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Old 07-30-2014, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,412 posts, read 2,840,076 times
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Not that I would want to live in a rural area. Corpus is too small for me as it is.

However, Marble Falls, Bandera/Medina, Kerrville, Fredricksburg, Camp Wood, Uvalde, and Rocksprings are all nice.
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Old 07-30-2014, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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Dime Box!
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Old 07-30-2014, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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Post is rather pretty (near Lubbock but before you get up on the topographically boring South Plains).
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
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Junction maybe,
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:54 PM
 
2,930 posts, read 4,116,465 times
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You had this thread yesterday, with many responses but I guess you deleted the thread?, but hey, you started over today and got all the small, really small towns over the entire state listed as ideas, lol now what, lol, try for a third tomorrow, lol, anyway good luck !
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Old 07-30-2014, 09:43 PM
 
7 posts, read 9,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamaralj View Post
I love small towns. I currently live in a town of about 3,000 people and the whole county is around 25,000. However, I live about 50 miles from a much larger city.
Been there, done that, no thanks.
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Old 07-30-2014, 09:44 PM
 
2,930 posts, read 4,116,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Senior View Post
You had this thread yesterday, with many responses but I guess you deleted the thread?, but hey, you started over today and got all the small, really small towns over the entire state listed as ideas, lol now what, lol, try for a third tomorrow, lol, anyway good luck !
oops !
Tried to delete this, not the same thread as yesterday, my bad, sorry !!

You asked for small towns around Tyler, Well lots of them adjacent to Tyler, but you want to be outside of city limits, right? You could be in Lindale ISD, Whitehouse, ISD and Bullard ISD and be outside of a city itself, but "land" may be too expensive, it more depends on what you "need" for a house. Still, best to you one day somewhere.
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Old 07-31-2014, 08:05 AM
 
536 posts, read 788,901 times
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Wow, lots of ideas for sure! Thank you all for suggestions. Yes, Mark this is a different thread from the first one I started about Home stead exemptions. I was curious about small towns and rural areas, thinking it might be cheaper to live in a small town.

What will end up happening when we do move would be that we'd rent first some place, and look around. We wouldn't buy a place till we were sure where we wanted to live. I think it's always wise to rent first for a year if you can, till you know.

The biggest challenge I can see is the property taxes being so high. It does make our overhead costs more. If we have a house payment it would be higher than here with the property taxes added in. That's why I thought we should try to pay mostly in cash, or a large down where we could pay off a property, and then only have the taxes to pay. This is why I was asking in my other thread about the homestead exemption and wondered if it help lower the taxes some.

Where ever we end up, we'll go out scouting first and traveling around to see areas. This includes other states we are investigating. Seems every place has something. If it doesn't have state income tax, it has high property tax, or sales tax or something else. Kansas has a high property tax, but they just lowered their sales tax, and their state income tax is low, but they tax retirement. It's sort of a balance I suppose. Texas has always been on the radar for me, as I love that Texas pride, and all. I've always wanted to live there, and I think sometimes that can out weigh other things. You have to love where you live. That's why people put up with taxes and things when they truly love the area they live in.
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Old 07-31-2014, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Physically or psychologically?
13,108 posts, read 18,010,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamaralj View Post
I was curious about small towns and rural areas, thinking it might be cheaper to live in a small town.

---SNIP--

You have to love where you live. That's why people put up with taxes and things when they truly love the area they live in.
I believe I had mentioned yesterday that we also have a home in Albuquerque? Based on having a city home and a rural home, I would have to say it can very easily cost more to live rurally. This is true since you will become totally responsible for things like the water and sewer a municipality in an urban setting would normally provide for you at nominal rates. You will also have to drive further for things you may need like groceries, gas and medical services. Your home insurance may be greater since there may be no fire protection services in your area. The added expenses become even more emphasized if you move to a rural area and seek recreational amenities similar to those you would have in an urban setting.

However, if you don't expect the same amenities as urban living, and are willing to take on the some of the responsibilities normally provided by municipalities, rural living can normally provide many more opportunities to save money. Here we have a large food freezer and a large cupboard to save trips to the grocery. Additionally my few rural neighbors do not expect me to keep my trees and lawn trimmed to perfection at all times. I also can do most of my own work on my vehicles which allows me to drive older and less expensive vehicles. I have barns with work areas in which I can repair things instead of replacing them.

In summary, to compare the costs of rural living to urban living is impossible unless one knows what sort of lifestyle the person is seeking. Rural living can be difficult, hard and expensive. Some urban living can be the same but usually in very different ways. I speak from experience having returned to a rural life after having made a living and a retirement in several major cities.

As you say, some things are worth the extra expense. It's all starts and ends with what you want.

Again, best of luck.
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Old 07-31-2014, 03:40 PM
 
536 posts, read 788,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
I believe I had mentioned yesterday that we also have a home in Albuquerque? Based on having a city home and a rural home, I would have to say it can very easily cost more to live rurally. This is true since you will become totally responsible for things like the water and sewer a municipality in an urban setting would normally provide for you at nominal rates. You will also have to drive further for things you may need like groceries, gas and medical services. Your home insurance may be greater since there may be no fire protection services in your area. The added expenses become even more emphasized if you move to a rural area and seek recreational amenities similar to those you would have in an urban setting.

However, if you don't expect the same amenities as urban living, and are willing to take on the some of the responsibilities normally provided by municipalities, rural living can normally provide many more opportunities to save money. Here we have a large food freezer and a large cupboard to save trips to the grocery. Additionally my few rural neighbors do not expect me to keep my trees and lawn trimmed to perfection at all times. I also can do most of my own work on my vehicles which allows me to drive older and less expensive vehicles. I have barns with work areas in which I can repair things instead of replacing them.

In summary, to compare the costs of rural living to urban living is impossible unless one knows what sort of lifestyle the person is seeking. Rural living can be difficult, hard and expensive. Some urban living can be the same but usually in very different ways. I speak from experience having returned to a rural life after having made a living and a retirement in several major cities.

As you say, some things are worth the extra expense. It's all starts and ends with what you want.

Again, best of luck.

You make some good points here in your post. Thank you for that insight. Yes, I'm not truly sure if I want very rural, or more just a small town. But interestingly, right now I am comparing Lubbock (a much larger city than I have ever lived in) to Tyler. I am comparing the property tax rate and local sales tax. It appears that Lubbock is higher on both accounts to Tyler. So maybe the panhandle is more expensive. But Lubbock had a lot of cheap housing choices on Trulia, so that's what interested me. At any rate, I think I am slowly narrowing down my search to two areas in Texas. Pan handle and East. Namely Lubbock and Tyler. Two different areas, with different things to offer. One other area I looked into, and still haven't ruled out is San Angelo, Tom Green County. I do have some research to do, but wanted to try to narrow down my search some. Of the three areas I've only actually been through Lubbock. Years ago.
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