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Old 05-10-2012, 11:40 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Hmm...ok, I dont recall saying they were related to the pinyon, so my statement is absolutely correct. How much further west can one go where they can find an abundance of pines in Texas? Last I checked, that was the westernmost stand of pines in Texas...am I missing something here?
I guess I misconstrued what you were saying. The way you worded it made it seem like you were saying that the Lost Pines were the most similar to the pinyon pines.
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Old 05-10-2012, 11:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I guess I misconstrued what you were saying. The way you worded it made it seem like you were saying that the Lost Pines were the most similar to the pinyon pines.
Not at all my man, not at all. The lost pines are the closest (geographically speaking, and even figuratively speaking) one will get to a ponderosa pine in Texas. Yet they are not the pines of the true southwest.
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Old 05-10-2012, 11:52 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Not at all my man, not at all. The lost pines are the closest (geographically speaking, and even figuratively speaking) one will get to a ponderosa pine in Texas. Yet they are not the pines of the true southwest.
This is what I was questioning, initially. Do you mind explaining this?
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Old 05-11-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
How much further west can one go where they can find an abundance of pines in Texas? Last I checked, that was the westernmost stand of pines in Texas...am I missing something here?
You can find native ponderosa pines at the higher elevations of Guadalupe Nat. Park near the TX/NM border and I believe I recall a few in Big Bend Nat. Park at the headquarters area, as well as around Ft. Davis at one time.

Quote:
The Rocky Mountain Ponderosa Pine located in the Nature Conservancy’s Davis Mountains Preserve of Far West Texas is believed to be the largest known example of its kind left standing in the Lone Star state. It was added to the Texas Big Tree Registry in 2006.
The pines in the Bastrop (Lost Pines) area have been largely depleted by long-time harvesting. The State Park exists to try and preserve what are left in that area. There are many old houses and other buildings still standing in the state that were constructed from lumber that came from the Bastrop pines. They were considered a premium wood for flooring, siding, etc.

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Old 05-11-2012, 11:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
This is what I was questioning, initially. Do you mind explaining this?
Ok sure. Lets get away from the touchy subject of pine trees for a second. Lets just say, someone asked "do you know where I could find some good Memphis style BBQ in Texas?" And I said, "well, there's so and so, over here and so and so over there, but really, Joes BBQ joint in Texarkana is the closest you're going to get to Memphis BBQ"....

Now, there is nothing there <anywhere at all> that says the BBQ in Texarkana is Memphis BBQ. But, if Texarkana ISNT Memphis, and yet it is the furthest point northeast in Texas that still serves BBQ, then FIGURATIVELY and geographically speaking thats the closest one is going to get to Memphis BBQ in Texas.

Youve always seemed like a very bright cat to me, and I find it very hard to believe you've never heard people use this sort of figurative language to draw parallels between two things before. This should not require some sort of court appointed panel to dissect what I said. As always, Ive enjoyed my discussion with you, but if you cant take what I said for what it is, then Im not sure that further elaboration over such a trivial disconnect would spark any revelations either, and you may be politely left to interpret it how you wish.
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Old 05-11-2012, 11:17 AM
 
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Originally Posted by joqua View Post
You can find native ponderosa pines at the higher elevations of Guadalupe Nat. Park near the TX/NM border and I believe I recall a few in Big Bend Nat. Park at the headquarters area, as well as around Ft. Davis at one time.
Oh very interesting. I stand corrected. Ive never been out that way, so I wasnt aware that Far West Texas had an abundance of pines of any sort. So then, there you have it, I would think Ft. Davis and the Big Bend area is where the OP should look to.
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Old 05-11-2012, 11:44 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,974,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Ok sure. Lets get away from the touchy subject of pine trees for a second. Lets just say, someone asked "do you know where I could find some good Memphis style BBQ in Texas?" And I said, "well, there's so and so, over here and so and so over there, but really, Joes BBQ joint in Texarkana is the closest you're going to get to Memphis BBQ"....

Now, there is nothing there <anywhere at all> that says the BBQ in Texarkana is Memphis BBQ. But, if Texarkana ISNT Memphis, and yet it is the furthest point northeast in Texas that still serves BBQ, then FIGURATIVELY and geographically speaking thats the closest one is going to get to Memphis BBQ in Texas.

Youve always seemed like a very bright cat to me, and I find it very hard to believe you've never heard people use this sort of figurative language to draw parallels between two things before. This should not require some sort of court appointed panel to dissect what I said. As always, Ive enjoyed my discussion with you, but if you cant take what I said for what it is, then Im not sure that further elaboration over such a trivial disconnect would spark any revelations either, and you may be politely left to interpret it how you wish.
There's no need to be defensive. I'm just trying to understand the figurative connection between the Lost Pines and the pines of the southwest. Do you mean to say that the LP are in somewhat of a more "southwestern" location or environment?
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Old 05-11-2012, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
2,665 posts, read 2,653,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Ive never been out that way, so I wasnt aware that Far West Texas had an abundance of pines of any sort.
Did I imply there was "an abundance" or are you just being facetious?

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Old 05-11-2012, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Houston
458 posts, read 288,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chasersaquariums View Post
I have a question that I am hoping someone can answer for me. Is there areas in Texas where there are pine trees? When I say pine trees I mean tall Ponderosa type pine trees that form forests like Northern Arizona with lakes, etc... In addition, are there any areas with these pines that are close to one of the big cities (1 hour or less) and finally do any of these areas have privately owned property that is generally available for purchase.
I think the only place Ponderosa pines exist in Texas are in the mountains of west Texas, which are more than 1 hour away from any big cities, with the possible exception of El Paso, if you count its closeness to Cloudcroft, New Mexico. Houston has pine trees in some areas, and is close to some more extensive pine forests. But, you will have to check it out to see if it fits what you would find attractive. Dallas doesn't have pines, but it isn't too far from similar pine forests, either.
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Old 05-11-2012, 11:27 PM
 
878 posts, read 385,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
There's no need to be defensive. I'm just trying to understand the figurative connection between the Lost Pines and the pines of the southwest. Do you mean to say that the LP are in somewhat of a more "southwestern" location or environment?
What do you mean there is no need to be defensive, when you just asked me to defend/explain my statement? To which I responded with a simple analogy. Now you're asking for another explanation. Which after given, will likely be followed by another directive from you to not become defensive. Ive said my piece and explained what I said. If you dont get it so be it, not everyone has to see eye to eye..

Last edited by soletaire; 05-11-2012 at 11:51 PM..
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