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Old 07-28-2019, 12:56 AM
 
3,024 posts, read 4,700,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C24L View Post
I thought the same thing myself. However, I don't think Tyler will get big growth rates.Thats just me though.
It's not JUST you, now, you've and others have been able to see my very recent posts, where I show rapid growth in Tyler, is just about impossible for several reasons.

AGAIN, absolutely no reason for and huge explosive growth, AGAIN, voters said NO to explosive growth, said no to, little or any growth, in the 1995 city election. NO incentives "possible," by the outcome of this election, to even attract, ANY employer to Tyler, except for the incentive tax abatements, which, practically ALL cities in Texas offer, so NO incentives, like land, building, MONEY are available to offer. According to the Longview New"s Journal, Longview offered MILLIONS in incentives to have Dollar General build a distribution warehouse in Longview, with 400 better-paying jobs. Know, I did not google the exact amounts.
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Old 07-28-2019, 01:34 AM
 
23,696 posts, read 8,160,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Senior View Post
It's not JUST you, now, you've and others have been able to see my very recent posts, where I show rapid growth in Tyler, is just about impossible for several reasons.

AGAIN, absolutely no reason for and huge explosive growth, AGAIN, voters said NO to explosive growth, said no to, little or any growth, in the 1995 city election. NO incentives "possible," by the outcome of this election, to even attract, ANY employer to Tyler, except for the incentive tax abatements, which, practically ALL cities in Texas offer, so NO incentives, like land, building, MONEY are available to offer. According to the Longview New"s Journal, Longview offered MILLIONS in incentives to have Dollar General build a distribution warehouse in Longview, with 400 better-paying jobs. Know, I did not google the exact amounts.
ya i completly agree with u.
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Old 07-28-2019, 07:15 AM
Status: "There are better things ahead than behind. CS Lewis" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
65,076 posts, read 54,437,634 times
Reputation: 96044
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTomo View Post
Have you not seen all the construction along I20? It’s a madhouse up there. A couple years ago TxDot announced a complete rework of the I20 corridor to include widening, new lighting, drainage and new highway interchanges with 2 mixmasters being built. I’ve been told that on average 100 homes a week are being built in Tyler and 1 new business opens everyday on average. Tyler is seeing this growth because of its attractiveness to people from the DFW metro. Tyler is growing regardless of what people may think or want. Tyler is the next up and coming city in Texas and it’s metro area WILL double within 25 years so get ready.. I wouldn’t be surprised to see light rail service in the city of Tyler by 2025. Also, Tyler is a huge medical hub with medical facilities that rival most in Texas. That means Tyler has A lot of high paying jobs for a city it’s size.
I agree with much of this, and especially the "growing regardless of who wants it to grow" thing. Tyler has had a consistent growth pattern since I moved to this area 25 years ago. Regardless of "old school Tyler's" attitude or desires, Tyler consistently attracts new people, new businesses, and healthy growth.

And yes, I have been watching the brouhaha on I-20 for years. Following are some links and one of them (the report, not the summary) also highlights the hot spots for serious wrecks, as well as the reasons for the wrecks - very interesting. As I thought, there's a hot spot in Gregg County that for some reason has the very highest fatality rates. This is just outside of Kilgore. I KNEW it! But all of Smith County is considered a hot spot wreck wise, from one end of the county to the other.

OK, here is a summary of a report from 2014 by TXDOT - one of the things covered is the need for more light rail services, as well as 131 listed projects that are in the works:
http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot...ve-summary.pdf

Here is the more in depth report that the summary is based on:
http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot...dor/report.pdf

26 projects are highlighted for Smith County. Eleven of those are interchange improvements and 6 of those are added capacity improvements.


This report also states that the projected population of Smith County by 2040 (21 years from now) should be around 281,000 - that is the most populous NE Texas county that has I-20 running through it, after the Dallas metro area. All counties along I-20 in NE Texas are projected to experience about a 50 percent growth between now and 2040.

For anyone interested in projected growth and expansion of the NE counties between the Louisiana state line and Dallas, along I-20 which is the most dynamic region, this report is fascinating.
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Old 07-28-2019, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Born + raised SF Bay; Tyler, TX now WNY
6,502 posts, read 3,121,889 times
Reputation: 6179
Tyler/Longview, Waco, Weatherford, and McAllen/Weslaco/that whole metro
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Old 07-28-2019, 08:13 AM
Status: "There are better things ahead than behind. CS Lewis" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
65,076 posts, read 54,437,634 times
Reputation: 96044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Senior View Post
It's not JUST you, now, you've and others have been able to see my very recent posts, where I show rapid growth in Tyler, is just about impossible for several reasons.

AGAIN, absolutely no reason for and huge explosive growth, AGAIN, voters said NO to explosive growth, said no to, little or any growth, in the 1995 city election. NO incentives "possible," by the outcome of this election, to even attract, ANY employer to Tyler, except for the incentive tax abatements, which, practically ALL cities in Texas offer, so NO incentives, like land, building, MONEY are available to offer. According to the Longview New"s Journal, Longview offered MILLIONS in incentives to have Dollar General build a distribution warehouse in Longview, with 400 better-paying jobs. Know, I did not google the exact amounts.
I wanted to do a bit of research as well as comparison between Tyler and Longview so here are some sources and facts that I pulled (Some numbers are for metro areas and some are for the cities - sorry but the stats fluctuate - if you want to see the differences check out the links):

Sperlings says that the cost of living in Longview is higher than in Tyler. Having lived in the Longview area for about 8 years (up til about 5 years ago - prior to that I lived in the Tyler metro area for about 12 years) I agree with that assessment, which was also frustrating to me due mostly to the fact that Longview is smaller than Tyler, with fewer amenities - and yet it cost more to live there. Housing costs are higher (can't figure that out AT ALL), medical care is more expensive (another big question in my mind), and utilities are higher, among other smaller expenses.Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site


Tyler's unemployment rate is below the national average. Longview's is above the national average.

Tyler's job market has increased by 3.2 percent over the past year. Longview - 1 percent growth. Tyler's projected growth in the job market over the next ten years is above the national average of 33.5 percent.(Tyler - 36.4, Longview 19.6.)

The average salary is higher in Tyler than in Longview. Same with the family median income.

Longview has a higher percentage of manufacturing jobs than Tyler (considerably more in fact) and also a higher percentage of manufacturing jobs than the national average. Tyler has a higher percentage of information jobs than Longview and also those percentages are above the national average in Tyler (not in Longview). Tyler is above the national average when it comes to educational services, while Longview is below. Both cities are above the national average when it comes to healthcare - but Tyler is significantly above while Longview is less so (but still above the national average which is great). Both cities are above the national average when it comes to service and accommodation and retail trade jobs.

For some weird reason, Tyler's air and water quality is better than Longview's. I have no idea why. Oh, maybe it's because Tyler's Superfund Index is higher than the national average as well as Longview's.

Both Tyler and Longview have a higher than average number of doctors per population than the US in general, which is great. Tyler's is significantly higher than the US average, and Longview's is somewhat higher.

Both cities have a shorter than average commute time - also great. Longview's is even shorter than Tyler's!

Longview's median age is a bit higher than Tyler's but both are far below the national average. Longview's number of people per household is slightly higher than Tyler's (with a lower median household income, which is interesting - I just realized that information). Longview has a higher percentage of single parents than Tyler.

This was SUPER interesting: Between 2000 and now, Tyler has grown at nearly double the national average - 22.6 percent (national average is 12.6 percent). Longview's rate of growth was slightly below the national average, at 12.1 percent. I mean, wow - a 22.6 percent rate of growth for Tyler (and this is just the city, not the metro area) is amazing. Between 1990 and now the growth rate for Tyler was an amazing 35.9 percent! (National average is 27.4 - Longview's is 16.9).

Both cities lean conservative. Tyler, while predominately Republican, has a higher percentage of Democrats as well as Independents.

Here's a real interesting tidbit to me - real estate stats. Tyler real estate has appreciated 7.7 percent in the past year, and 26.1 percent in the last ten years. Longview's has DEPRECIATED 12.5 percent in the past year and was up 15 percent over the past ten years.

Longview has a higher property tax rate than Tyler. Both rates are above the national average - HOWEVER, the actual average property tax amounts for both cities are below the national average. Rental costs are both about the same but are lower than the national average.

Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site

Last edited by Yac; 08-05-2019 at 03:04 AM..
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:52 AM
 
3,024 posts, read 4,700,462 times
Reputation: 1901
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I agree with much of this, and especially the "growing regardless of who wants it to grow" thing. Tyler has had a consistent growth pattern since I moved to this area 25 years ago. Regardless of "old school Tyler's" attitude or desires, Tyler consistently attracts new people, new businesses, and healthy growth.

And yes, I have been watching the brouhaha on I-20 for years. Following are some links and one of them (the report, not the summary) also highlights the hot spots for serious wrecks, as well as the reasons for the wrecks - very interesting. As I thought, there's a hot spot in Gregg County that for some reason has the very highest fatality rates. This is just outside of Kilgore. I KNEW it! But all of Smith County is considered a hot spot wreck wise, from one end of the county to the other.

OK, here is a summary of a report from 2014 by TXDOT - one of the things covered is the need for more light rail services, as well as 131 listed projects that are in the works:
http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot...ve-summary.pdf

Here is the more in depth report that the summary is based on:
http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot...dor/report.pdf

26 projects are highlighted for Smith County. Eleven of those are interchange improvements and 6 of those are added capacity improvements.


This report also states that the projected population of Smith County by 2040 (21 years from now) should be around 281,000 - that is the most populous NE Texas county that has I-20 running through it, after the Dallas metro area. All counties along I-20 in NE Texas are projected to experience about a 50 percent growth between now and 2040.

For anyone interested in projected growth and expansion of the NE counties between the Louisiana state line and Dallas, along I-20 which is the most dynamic region, this report is fascinating.
Ok, I DID miss this in 2014, now 5 years ago, I would like an update of those projected construction dates, likely behind schedule, anyway, Kaufman County, to the west of Tyler has a projected date of 2015-2020 for frontage improvement or adding of frontage roads, the far eastern part of Kaufman county the dates are 2021-2030, and Van Zandt County to the east of Kaufman, 2021-2030, then Smith (where Tyler is) 2021-2040) completion dates, then Gregg (where Longview is) earlier back to 2021-2030). I thought the poster meant immediate plans for the Tyler area, this is far in the future, will the funds be available, higher demand in the rest of the state. I hope ya'll get to see this, I want, lol And a 50% increase of the county populations, Tyler East no, Kaufman, maybe, Van Zandt less than 50%, a maybe. Sure, in each 10 year period Smith County has been growing 25 - 30 thousand, earlier around 30, now, 25, the 2020 census likely to show 20-25,000 betweeen 2010-2020, unless there is a better count of the normal undercounts, minorities. Not really likely. The 281,000 estimate, I agree too, is right on, likely, but not a 50% growth that would be 345,000. The counties to the east of Tyler are growing no where in the propjected 50%, so why again the boom for these estimates to be correct.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:56 AM
Status: "There are better things ahead than behind. CS Lewis" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
65,076 posts, read 54,437,634 times
Reputation: 96044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Senior View Post
Ok, I DID miss this in 2014, now 5 years ago, I would like an update of those projected construction dates, likely behind schedule, anyway, Kaufman County, to the west of Tyler has a projected date of 2015-2020 for frontage improvement or adding of frontage roads, the far eastern part of Kaufman county the dates are 2021-2030, and Van Zandt County to the east of Kaufman, 2021-2030, then Smith (where Tyler is) 2021-2040) completion dates, then Gregg (where Longview is) earlier back to 2021-2030). I thought the poster meant immediate plans for the Tyler area, this is far in the future, will the funds be available, higher demand in the rest of the state. I hope ya'll get to see this, I want, lol And a 50% increase of the county populations, Tyler East no, Kaufman, maybe, Van Zandt less than 50%, a maybe. Sure, in each 10 year period Smith County has been growing 25 - 30 thousand, earlier around 30, now, 25, the 2020 census likely to show 20-25,000 betweeen 2010-2020, unless there is a better count of the normal undercounts, minorities. Not really likely. The 281,000 estimate, I agree too, is right on, likely, but not a 50% growth that would be 345,000. The counties to the east of Tyler are growing no where in the propjected 50%, so why again the boom for these estimates to be correct.
Oh, I totally agree that Smith County/Tyler is not likely to grow at anywhere near a 50 percent rate, which is why I posted this information.

I want to also point out that 2021 through 2040 (but especially 2021 through 2030) is not that far in the future - it's right around the corner actually. And those are projected COMPLETION dates. On a lot lot lot of projects for Smith County.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:58 AM
Status: "There are better things ahead than behind. CS Lewis" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
65,076 posts, read 54,437,634 times
Reputation: 96044
And my other post - I want to point out that Tyler is growing faster than the national average, and MUCH faster than Longview. There is no end in sight. Tyler is on track to continue to grow at a brisk pace as well. And it's not just Tyler - it's the surrounding areas within the metro area.
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:15 AM
 
3,024 posts, read 4,700,462 times
Reputation: 1901
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I wanted to do a bit of research as well as comparison between Tyler and Longview so here are some sources and facts that I pulled (Some numbers are for metro areas and some are for the cities - sorry but the stats fluctuate - if you want to see the differences check out the links):

Sperlings says that the cost of living in Longview is higher than in Tyler. Having lived in the Longview area for about 8 years (up til about 5 years ago - prior to that I lived in the Tyler metro area for about 12 years) I agree with that assessment, which was also frustrating to me due mostly to the fact that Longview is smaller than Tyler, with fewer amenities - and yet it cost more to live there. Housing costs are higher (can't figure that out AT ALL), medical care is more expensive (another big question in my mind), and utilities are higher, among other smaller expenses.Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site


Tyler's unemployment rate is below the national average. Longview's is above the national average.

Tyler's job market has increased by 3.2 percent over the past year. Longview - 1 percent growth. Tyler's projected growth in the job market over the next ten years is above the national average of 33.5 percent.(Tyler - 36.4, Longview 19.6.)

The average salary is higher in Tyler than in Longview. Same with the family median income.

Longview has a higher percentage of manufacturing jobs than Tyler (considerably more in fact) and also a higher percentage of manufacturing jobs than the national average. Tyler has a higher percentage of information jobs than Longview and also those percentages are above the national average in Tyler (not in Longview). Tyler is above the national average when it comes to educational services, while Longview is below. Both cities are above the national average when it comes to healthcare - but Tyler is significantly above while Longview is less so (but still above the national average which is great). Both cities are above the national average when it comes to service and accommodation and retail trade jobs.

For some weird reason, Tyler's air and water quality is better than Longview's. I have no idea why. Oh, maybe it's because Tyler's Superfund Index is higher than the national average as well as Longview's.

Both Tyler and Longview have a higher than average number of doctors per population than the US in general, which is great. Tyler's is significantly higher than the US average, and Longview's is somewhat higher.

Both cities have a shorter than average commute time - also great. Longview's is even shorter than Tyler's!

Longview's median age is a bit higher than Tyler's but both are far below the national average. Longview's number of people per household is slightly higher than Tyler's (with a lower median household income, which is interesting - I just realized that information). Longview has a higher percentage of single parents than Tyler.

This was SUPER interesting: Between 2000 and now, Tyler has grown at nearly double the national average - 22.6 percent (national average is 12.6 percent). Longview's rate of growth was slightly below the national average, at 12.1 percent. I mean, wow - a 22.6 percent rate of growth for Tyler (and this is just the city, not the metro area) is amazing. Between 1990 and now the growth rate for Tyler was an amazing 35.9 percent! (National average is 27.4 - Longview's is 16.9).

Both cities lean conservative. Tyler, while predominately Republican, has a higher percentage of Democrats as well as Independents.

Here's a real interesting tidbit to me - real estate stats. Tyler real estate has appreciated 7.7 percent in the past year, and 26.1 percent in the last ten years. Longview's has DEPRECIATED 12.5 percent in the past year and was up 15 percent over the past ten years.

Longview has a higher property tax rate than Tyler. Both rates are above the national average - HOWEVER, the actual average property tax amounts for both cities are below the national average. Rental costs are both about the same but are lower than the national average.

Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site
Between 1990 and now the growth rate for Tyler was an amazing 35.9 percent! (National average is 27.4 - Longview's is 16.9).

That's almost 30 years, (28) so just over 10% per each decade, or a little over 1% a year, stated that way, IMHO it doesn't look, near the growth rate of many areas of Texas, except of course, the rural areas or counties. I found interesting the population of Smith County, Tyler was 151,309 in 1990 then 230,221 in March 1, 2018 for a growth rate of 52%, growing faster than Tyler's rate, which if you noticed, in each of the last three census's, really, even growing faster than Tyler back thru 1970-1980. Many people want a little piece of property in East Texas, especially Smith County, the acreage tracks have gotten smaller and smaller, due to the higher and higher cost per acre, you think? lol

Last edited by Yac; 08-05-2019 at 03:03 AM..
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:39 AM
 
3,024 posts, read 4,700,462 times
Reputation: 1901
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Oh, I totally agree that Smith County/Tyler is not likely to grow at anywhere near a 50 percent rate, which is why I posted this information.

I want to also point out that 2021 through 2040 (but especially 2021 through 2030) is not that far in the future - it's right around the corner actually. And those are projected COMPLETION dates. On a lot lot lot of projects for Smith County.

On closer look, most of Smith County has a projected 2031-2040 dates, with the exception of 271 and I-20 east to the Gregg County line of 2021-2030 date, according to the detailed map, of I-20. To me, that is too long off, also, these projections are often, extended many years out into the future. Interesting discussion anyway. Today, any construction activity is nearer Dallas.

There are several sites to find, county by county road work. This shows TextDot for East Texas (called Tyler Area)

I could start a completely new post of this:

I just discovered this: F.M 344 overpass was completed around 2010, this article shows pictures from 2009. Stated in the article, anticipated that work for an overpass over F.M 346 WAS anticipated for 2018. Also, an overpass just south of Toll 49 and U.S 69, South Broadway, over F.M. 2493 is tentatively scheduled for 2020 but at the date of this article, 2017, was unfunded. Anyway, all of this will make better travel down South Broadway thru Bullard, plans, one day to go around Jacksonville, as the article has pointed out the need all the way to Beaumont. referring to this route as a "poor man's interstate" lol

Listed for Smith County, of REAL current interest, to me, is the overpass on South Broadway, U.S. 69) being built NOW, over FM 346, to be like the overpass in Bullard, going OVER 344. I hope there are a feeder or access roads as in Bullard.

I accidentally found this, I wonder what all the construction was at F.M By the way, this is where I understand projections of completion dates are not often made. When Bullard's overpass construction was announced, at that time years ago, the construction of 69 over F.M. 346 was to START immediately upon completion of the overpass over F.M 344 in Bullard, well, what, 10 years later, the overpass over F.M. 346 has started, ANTICIPATED to be completed in the fall of 2020, per the attached timetable.

https://www.ksla.com/2019/07/22/east...ork-week-july/

Last edited by Mark Senior; 07-28-2019 at 11:03 AM..
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