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Old 06-21-2011, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Mesquite, TX
869 posts, read 1,951,220 times
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I never realized just how bad the humidity makes it feel in Dallas until I came home from a two month stint in Colorado...we were in Lamar, CO and it was 105 degrees....but the humidity was 5 percent...so it didn't feel too bad...

I got back to Dallas on Sunday and was miserable...
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Old 06-22-2011, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Metromess
11,805 posts, read 14,302,044 times
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I can relate to that. I love the dry climates!
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Old 06-22-2011, 12:56 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
3,192 posts, read 4,160,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffari-al-texani View Post
I never realized just how bad the humidity makes it feel in Dallas until I came home from a two month stint in Colorado...we were in Lamar, CO and it was 105 degrees....but the humidity was 5 percent...so it didn't feel too bad...

I got back to Dallas on Sunday and was miserable...
We probably passed each other on the road somewhere. I drove down from northeast of Denver to Dumas to pick up my oldest daughter and bring her up to grandma's house.
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:37 AM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,968 posts, read 8,681,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pontificator View Post
And maybe I do......my "lush" is relative to the area....but I am surrounding by towering 300 yr old live oaks, red oaks, and gorgeous mixed hardwoods.

You would laugh if you saw my "completely barren" backyard.

I'm constantly amazed at folks who do not really explore Texas and get to know the various ecological regions.
Do you not understand how big Texas is? And how do you know what areas people have explored of the state? I'm just saying, I've never seen any real "lushness" west of Fort Worth. Those pictures are of some short tree shrubs, IMO. Not the lush I was thinking about.
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Old 06-22-2011, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Down the road a bit
557 posts, read 934,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae713 View Post
Do you not understand how big Texas is? And how do you know what areas people have explored of the state? I'm just saying, I've never seen any real "lushness" west of Fort Worth. Those pictures are of some short tree shrubs, IMO. Not the lush I was thinking about.
I've lived in East Texas, South Central Texas, Southeast Texas, and currently west of Fort Worth.

Traveled the highways and backroads from Fort Davis and Alpine, to Marfa to Monahans, Pecos, Midland, San Angelo, Sterling City, Comanche, Amarillo, Dalhart, Muleshoe, Lubbock, Turkey, Abilene, Wichita Falls, Strawn, Jacksboro, Glen Rose, Lipan, Hico, Dublin, San Saba, Mason, Vanderpool, Utopia, Uvalde, Laredo, Rockport, Palacios, El Campo, Victoria, Hallettsville, Goliad, Shiner, Helena, Karnes City, Sutherland Springs, San Antonio, San Marcos, Geronimo, New Braunfels, Gruene, Wimberley, Blanco, Lampasas, Austin, Smithville, Dime Box, Bryan, Waco, Hillsboro, Moody, Clifton, Meridian, La Grange, Oldenburg, Plum, Burton, Brenham, Huntsville, Houston, Galveston, Baytown, High Island, Beaumont, Livingston, Lufkin, Crockett, Nacogdoches, Alto, Rusk, Jacksonville, Bullard, Larissa, Palestine, Tyler, Ben Wheeler, Edom, Kilgore, New London, Carthage, Longview, Marshall, Uncertain, Jefferson, Paris, Sulphur Springs, Texarkana, Winnsboro, Mineola, Dallas, Gainesville, Mineral Wells, and Palo Pinto, just to name a few.

No, I have no understanding at all.


* These are the smaller trees in my backyard.
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Are there misconceptions about the humidity in Texas?-spring-morning.jpg  
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Old 06-22-2011, 02:35 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 3,469,450 times
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I find Houston to be way more noticeably humid than DFW. DFW gets hot as hell, but its humidity just isnt on par with Houston's. I remember when I first moved to Houston, I had to get accustomed to being covered in sweat at 7 am in the morning. Its humidity is constant and oppressive. Dallas may GET humid, but Houston IS humid. It rains a good deal more in Houston than Dallas too.
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Broomfield, CO
1,448 posts, read 1,788,162 times
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I often find it amusing that people will try to compare cities with awful climates and try to argue as to which one is more awful. It is a fact that no one ever moved to Texas because of it's nice climate. People TOLERATE the climate in Texas because it's cheap and they can have many other things (and everything is air conditioned in all cities)

Houston is more humid overall than Dallas, but Dallas is hotter overall in the summer. So the question really comes down to this. Do you want to have 96 degree with a heat index of 102, or do you want to have 102 degree and a heat index of 102??? Just can't understand why one would be preferable to the other.

The Dallas Metroplex is a sprawling concrete jungle which doesn't allow the morning temps to get very low. Most of the metroplex remains in the low 80's during the night because of all the concrete and urban heat release. Houston usually drops into the 70's--probably has to do with more trees and higher humidities levels during the early morning hours.

The biggest difference between the 2 cities is in the winter. Dallas is significantly colder than Houston. It is also prone to more ice storms, snow, and violent storms in the springtime. Austin's climate is similar to Dallas, with the exception of slightly warmer in the winter, but still prone to ice and snowstorms.



Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
I find Houston to be way more noticeably humid than DFW. DFW gets hot as hell, but its humidity just isnt on par with Houston's. I remember when I first moved to Houston, I had to get accustomed to being covered in sweat at 7 am in the morning. Its humidity is constant and oppressive. Dallas may GET humid, but Houston IS humid. It rains a good deal more in Houston than Dallas too.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,955,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eepstein View Post
I often find it amusing that people will try to compare cities with awful climates and try to argue as to which one is more awful. It is a fact that no one ever moved to Texas because of it's nice climate. People TOLERATE the climate in Texas because it's cheap and they can have many other things (and everything is air conditioned in all cities)

Houston is more humid overall than Dallas, but Dallas is hotter overall in the summer. So the question really comes down to this. Do you want to have 96 degree with a heat index of 102, or do you want to have 102 degree and a heat index of 102??? Just can't understand why one would be preferable to the other.

The Dallas Metroplex is a sprawling concrete jungle which doesn't allow the morning temps to get very low. Most of the metroplex remains in the low 80's during the night because of all the concrete and urban heat release. Houston usually drops into the 70's--probably has to do with more trees and higher humidities levels during the early morning hours.

The biggest difference between the 2 cities is in the winter. Dallas is significantly colder than Houston. It is also prone to more ice storms, snow, and violent storms in the springtime. Austin's climate is similar to Dallas, with the exception of slightly warmer in the winter, but still prone to ice and snowstorms.
No it's much more than than. For example; my allergies are horrible in Dallas; I rarely have any issues with my allergies in Houston. I sweat a lot in Houston; I can go days without sweating in Dallas. I tend to get bad headaches in Dallas; I don't get them in Houston. My skin be dry as hell in Dallas; I rarely get dry skin in Houston. This is all due to the climate differences between the cities.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Location: At the Root
717 posts, read 205,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eepstein View Post
It is a fact that no one ever moved to Texas because of it's nice climate.
Any source to back up this "fact"? People have moved to Texas because they thought the weather here was nicer than where they came from, even though it gets hot. And some people love the heat.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:47 AM
 
3,424 posts, read 3,469,450 times
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Elevation relative to sea level also impacts humidity. Houston sits at damn near sea level. Dallas sits at a slightly higher elevation which means that its air will be thinner than a place like Houstons. The suns UV rays penetrate thin air easier which heats the atmosphere up more. Plus, like eepstein said, the amount of concrete in Dallas means that heat radiates back off the concrete and back into the immediate atmosphere. Houston tends to have more areas with standing water due to poor soil drainage and tacky streets, which contributes to the feeling of humidity.
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