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Old 09-18-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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For a state with a growing population, there sure are a lot of extinct communities in Texas.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:20 PM
 
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many factors like depletion of natural resources that sustain the local economy such as drought, people moving to big cities and moving away from farms and ranches.Interesting question
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:23 PM
BCB
 
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Let's think here...

A) Texas covers more land area than any of the other contiguous states.
B) More and more people are leaving small towns for the city...think China but on a much smaller scale.

I recently drove through a few ghost towns in NE NM ( Folsom and Madison.) We were on empty, had no cell service, and it was around midnight...we needed to get back to Amarillo. Anyway, the two ghost towns were pretty neat in their own spooky way.
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Old 09-18-2013, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Bedrolls now in NM and in TX.
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Many small towns in Texas have been covered by reservoirs.
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Old 09-18-2013, 06:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
Many small towns in Texas have been covered by reservoirs.
That's right.I remember that there was one covered by one of the highland lakes that was on dry ground in 2011 due to the extreme drought.
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Old 09-18-2013, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Bedrolls now in NM and in TX.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerntraveler View Post
That's right.I remember that there was one covered by one of the highland lakes that was on dry ground in 2011 due to the extreme drought.
Yes. If you do family history research in Texas, you will run into many of these ghost town names.

Some of the best stories regarding ghost towns in eastern Texas were written by the fellow I had mentioned in an earlier post last month, Bob Bowman.
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Old 09-18-2013, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
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Ghost towns are part and parcel of USA history - not confined to Texas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ghost_towns_in_the_United_States

The reasons for their demise is as varied as the list of locations.

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Old 09-18-2013, 09:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
For a state with a growing population, there sure are a lot of extinct communities in Texas.
Texas is huge and has been different things at different times. Thinking about the Terlingua area, for example. It was a mining area. That ended and the towns died as people moved on to do something else. Some places were passed up by railroads, highways, etc...people move on. People move to the cities, one type of business is surpassed by another...not at all unusual in an area this large.
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Old 09-18-2013, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Bedrolls now in NM and in TX.
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Although I've never visited the site, perhaps my favorite Texas ghost town is Adobe Walls in Hutchinson County where Billy Dixon made his famous mile-long rifle shot in 1874 and ended the 2nd Battle of Adobe Walls with the Comanches.
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Old 09-18-2013, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Also, in the late Nineteenth through early Twentieth centuries, many communities lived and died by the railroad; older settlements would oftentimes find themselves supplanted by towns platted by the railroads, and lose commerce and eventually populations as well (good examples of this situation are Belle Plain/Baird in Callahan County, Clairemont/Jayton in Kent County, and Sherwood/Mertzon in Irion County, though there are dozens more I can't think of at the moment.
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