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Old 01-14-2015, 08:06 PM
 
723 posts, read 505,265 times
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I 'm looking for affordable 10 acres to 15 acres in Texas (with an affordable down payment )where I can have a ranch and build whatever house I want to build there, and do some farming. Some place with green trees,within 30 or 40 miles from the sea , not noisy and safe. I'd appreciate any advice. I have never been to Texas.
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Old 01-15-2015, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,727 posts, read 9,116,255 times
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Thirty to forty miles "from the sea", i.e. Gulf of Mexico, puts you well into the coastal plain, which is not generally the best place for naturally occurring trees and the sort of land you seem to be implying.
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Old 01-15-2015, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Land is not affordable here in north east Texas. You're looking at easily $2700-5000/acre. Finding a house in decent shape for a reasonable price is also hard to find. Good luck.
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Old 01-15-2015, 09:13 AM
 
3,028 posts, read 6,171,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
Thirty to forty miles "from the sea", i.e. Gulf of Mexico, puts you well into the coastal plain, which is not generally the best place for naturally occurring trees and the sort of land you seem to be implying.
^^^^this^^^^

I'd look somewhere in East Texas, maybe near a lake if water is your thing.
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Old 01-15-2015, 09:29 AM
 
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I sort of disagree with everyone else. Comparatively, the coast line of TX is way greener than the western portions of the state, just check the google map yourself.

If you want the greenest, check around Lake Jackson/West Columbia, then south of that in the Beeville/Victoria area. I believe the $2700-$5000 an acre price ranges are accurate (comparatively that is affordable compared to my lot in DFW worth $150k an acre, which is again comparatively affordable compared to the east & west coast.

You mention farming, so I'm assuming you don't want a lot completely covered with trees, otherwise you'd have to pay to clear them and destroy a lot of nature unnecessarily in the process.

The only downside is the Texas coast is not the best, it is sparsely populated as most of the population centers are much farther inland.


You may also check out other southern states, as the land will be more affordable and greener as you go east.
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Old 01-15-2015, 01:08 PM
 
1,966 posts, read 2,596,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
I sort of disagree with everyone else. Comparatively, the coast line of TX is way greener than the western portions of the state, just check the google map yourself.

If you want the greenest, check around Lake Jackson/West Columbia, then south of that in the Beeville/Victoria area. I believe the $2700-$5000 an acre price ranges are accurate (comparatively that is affordable compared to my lot in DFW worth $150k an acre, which is again comparatively affordable compared to the east & west coast.

You mention farming, so I'm assuming you don't want a lot completely covered with trees, otherwise you'd have to pay to clear them and destroy a lot of nature unnecessarily in the process.

The only downside is the Texas coast is not the best, it is sparsely populated as most of the population centers are much farther inland.


You may also check out other southern states, as the land will be more affordable and greener as you go east.
you get a rep for using the word "father" instead of the typical word used is "further" just a pet peeve of mine along with "normal" temperature when they are "average," just the mean, not mode or median temperature. Like on December 3rd it could be a high of 35 or 75, they would use sum of the digits and divide, or 35 and 75 = 110 or "normal temp" is 55 not average. I've asked DFW weather guys, why, they said people are just "used to" hearing normal. go figure... Sorry off subject, got it off my chest, lol.
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Old 01-15-2015, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
3,829 posts, read 3,372,590 times
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Try someplace in Liberty County Texas

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Li...48bf33!6m1!1e1

fertile land plenty of rain and about the range from the coast you were talking about

Liberty County, Texas Land for sale, Liberty County, Texas Acreage for Sale, Liberty County, Texas Lots for Sale at LandWatch.com

Prices seem to range from about 3 to 5 k per acre....

I hope this helps !
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Old 01-15-2015, 06:32 PM
 
Location: WA
1,507 posts, read 2,723,745 times
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Drop the 30 miles to the sea criteria and you'll have a lot more options.

Pull out a map of Texas and observe I-35 running North-South through the state through San Antonio, Austin, Waco, Dallas/Fort Worth and on up through Oklahoma. This is basically marks the dividing line between the greener farmlands to the east and the more dry ranch lands to the west. One doesn't have to drive all the far west of I-35 to see crop agriculture start to dry up due to lack of water and range land take over.

If you want a little "ranch" property where you can have a few animals and live the rural life then there is a lot of rugged and pretty land to the west from the hill country west of San Antonio and Austin all the way up to the towns west of Fort Worth. But you'll likely be forced to irrigate if you want to garden or grow much of anything and water can be scarce.

If you want to actually plant crops in the ground then the I-35 corridor and points east is where you want to concentrate. In any event, 15 acres is just a large exurban lot that won't hold more than a horse or two. Actual ranching and actual agriculture starts on a scale that is 100x larger than that around here.
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Old 01-15-2015, 08:12 PM
 
Location: East Texas, with the Clan of the Cave Bear
1,832 posts, read 3,743,668 times
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Safe, sandy loam soil, lots of trees, affordable land !

Only drawback for you is it's about 75 miles to the coast.

Tyler County or any of the surrounding counties here in SE Texas.

Why do you want to be that close to the coast? I'm just curious. (I've lived where the water is salty).
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Old 01-15-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: East Texas, with the Clan of the Cave Bear
1,832 posts, read 3,743,668 times
Reputation: 1956
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Drop the 30 miles to the sea criteria and you'll have a lot more options.

Pull out a map of Texas and observe I-35 running North-South through the state through San Antonio, Austin, Waco, Dallas/Fort Worth and on up through Oklahoma. This is basically marks the dividing line between the greener farmlands to the east and the more dry ranch lands to the west. One doesn't have to drive all the far west of I-35 to see crop agriculture start to dry up due to lack of water and range land take over.

If you want a little "ranch" property where you can have a few animals and live the rural life then there is a lot of rugged and pretty land to the west from the hill country west of San Antonio and Austin all the way up to the towns west of Fort Worth. But you'll likely be forced to irrigate if you want to garden or grow much of anything and water can be scarce.

If you want to actually plant crops in the ground then the I-35 corridor and points east is where you want to concentrate. In any event, 15 acres is just a large exurban lot that won't hold more than a horse or two. Actual ranching and actual agriculture starts on a scale that is 100x larger than that around here.

I garden a couple of acres.









If you buy your winter hay then East Texas most years can run a cow per acre, 2 acres at most. If you gotta grow and cut your own hay then that won't work. So a little 5 acre pasture would let you grow out your beef for slaughter and home use. Lotta folks do that around here. Granted more acreage gives you a bigger operation and more options.


Most folks that have been living on a 40' x 100' city lot then 10-15 acres seems like a huge expanse of land.
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