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Old 04-18-2011, 10:58 PM
 
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I understand under certain circumstances a minor can get a driver's license at age 14. I can't find any information on the DPS website, maybe someone here knows something?

I understand sometimes a 14-year old can get a restricted DL under certain circumstances. The license is highly restricted---can't go over 30 MPH, only to certain places, like school, doctor, grocery store, no other minors in the car, only during the day, etc.

The driver must be a straight arrow---my dd is. she's a straight A student, never in any type of trouble, responsible, etc. the reason is---I'm disabled, find it very difficult to drive, and there's been situations that have almost been an emergency. We always manage somehow, but it would be a good backup if she could drive only if we had no other option.

So, is this something they even do in Texas? I've heard about it, but in other states.
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Old 04-18-2011, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Central Austin
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It sounds like you could qualify for what's called a "hardship license." I've had a couple of friends who had them.
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Old 04-18-2011, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Plano, TX
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If Rick Perry was able to do it, you should be, too.

Governor's daughter gets hardship license | Amarillo.com | Amarillo Globe-News
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Old 04-19-2011, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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A hardship license provision was retained when the ordinary age for getting a TDL was raised from 14 to 16 back in the 1960s. I have a cousin a year my senior who either just slipped under the wire or whose daddy was able to get her qualified for a hardship license in a small West Texas town (Kermit), probably because of who he knew. Going through high school in Lubbock I never knew or heard of anyone who was licensed to drive at 14. If such licenses are still issued they are rare as hens teeth and no doubt very hard to obtain. I wouldn't count on being able to get one, but it might also depend on where you live. Being in a small, isolated place in a very rural part of the State might help.

Just read the piece from 2002 about Perry's daughter. If that's not corruption and special treatment/favoritism, I don't know what is. The article seems to suggest that the hardship age may have been raised to 15 and also be contingent on having completed drivers ed, although the paper may not have got all their facts straight.
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Old 04-19-2011, 07:56 AM
 
576 posts, read 759,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
Just read the piece from 2002 about Perry's daughter. If that's not corruption and special treatment/favoritism, I don't know what is. The article seems to suggest that the hardship age may have been raised to 15 and also be contingent on having completed drivers ed, although the paper may not have got all their facts straight.
From the article:

Quote:
after her mother indicated the first family faces "unusual economic hardship."

Perry draws a $115,345 annual salary and has DPS officers at his disposal for transportation purposes.

The DPS must find that failure to grant the license "will result in an unusual economic hardship for the family of the applicant."
You have got to be kidding me?? What economic hardship? Let's see:
  1. They live in State paid for housing and much better than any other welfare recipient out there.
  2. The Guv gets chauffeured around whenever desired by a State paid for driver (State police or other).
  3. The Guv is given all types of allowances for one thing or another.
  4. They have a staff to maintain the home, cook meals, etc.
  5. I would fully expect the Guv can call the State Police for chauffeur duties for family members if he feels they need to be protected for any reason.
  6. Last but not least he is drawing $115K a year salary. How many low income people can live on what he draws?
If it is such an economic hardship then maybe Mommy Dearest should get her behind out and work a job?? I'm sure she can find someone willing to hire her just for bragging rights and window dressing even if she has no skills?
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Old 04-19-2011, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
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I'm aware of kids getting them at 15, but not sure about 14. I have a nephew in Fort Worth who is 15, and has been told by whomever approves these things he could qualify for one, but SIL doesn't think he is responsible enough and instead has put the burden of getting this kid where he needs to be off on extended family, friends and even casual acquaintances. I would definitely check with the DPS or at least a driving school.
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Old 04-19-2011, 02:17 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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Here's the info about it on the DPS website: TxDPS - Apply for Driver License/ID card Scroll down to the Under 18 Drivers section and you'll find it.
Here's the application form: http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/Interne...orms/DL-77.pdf

It says the driver must be at least 15 and must renew the license every 60 days or take driver's ed, in which case the license will renew annually.

Have you called your insurance company to see what they'll charge for adding your daughter? If it's as much as adding a normal teenager and you only need transportation occasionally, a cab might be more affordable.
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Old 04-19-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
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Just to gloat... In the early 60's, in Abilene, we could take Driver's Ed at school. Any student had to be at least 14, so we we're all in the 9th grade.

A few weeks of course work and we could take the state written test. Then a prescribed number of hours driving, three students to a car, alternating. My class had a Pontiac Tempest with a four speed stick on the floor, the teacher, Mr. Cook, had a break pedal on the passenger side and cough medicine in the glove box.

I took my driving test the last week in November. Fully qualified as a driver, no restrictions and covered on dad's State Farm policy.
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Old 04-19-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Central Austin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
It sounds like you could qualify for what's called a "hardship license." I've had a couple of friends who had them.
To expound on this, both of them had a parent (in one case, the only) that had a disability and were the oldest child. They got a hardship license to so they could get to school and drive their siblings around.
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Old 04-19-2011, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,069 posts, read 5,796,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
Here's the info about it on the DPS website: TxDPS - Apply for Driver License/ID card Scroll down to the Under 18 Drivers section and you'll find it.
Here's the application form: http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/Interne...orms/DL-77.pdf

It says the driver must be at least 15 and must renew the license every 60 days or take driver's ed, in which case the license will renew annually.

Have you called your insurance company to see what they'll charge for adding your daughter? If it's as much as adding a normal teenager and you only need transportation occasionally, a cab might be more affordable.
.
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