literary author Washington Irving was a favorite of Netta Barcus Brown, and consequently the name of the townsite, Irving, was chosen. Irving originally began in 1889 as an area called Gorbit, and in 1894 the name changed to Kit. Irving was incorporated April 14, 1914, with Otis Brown as the first mayor.
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Old 11-18-2011, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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I'm afraid that's a red herring, or at least I can't see how it relates to the trivium I have in mind. Remember, the figure in question was named for one of the well-known characters in the stories of Washington Irving.

I'm not sure this bit of trivia is as well known today as it was to my parent's generation (they were young children when the legendary event took place, and of course my grandparent's generation were adults who undoubtedly read about the amazing event and figure in question). I'd imagine, however, that the event and figure are still well-known to people living in the countyseat (hint, hint) where the events took place.
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
2,463 posts, read 2,351,772 times
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Okay, I think I have it. Once I quit trying various names of characters in Irving's short stories and tales, and went with the un-named "headless horseman," the rest came easy.

The Texas folk tale involves two Texas Rangers in 1850 - a man by the name of Taylor and the famous "Big Foot" Wallace. Cattle rustlers made the mistake of stealing Taylor's cattle and when hunted down, the leader, a man named Vidal, was subsequently beheaded by Big Foot. Legend has it the body was set upon a horse with the head hanging from the pommel of the saddle, and the horse roamed the countryside for a long time before others finally captured the horse and relieved it of its macabre burden.

Ever since the "headless horseman" of south Texas has been reported on numerous occasions and said to still wander the countryside in that area.

YIKES!

re: Creed Taylor and William Alexander Anderson "Big Foot" Wallace
Also: El Muerto - Legend of the Headless Horseman
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,743 posts, read 36,788,871 times
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A few other little-known facts about Irving. None of his fictional characters were created in books written under the name Washington Irving. They were all published under a pen-name, usually Geoffrey Crayon. Only his later works of history and biography were published using Irving's real name.

Irving may be the only author whose picture ever appeared on money in the USA. Before the government got into the money business, his likeness was on banknotes issued by Irving Trust, a company named after him.

http://p2.la-img.com/702/13132/3848742_1_l.jpg

There was no uniform US paper currency backed by the government until 1861

Last edited by jtur88; 11-18-2011 at 05:47 PM..
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
2,463 posts, read 2,351,772 times
Reputation: 1749
Here's my next contribution to this thread. Once again I'm attaching photos of the subject, which obviously show a sculptor with his work in progress. The question is:

WHAT WAS THE ORIGINAL NAME OF THE SCULPTURE, THE CURRENT NAME, AND WHY WAS IT CHANGED.

Bonus Points for:

Present location of the sculpture.
Name of the sculptor.
Length of time (approx) from conception to dedication on site.


Last edited by joqua; 11-28-2011 at 07:35 AM..
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Old 11-18-2011, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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"Juan de Onate y Salazar", by John Houser, renamed "Equestrian" because Acoma Indians protested the commemoration of a cruel Conquistador, so the name was changed to make the horseman anonymous.

It's in the El Paso airport. I think work went on from about 1988 to 2007.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,614 posts, read 6,122,939 times
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WTF?? Do you know the rules of this game? No one has correctly answered my question and I'm not ready to give out another clue. No, nothing to do with the headless horseman.

The figure, given a name inspired by a character in Washington Irving's fiction, and the putative event that inspired the name, involved specifically events that occurred in a Texas county seat during the 1920's. The story became particularly legendary in Texas but was reported nationally at the time.

If no one figures this out by the end of the weekend, I'll issue some new hints. My guess is that TexasReb would know about the matter in question -- maybe he'll check in.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,743 posts, read 36,788,871 times
Reputation: 28656
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
WTF?? Do you know the rules of this game? No one has correctly answered my question and I'm not ready to give out another clue. No, nothing to do with the headless horseman.

The figure, given a name inspired by a character in Washington Irving's fiction, and the putative event that inspired the name, involved specifically events that occurred in a Texas county seat during the 1920's. The story became particularly legendary in Texas but was reported nationally at the time.

If no one figures this out by the end of the weekend, I'll issue some new hints. My guess is that TexasReb would know about the matter in question -- maybe he'll check in.
Joqua gave a complete and correct answer to the question exactly as posed. The fact that you had another answer in mind does not make Joqua's answer wrong.

Might have to call on CaptRN to referee this one.
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