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Old 06-26-2009, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,728,327 times
Reputation: 6680

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Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
The issue of Texas having mountains is an example of this inflated sense of state pride which I will clarify. If I lived in Texas, I would never contradict someone who claimed Texas doesn't have mountains. I understand what they mean. Places like Colorado, Washington, California, and even Arizona have mountains that people regularly use. They hike and ski on them. There are well established cities or communities on or near them. Texas doesn't have that. In LA, Phoenix and Seattle, you can drive after work and go skiing in the same day in the winter; can you do that in Houston, Dallas or San Antonio? But of course, a Texan gets defensive and claims they have mountains even though they are tiny, located in a remote area of the state that is sparsely populated or isn't used in the same sense that these other states use it.

If someone criticized California by saying it's too expensive, I wouldn't contradict them by desperately alluding to some remote area of California that has a cheaper cost of living. There are areas like that in California and I could cite them but I won't because I understand the general point the person was making. Yes, California is expensive. That's one of the negatives of California. Likewise, Texas doens't have mountains yet the Texan feels the need to cite some rare example just to contradict a technical point. The reason the Texan does this is because they have this overwhelming sense of state pride. It's just funny to hear the Texans deny it now

If you live in the Panhandle, you can drive to Colorado and go skiing. However, Skiing isn't a big popular thing for us Texans anyway, so we'll live.
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Old 06-26-2009, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,728,327 times
Reputation: 6680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathy4017 View Post
I worked in MS for 6 months on a temporary assignment. I had a hard time understanding the natives when I was there. A Texas accent sounds NOTHING like MS to my ear. MS is very, very southern, to the core.

Texas has some southern elements, but it's not what I'd consider a southern (culturally-speaking) state.
I don't understand how Texans sound like MS. You don't even have to be from Texas to hear that.
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Old 06-26-2009, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
8,815 posts, read 12,101,016 times
Reputation: 4278
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I don't understand how Texans sound like MS. You don't even have to be from Texas to hear that.
True.

No comments here in south central NM on whatever Texas accent I may have after having been born, raised and lived there over 50 years.

Now TexasReb is going to come along and....
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Old 06-26-2009, 07:55 PM
Status: "Semi-retired. On and off line interchangeably" (set 5 days ago)
 
9,821 posts, read 11,174,193 times
Reputation: 5031
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathy4017 View Post
I worked in MS for 6 months on a temporary assignment. I had a hard time understanding the natives when I was there. A Texas accent sounds NOTHING like MS to my ear. MS is very, very southern, to the core.
Here is a pretty good quote I came across on a website speaking of differences in varities of Southern American English (of which "Texas tawk" is definitely part). Kinda sums it up in way which oughta satisfy everyone. LOL

Southerners sound mostly alike to non-Southern ears, but a native has no trouble distinguishing a mountain accent from one hailing from the Tidewater area of Virginia. The Southern accent is deceptively complex, borrowing as it does from the British accent, Scottish “burr” and Irish “brogue,” the Cherokee language, and mixed with slurred French intonations and staccato Spanish and spiced with African-American speech.

I like that. And it is very true.

Quote:
Texas has some southern elements, but it's not what I'd consider a southern (culturally-speaking) state.
And of course you know I feel much different, my dear friend Cathy! BUT...at LEAST it seems that this thread hasn't taken that old and absolutely deepest depth dives into regional affiliation per se! I'd like to bury THAT one under the mequite, pecan and pine trees of Texas. LOL

Last edited by TexasReb; 06-26-2009 at 08:45 PM..
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Old 06-26-2009, 07:57 PM
Status: "Semi-retired. On and off line interchangeably" (set 5 days ago)
 
9,821 posts, read 11,174,193 times
Reputation: 5031
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathy4017 View Post
True.

No comments here in south central NM on whatever Texas accent I may have after having been born, raised and lived there over 50 years.

Now TexasReb is going to come along and....
I'll be dammed! LOL
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Old 06-26-2009, 08:17 PM
Status: "Semi-retired. On and off line interchangeably" (set 5 days ago)
 
9,821 posts, read 11,174,193 times
Reputation: 5031
Quote:
Originally Posted by drshang View Post
Texas is obsessed with California. California couldn't give a crap about Texas.
Californians seem to keep moving here though, don't they? How many Texans are moving to California anymore?
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Old 06-26-2009, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,415 posts, read 22,669,093 times
Reputation: 12606
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I'll be dammed! LOL
Well, it IS predictable, you know!
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Old 06-26-2009, 08:39 PM
Status: "Semi-retired. On and off line interchangeably" (set 5 days ago)
 
9,821 posts, read 11,174,193 times
Reputation: 5031
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Well, it IS predictable, you know!

LOL Seems like you and me have mutually predictable crystal balls, doncha reckon?

Last edited by TexasReb; 06-26-2009 at 08:58 PM..
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Old 06-26-2009, 09:51 PM
 
Location: North Dallas/West Campus, Austin
1,562 posts, read 2,705,977 times
Reputation: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
The issue of Texas having mountains is an example of this inflated sense of state pride which I will clarify. If I lived in Texas, I would never contradict someone who claimed Texas doesn't have mountains. I understand what they mean. Places like Colorado, Washington, California, and even Arizona have mountains that people regularly use. They hike and ski on them. There are well established cities or communities on or near them. Texas doesn't have that. In LA, Phoenix and Seattle, you can drive after work and go skiing in the same day in the winter; can you do that in Houston, Dallas or San Antonio? But of course, a Texan gets defensive and claims they have mountains even though they are tiny, located in a remote area of the state that is sparsely populated or isn't used in the same sense that these other states use it.

If someone criticized California by saying it's too expensive, I wouldn't contradict them by desperately alluding to some remote area of California that has a cheaper cost of living. There are areas like that in California and I could cite them but I won't because I understand the general point the person was making. Yes, California is expensive. That's one of the negatives of California. Likewise, Texas doens't have mountains yet the Texan feels the need to cite some rare example just to contradict a technical point. The reason the Texan does this is because they have this overwhelming sense of state pride. It's just funny to hear the Texans deny it now
I'm sorry our mountains aren't what you are looking for. Why don't you go talk about the mountains you like on some other forum, like Colorado or "Cali" or "Zona" or Canada or Zimbabwe or Iran or someplace else that you like better?

What the point of strapping pieces of fibreglass to your feet and sliding on some hellfire (I firmly belive hell is freezing) is beyond me. If you do it on water, though, it's damn fun!

The fact is, that while our mountains may not be what you're looking for, it's a flat out lie to say that Texas doesn't have mountains. In fact, almost every geographical feature and in the United States can be found in some part of Texas.

It's a big diverse state, and you have to drive to ALL the "remote areas" to get to know it.

"Everything's bigger in Texas" isn't someone bragging, it's simply a statement of fact. For the most part, things come bigger here, whether they're good or bad. I don't see what the hell all the fuss you're making is about.
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Old 06-26-2009, 09:55 PM
 
Location: North Dallas/West Campus, Austin
1,562 posts, read 2,705,977 times
Reputation: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canine*Castle View Post
It's very noticeable indeed. When I moved here, I could not understand southern talk to save my soul, but I'm used to it now. If dropping the "g" were the only thing, it would be easy to decipher. You must buy the Texas Dictionary. It is an absolute riot. My mom bought it decades ago and she and I would absolutely crack up. My brother-in-law, a native T didn't find it funny, but I really don't think he "got it." My native Texas friend found it hilarious, but he has learned not to talk with an accent nor does he butcher simple words. To this day, I laugh so hard when I read that book, my side hurts. Of course, the graphics make it even funnier.
Where in Texas are you that people speak "Southern talk?" The only large towns I can think of where they sound particularly Southern are Tyler and Longview/Marshall.

Even the natives in Dallas and Houston are much less pronounced than the Deep South, and have some "twang" of Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina where so many of our forefathers came from. It ain't much compared to most Southern areas.

I, for one, am always shocked when people tell me I sound particularly "country" or "Texan" or "Southern." I know people who sound "Southern" and they put my accent to shame.

I do wish we sounded more like southern Georgia did, but we can't have everything, I guess.
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