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Old 04-21-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
12,914 posts, read 13,315,411 times
Reputation: 8045

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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
So far, I'm not sensing much cause for optimism from these posts. My supposition is that much of the recent intensity of American politics comes from the tremendous financial insecurity that so many people have been experiencing, and that to the extent the economy and employment levels improve this insecurity will decrease, hence only a much reduced fringe of social activists will continue the shrill rhetoric over the usual suspects (abortion, issues revolving around social integration of homosexual persons, etc). I would think that shrillness over immigration issues would decrease, as I see that significantly fueled by economic insecurities and not a core part of the social conservative agenda (nor the liberal agenda for that matter). Perhaps that's all wishful thinking on my part.

I guess another thing I'm obliquely asking is whether the intensity of political rhetoric in Texas is likely to decrease once Perry is out of office, though I guess that won't be before 2014, so not really a part of the upcoming election cycle.
I may not be in the mainstream on this, but I don't think the rhetoric in Texas is as intense as you describe. It certainly is with Rick Perry and those that oppose him. Perry is a divisive figure and bombastic. That inflames the other side. But the typical Texas resident, whether they are inherently Democrat or Republican is not as fired up as some think.

I think national politics is very divisive today. The people I interact with regularly (family, coworkers, and friends) are more polarized on national issues than Texas issues.

It is just a guess, but I think Perry will finally wear out his support this term. I think many Texans would like a more sensible Republican. But who is that?
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,981,668 times
Reputation: 6685
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
I may not be in the mainstream on this, but I don't think the rhetoric in Texas is as intense as you describe. It certainly is with Rick Perry and those that oppose him. Perry is a divisive figure and bombastic. That inflames the other side. But the typical Texas resident, whether they are inherently Democrat or Republican is not as fired up as some think.

I think national politics is very divisive today. The people I interact with regularly (family, coworkers, and friends) are more polarized on national issues than Texas issues.

It is just a guess, but I think Perry will finally wear out his support this term. I think many Texans would like a more sensible Republican. But who is that?
This.

People don't realize Texas in general just has a low voter turnout and we end up with these over the top politicians. However, they do not represent or speak for the general population of Texas.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:05 AM
 
995 posts, read 1,039,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
This.

People don't realize Texas in general just has a low voter turnout and we end up with these over the top politicians. However, they do not represent or speak for the general population of Texas.
Very true. Well spoken
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,645 posts, read 6,445,194 times
Reputation: 2365
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
I may not be in the mainstream on this, but I don't think the rhetoric in Texas is as intense as you describe. It certainly is with Rick Perry and those that oppose him. Perry is a divisive figure and bombastic. That inflames the other side. But the typical Texas resident, whether they are inherently Democrat or Republican is not as fired up as some think.

I think national politics is very divisive today. The people I interact with regularly (family, coworkers, and friends) are more polarized on national issues than Texas issues.

It is just a guess, but I think Perry will finally wear out his support this term. I think many Texans would like a more sensible Republican. But who is that?
Probably I should have been more specific, but I was in fact talking about the politicians. Perry would be the most obvious example but there are still people around like Warren Chisum (I know, he's been around forever) and members of the Texas Board of Education (Yes, I know the adoption of textbooks in Texas has been a circus for about as long as I can recall). Still, it seems there are quite a few loudmouths in the Texas legislature these days, and of course some members of the Texas congressional delegation in recent years have been very mean, ugly characters -- some got their comeuppance, of course. Still, my perception of the level of rhetoric was generally that the volume was lower during the governorship of GW Bush; not to mention Mark White and even Bill Clemmons - who became a virtual hermit during his second term. I realise that Ann Richards offended the sensibilities of conservative Republicans and I can't really comment on her level of rhetoric as governor (not as keynote speaker at the Dem Convention, a purely partisan gig in which she would fairly be expected to engage in strong and scathing rhetoric), as I was a big fan of her administration and at this remove in history can no longer be objective about her performance. Anyway, I wasn't talking so much about the citizenry as the political class.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: 75025 (previously 75254, 90505, 90010, and 60614)
10,264 posts, read 11,050,012 times
Reputation: 6723
I certainly hope so. Texas has become a bastian of extreme right wing politics where even the text books have to be re-written to make conservative, Christian, whites to look in the best possible way without taking into account what our history actually is.

I dont want a liberal or a conservative Texas, but I would love a moderate one.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:33 AM
 
995 posts, read 1,039,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justme02 View Post
I certainly hope so. Texas has become a bastian of extreme right wing politics where even the text books have to be re-written to make conservative, Christian, whites to look in the best possible way without taking into account what our history actually is.

I dont want a liberal or a conservative Texas, but I would love a moderate one.
I agree with everything you say except one thing. These folks may try to come off as Christians, but in no way do they resemble or live like Christians in the Bible. In fact, they are completely opposite, and are more like folks that Jesus clashed with (the leaders of the towns and the elite). Time after time, the powerful folks and leaders hassled him and put him down and called him names, and he had to put them in their place. Just read books/chapters such as Matthew. It's very clear. Too bad more folks don't see this or care...
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:47 AM
 
8,364 posts, read 11,430,824 times
Reputation: 5825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunderpig View Post
Being "educated" and being "wise and intelligent" are not the same thing. You can have a head full of facts and knowledge, but that doesn't automatically translate into intelligent statements and actions....
Unfortunately, exit polls - or any poll- can't distinguish the difference between educated and wise. Sorry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunderpig View Post
P.S., CNN is full of crap. But if you want data to match your views, then I guess you will "data" from there. But the opposite viewpoint could take that same approach, but from another source, and get complete opposite results. Statistics are overated, and are often as flawed as the faceless (hidden) folks who generate them. It's naive to put much stock in them...
I'm a CONSERVATIVE using the LIBERAL'S CHOICE NEWS SOURCE as my data point......and it's still not good enough for you? Jeeezz. Give me a break.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,645 posts, read 6,445,194 times
Reputation: 2365
As a leftie, I would have thought that PBS and MSNBC, as well as NPR, were the favoured news sources for those of us on the left -- NOT CNN.
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:15 AM
 
8,364 posts, read 11,430,824 times
Reputation: 5825
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
As a leftie, I would have thought that PBS and MSNBC, as well as NPR, were the favoured news sources for those of us on the left -- NOT CNN.
Well CNN is certainly not a conservative news network a la Fox News.

My point wast that the facts I presented regarding the education levels & voting patterns from the last election cycle DID NOT COME from a conservative news outlet.
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:49 AM
 
1,519 posts, read 3,572,051 times
Reputation: 1441
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
Well CNN is certainly not a conservative news network a la Fox News.

My point wast that the facts I presented regarding the education levels & voting patterns from the last election cycle DID NOT COME from a conservative news outlet.
Doesn't this kind of prove the point of the OP? We now have news sources that are deliberately designed to cater to our own political bias. They tell us that we were right all along and the other side is mean, evil and dirty. It further polarizes the political process and makes this more about the dirty tricks of the other side instead of the policies.

When Mitt Romney, as a Republican, enacted almost identical health-care law as Obama did as a Democrat, the opposite "sides" were crying foul. Blind allegiance to any party is a dangerous thing. And our admittedly biased news sources seem to only feed that polarization of "us vs. them."
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