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View Poll Results: Do You Observe Cinco de Mayo?
Yes 2 3.85%
No 38 73.08%
Yes, but only to "celebrate" and "party" 12 23.08%
Other (please explain) 0 0%
Voters: 52. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-05-2012, 07:14 AM
Status: "Semi-retired. On and off line interchangeably" (set 3 days ago)
 
9,820 posts, read 11,161,735 times
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Hello Fellow Texans,

I haven't started a poll in a long time...but this morning I am in rare form! LOL Not only one poll, but two (the other will follow!).

Anyway, with all the hoopla about Cinco-De-Maya, I am wondering how many out there really make a big production about it all? Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against it at all...beyond the fact that it seems ever more forced upon us to rank it right up there with Texas Independence Day.

Anyway, thoughts and opinions...?
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Old 05-05-2012, 09:51 AM
 
3,195 posts, read 2,375,005 times
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Its "Cinco de Mayo".
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Old 05-05-2012, 10:34 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,750,536 times
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I dont observe it, and I don't really feel that it's forced upon me to. Most years I forget all about it. It's no better or worse than St. Patrick's Day.
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
8,633 posts, read 16,235,842 times
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I don't make a fuss about it and we don't celebrate it, except for maybe having margarita's.
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Midland/Dallas
4,058 posts, read 4,023,940 times
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This battle was between Mexico and the French, so No, I don't celebrate it. I also doubt very seriously that most peopl celebrating it even understands the holiday. Mexico's Independence for example is actually September 16th.
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: under a rock
1,496 posts, read 762,757 times
Reputation: 1005
I read that the U.S. Latinos of Mexican heritage started celebrating it over in California (where they were pro-Union) as a rallying song for the Northern armies. They(Mexican immigrants) didn't want France, who was aligned with the South, to help the Southern forces to victory; since Mexico had just fought and won a war against France. Something about, how U.S. foreign power was weakened by the civil war, and the Mexican immigrants feared that this might enable France, to get a foothold into the U.S., if the Confederacy were to win. As for do I celebrate it? No. I don't celebrate St.Patrick's Day, either.
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Old 05-05-2012, 12:06 PM
 
118 posts, read 123,861 times
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I celebrate it. Kinda. There is usually a carnival for it here so I usually take the kids. It's fun.
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Old 05-05-2012, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,633 posts, read 6,332,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTRay View Post
This battle was between Mexico and the French, so No, I don't celebrate it. I also doubt very seriously that most peopl celebrating it even understands the holiday. Mexico's Independence for example is actually September 16th.
This is true, but the whole affair is quite hooked up with US history, in that the French-backed installation of Maxmillian as Emperor of Mexico was only pulled off because the US was having a civil war at the time and really couldn't get involved, both for military and political reasons. As soon as the Civil War ended, the US began surreptitiously supplying the republican forces of Benito Juarez with ammunition and guns through "lost" depot at El Paso de Norte.

The story of Maxmillian is actually a rather poignant one. Although he was "invited" into Mexico by the Mexican aristocracy, who were hostile to the popular government of Benito Juarez, Maxmillian himself was a liberal and progressive who prohibited child labour, forbade peons from being sold for indebtedness, cancelled the debts of peasants above ten pesos, and tried to forge an alliance with Juarez, to whom he offered the office of prime minister. Maxmillian almost certainly didn't appreciate the dubious conditions under which he was offered the rule of Mexico, which was supposedly endorsed by a plebescite -- crookedly and coercively conducted. He had no business in Mexico, of course, and the occupation by the French military spoiled any chances of legitimacy he might have had. He was executed by republican forces, dying pathetically but bravely in June 1867. The death blow to his regime was the withdrawal of the French military, though he still had some backing from a segment of Mexican society, including several thousand troops.

Despite his domestic liberalism as Emperor of Mexico (and previously as the Viceroy of Venice, to which the Hapsburg Emperor had appointed him), Maxmillian was favourably disposed toward the Confederate States, whose government had hopes of recognition by his regime. At the conclusion of the American Civil War, Maxmillian new settlements in Mexico of former Confederates, a few of which were established. Indeed, he strongly encouraged immigration from abroad generally, perhaps not just to develop the country but also to bump up the numbers of loyalists to his rule. So again, we see that this episode in Mexican history is entwined with American history. The victory of the Battle of Puebla which Cinco de Mayo commemorates was far from being the end of the French and of Maxmillian's rule in Mexico, but was arguably the beginning of the end.

Last edited by doctorjef; 05-05-2012 at 01:43 PM..
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
10,298 posts, read 9,956,576 times
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Doesn't take a genious to see that "Cinco de Mayo" is America's Oktoberfest.
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,420 posts, read 13,574,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTRay View Post
This battle was between Mexico and the French, so No, I don't celebrate it. I also doubt very seriously that most peopl celebrating it even understands the holiday. Mexico's Independence for example is actually September 16th.
I went out to a Tex-Mex restaurant with the family & asked our young Mexican waitress what it meant & low & behold she didn't even know she had to ask someone else & the person who told her said it was Mexico's independance from Spain!

That said, I never celebrate Cinco De Mayo 1. because I am White & 2. because I usually forget all about it every year.
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