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Old 11-21-2007, 02:42 AM
 
Location: Dallas
3,035 posts, read 4,713,479 times
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With all the newcomers moving here from California, most probably don't think the possiblity of an earthquake here is likely. When IN FACT there is a pretty good sized faultline running right through the middle of the state. The Balcones Fault. It stretches from the San Antonio are to just north of Waco. Is anyone concerned about it one day slipping or opening up?

The thought has definitely crossed my mind a few times.
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Old 11-21-2007, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Alvarado, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JVTX72 View Post
With all the newcomers moving here from California, most probably don't think the possiblity of an earthquake here is likely. When IN FACT there is a pretty good sized faultline running right through the middle of the state. The Balcones Fault. It stretches from the San Antonio are to just north of Waco. Is anyone concerned about it one day slipping or opening up?

The thought has definitely crossed my mind a few times.
Nothing like a little scare tactic to begin one's day, eh? From Wikipedia: "The Balcones Fault zone was most recently active about 15 million years ago during the Miocene epoch. This activity was related to subsidence of the Texas Coastal Plain, most likely from the large amount of sediment deposited on it by Texas rivers."

Balcones Fault - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's a much, much better chance for an earthquake to happen in the middle Mississippi River area from say, Cape Girardeaux (sp?) to Memphis, than in TX.
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Old 11-21-2007, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Slaughter Creek, Travis County
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Thanks Delta for nipping this in the bud. According to the USGS seismic maps, Texas is has a seismic design category of A-0 meaning we don't need to consider in the design of buildings.

See the following USGS data for probabilities of peak ground motion acceleration if your interested:

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/hazmaps/products_data/2002/2002April03/US/USpga2500v4.pdf (broken link)
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Old 11-21-2007, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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We only refer to it here to separate the rocky areas from the dirt areas
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Old 11-21-2007, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Alvarado, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by car957 View Post
Thanks Delta for nipping this in the bud. According to the USGS seismic maps, Texas is has a seismic design category of A-0 meaning we don't need to consider in the design of buildings.

See the following USGS data for probabilities of peak ground motion acceleration if your interested:

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/hazmaps/products_data/2002/2002April03/US/USpga2500v4.pdf (broken link)
I saw that schematic on wikipedia, but didn't fully understand it as I'm not an engineer by any sense of the word. Interesting.

Speaking of the fault in the river north of Memphis, the New Madrid Fault, I was in the head one Sunday morning, must have been in the late 60s, when there was a slight shift in the plates up there, came all the way down to my hometown, about 100 miles south of Memphis. Got my attention, real quick. If that's the closest I ever come to an earthquake, that's fine by me.

I've read some of the geological history of Texas, and the Balcones Fault is interesting. The Edwards Plateau is even more interesting, though. But like I said, I'm not an engineer nor a geologist, it's just interesting reading without all the hyperbole. Fun things to know when drive down to San Antonio and watching the scenery to the west of I-35.
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Old 11-21-2007, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Slaughter Creek, Travis County
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Delta

The Edwards Plateau is an interesting and unique element of Texas topography. The USGS has found it is very influential in our weather patterns in South Central Texas. The USGS data revealed that the Plateau produces more flash floods than any other area in this longitude. The Edwards Plateau is about 140 miles long. Its topography creates lift for air which enhances the strength of thunderstorms.

I was in Southern California about 15 years ago and enjoyed a 3.3 earthquake from the 15th floor of a Marriott at LAX. I'll take a tornado any day over that.
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Old 11-21-2007, 10:54 AM
 
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There's a nice little fault in the Texas Panhandle, too - you wouldn't think there'd be one there with all the wonderful miles and miles of flat land....we had a couple of little earthquakes in the north part of Amarillo while living there a about 3-4 years ago. One was enough to drop the water table quite a lot...some people had to go in and lower their water wells to reach the water again.
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Old 11-21-2007, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Alvarado, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GayleTX View Post
There's a nice little fault in the Texas Panhandle, too - you wouldn't think there'd be one there with all the wonderful miles and miles of flat land....we had a couple of little earthquakes in the north part of Amarillo while living there a about 3-4 years ago. One was enough to drop the water table quite a lot...some people had to go in and lower their water wells to reach the water again.
I vaguely remember that, but I never really heard much about it. There's just not a whole lot of anything from Amarillo to Dumas I know, and while I've been through the panhandle going up to Colorado, I don't remember too much past Dumas.
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Old 11-21-2007, 06:12 PM
 
Location: SE Texas
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I have a friend who was a land surveyor, in the Houston area alone there are 86 small faultlines. For the curious, a map from harris county flood control district: (Warning, 3MB file,dial up beware)
http://www.hcfcd.org/images/PrincplA...HC_2006-LG.jpg
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Old 11-21-2007, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Dallas
3,035 posts, read 4,713,479 times
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My grandfather worked for a cement company in the 1960s when they were building the Lake Waco Dam (which lies right on top of the fault), and said that the fault slipped a little bit , causing a stoppage of construction. Theres pictures of it somewhere, I'll look for them. I guess there was no major problem or else they wouldnt have finished the dam. Its still a lttle scary to say the least. Not really something to worry much about though, our chances of getting hit by a tornado are much greater.
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