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Old 01-08-2008, 05:31 PM
 
8 posts, read 90,838 times
Reputation: 14
Question How do I become a Texas citizen? Relocated from NM

I think I'm eligible to become a Texas citizen, but I'm not sure how.

I moved to Texas in 2003 for college and have stayed here ever since. During college, I was employed with the University for 22 months or so, and since college I have been employed at another job (in San Antonio) for seven months. During college I kept my NM citizenship because I wasn't sure where I'd end up after graduation. Now I know I'll be in Texas for the foreseeable future and so I'd like to become a Texas citizen, register to vote here, etc.

Does anybody have a clue as to where I should begin this process? I appreciate your help.
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Old 01-08-2008, 05:45 PM
 
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I really think that all you need to do is get a Texas Driver's License, have a Texas address, and register to vote. There are no formal citizenship requirements.
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Midland, Tx
38 posts, read 120,587 times
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Default Texas Citizenship

I think you qualify. Here is the Texas Secretary of State site, it has instructions on how to register.Texas Voting
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesAbilene View Post
I really think that all you need to do is get a Texas Driver's License, have a Texas address, and register to vote. There are no formal citizenship requirements.
Excellent. This does help. However, it also confuses me - how, then, is residency 'officially' determined for things such as University tuition? It's been a while since I've gone through that process. Maybe I'm confusing the concepts of residency and citizenship.
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:47 AM
 
8 posts, read 90,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerliryc View Post
I think you qualify. Here is the Texas Secretary of State site, it has instructions on how to register.Texas Voting
Ah yes - after I read Turnerliryc's response to my wife last night, she pulled a voter registration card out of somewhere and I read the qualifications on it. It seems I do qualify, so I filled it out and I'm mailing it from work today!
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:01 AM
 
11,203 posts, read 16,535,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctrlshiftesc View Post
Excellent. This does help. However, it also confuses me - how, then, is residency 'officially' determined for things such as University tuition? It's been a while since I've gone through that process. Maybe I'm confusing the concepts of residency and citizenship.
I think you just have to prove residency (as with a Texas DL, utility bill etc.) and there may be a requirement that you've lived in the state for a given time (6-12 months or so) for in-state tuition.
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Old 01-09-2008, 02:19 PM
 
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I have lived in several states, and taken college/university courses in each one. Residency is usually based on parent's address (if you are under 21). If you move to a state to work, residency is based on your address. I remember having to take documentation about my company transferring me to qualify for in-state tuition...basically, I had to prove that I did not move to the state just to qualify for resident tuition. If you can't meet those requirements, residency usually requires a year without your being enrolled in a public university. But you are a citizen the entire time!
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Old 02-17-2014, 06:55 AM
 
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If you are born in Texas you are given a certificate of being a Citizen of Texas.
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Old 02-17-2014, 11:39 AM
 
320 posts, read 246,364 times
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Citizen? Texas is a state..you woud become a resident but still get to keep your citizenship in the United States of America.
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Old 02-17-2014, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Tejas
6,679 posts, read 10,028,617 times
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Yeah definitely some confusion over terminology for sure. Youre a Resident of the State and a Citizen of the USA.
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