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Old 07-02-2010, 07:21 AM
 
2,582 posts, read 2,205,872 times
Reputation: 1673
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuckInTexas View Post
Having lived and/or worked in all these cities, here is my take...

I would say in order of preference:

1) Austin
2) Dallas or San Antonio about equal
3) Houston (too big, too ugly, too polluted, too humid, hurricane factor, too rainy, but best economy)
I agree with most of your post but why does everybody love to call all of Houston ugly? Houston is not ugly in the TMC area, downtown, Uptown, or especially along the new Katy Freeway/West Houston Energy Corridor. What's wrong with those areas? Even Dallas doesn't look all that along every corridor and I'm talking along I35. San Antonio and Austin sure don't either.
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Old 07-02-2010, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Houston Inner Loop
659 posts, read 696,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C2H (ComingtoHouston) View Post
I agree with most of your post but why does everybody love to call all of Houston ugly? Houston is not ugly in the TMC area, downtown, Uptown, or especially along the new Katy Freeway/West Houston Energy Corridor. What's wrong with those areas? Even Dallas doesn't look all that along every corridor and I'm talking along I35. San Antonio and Austin sure don't either.
Because they base their perceptions on a very limited, myopic experience. Most of the people that have visited "Houston" have probably not done much but drive on I-45 then Beltway 8 to their relatives in a master planned community and then never ventured into the actual city itself...

And, you're right, no other city in Texas can begin to touch the modernity of the updated Katy Freeway. E.g., Central Expressway in Dallas is a joke compared to 10 West in Houston.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Houston Inner Loop
659 posts, read 696,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladarron View Post
I don't think Houston will become really dense.
Probably not by Northeast standards, but the densest pockets in Houston are already denser than anything in any other Texas city. I doubt those dense areas are going to become less dense.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:06 AM
 
116 posts, read 229,119 times
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I lived in Houston for 20 years, so have seen every part. I'm taking outdoorsy scenery not how the architecture looks. I see nothing special about I-10 going out of Houston, but yah Houston has some cool buildings and modern architecture simply because there are a lot more there because of its size. Dallas has a fairly ugly downtown area from afar, but some cool areas inside the city, and some of the suburbs are nice.

I am not basing it on how the buildings or the downtown or city area itself looks, if we base it on that then yes - Houston is one of the better looking cities. Dallas is no gem either, but there are scenic areas not too far away.

All cities get boring after a while and you just want something different, hence the expression could use a change of scenery.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:44 AM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,968 posts, read 8,393,284 times
Reputation: 3271
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuckInTexas View Post
I lived in Houston for 20 years, so have seen every part. I'm taking outdoorsy scenery not how the architecture looks. I see nothing special about I-10 going out of Houston, but yah Houston has some cool buildings and modern architecture simply because there are a lot more there because of its size. Dallas has a fairly ugly downtown area from afar, but some cool areas inside the city, and some of the suburbs are nice.

I am not basing it on how the buildings or the downtown or city area itself looks, if we base it on that then yes - Houston is one of the better looking cities. Dallas is no gem either, but there are scenic areas not too far away.

All cities get boring after a while and you just want something different, hence the expression could use a change of scenery.
Have you not been around Conroe? You don't think the rolling terrain and pine forests look nice? Dallas has nothing like that. Then, there is the Bay and beaches on the other side of the metro. Not to mention many very nice neighborhoods in and around the Inner Loop.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:53 AM
 
2,582 posts, read 2,205,872 times
Reputation: 1673
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuckInTexas View Post
I am not basing it on how the buildings or the downtown or city area itself looks, if we base it on that then yes - Houston is one of the better looking cities. Dallas is no gem either, but there are scenic areas not too far away.

All cities get boring after a while and you just want something different, hence the expression could use a change of scenery.
I feel just the opposite. I think Dallas is the better looking city when it comes to architecture and actual buildings and infrastructure (for the most part). The TMC in Houston and Uptown/Galleria, and the new Memorial City area are no slouch either. Downtown Houston could stand to update or tear down some of the buildings that are just sitting there boarded up, but east downtown is developing quite nicely. I think Houston's advantage over Dallas is its natural vegetation and trees and greener natural environemnt. That's where I think Houston is better looking.

Last edited by stoneclaw; 07-02-2010 at 10:02 AM..
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:20 AM
 
165 posts, read 22,041 times
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Because in DALLAS we get things done

Twenty-four Fortune 500 companies have their headquarters in North Texas. Last year, those companies brought in $623 billion in revenue—second to only New York. And though the region occupies only 3 percent of the state’s landmass, we have 26 percent of the population, 28 percent of the employment, 29 percent of the personal income, and 32 percent of Texas’ gross domestic product. How did we pull off all that? Our cost of living is below the national average of 100 (Dallas is at 91.9) and the median home price is $150,000 (lower than Atlanta, Houston, and Minneapolis). Plus, we’re educated: 20 colleges and universities, 17 graduate schools, three medical and dental schools, two law schools, and 20 community college campuses. (All figures courtesy of the North Texas Commission.)

Because in DALLAS We Have the Most Interesting Sports Owners in the Country

We’re not contending that the three owners of our four professional sports teams are the best in the country. Tom Hicks’ stewardship of the Texas Rangers alone is enough to severely compromise the integrity of that argument. But interesting? No stable of owners in any city can even remotely compete with the triumvirate of Hicks (Rangers and Stars), Mark Cuban (Mavericks), and Jerry Jones (Cowboys). Cuban gets fined for comments he makes via Twitter and regularly conducts interviews astride a StairMaster. Jones is a quote factory (sample product: “I’ve had all the fire knocked out of my butt tonight”) and makes the nightlife rounds with his expensive dress shirts unbuttoned to the navel. And Hicks? He’s despised on two continents and is currently stiff-arming creditors. Not as fun as the other two, but still riveting.

Because Jack Kilby(from Dallas) invented the future

GPS devices, cellphones, laptops, the Internet—let’s just skip to the end and say “modern life as we know it.” That’s what the late Jack Kilby made possible when he constructed the first working integrated circuit (better known as a microchip) in a lab at Texas Instruments in the summer of 1958. The discovery earned Kilby the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physics, but he deserves more. Consider this: in the 2007 film adaptation of Transformers, the invention of the microchip is attributed to reverse-engineering by teams of scientists studying an alien robot and an ancient, colossal power cube of mysterious provenance—and it makes complete and total sense. That’s how brain-melting Kilby’s accomplishment remains.

Because DALLAS is the Hollywood of Reality TV

In August 2008, four North Texans won reality shows: Joshua Allen (Fort Worth) won So You Think You Can Dance, Iliza Shlesinger (Dallas) won Last Comic Standing, Ally Davidson (Dallas) won American Gladiators, and Melissa Lawson (Arlington) won Nashville Star. This was not an anomaly. Even a partial list of notable North Texas reality contestants—everyone from the original Survivor (Colby Donaldson) to notable foodies (Lisa Garza,Tre Wilcox, Casey Thompson) to sportsy folks (Terrell Owens, Emmitt Smith, Michael Irvin, Mark Cuban) to a grab-bag of big names (Carolyn Shamis, Craig Watkins, Jessica Simpson, Jay McGraw) to the entire Dallas SWAT team—shows that we provide great (and sometimes cringe-worthy) television.

Because in DALLAS Some Things Really Are Bigger Here

The new Cowboys stadium (so named until Jerry Jones secures a naming-rights deal) features a pair of arches that extend across the entire arena. At almost 300 feet long each, both are bigger than the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. The stadium itself is 3 million square feet. It features the largest and longest retractable roof extant, the biggest functional glass door, and an HD video scoreboard hanging in the center that practically spans the length of the playing field. In other words: it’s a physical manifestation of every stereotype people have about Texas in general and Dallas specifically, in the most awesome way possible.

However, if you’ve been to a Texas Rangers game recently, you probably have a vague sense of the impending traffic apocalypse that is about to settle on the area every home-game Sunday for the foreseeable future. According to the official stadium site, seating capacity is 80,000 and expandable up to 100,000. Also according to the site, it is “estimated” that there will be 30,000 parking spaces available around the facility. Which, okay, whatever. Most people ride with someone else or maybe a few someones. But the streets around the stadium, which happen to be the same streets that surround Rangers Ballpark, simply cannot handle that kind of traffic. They can barely handle Rangers fans. Better hope the Cowboys have a lot of home wins this season, because you’re going to have a long drive home to think about the games.

Because in DALLAS we embrace home-grown restaurants

People always talk about what a great restaurant town Las Vegas is, because every New York big-concept eatery opens and succeeds there. Really? That’s a great restaurant town’s m.o.? We don’t think so. We demand more than a high-profile name and a glitzy opening. That’s why so many flashy dining options (think N9NE, Nove, and Il Mulino) here have failed. We do embrace quality, though, and we take care of those high-profile chefs who provide tremendous food and who clearly love the city. Stephan Pyles, Dean Fearing, Kent Rathbun, Avner Samuel, Sharon Hage, Graham Dodds, dozens more—these are the people who reward us with wonderful food, simply and lovingly prepared, and we in turn give them our business. It’s why we’re a great restaurant town.

Because in DALLAS we love our dogs more than ourselves

If you disagree with that sentiment, you clearly haven’t been to Unleashed Indoor Dog Parks, the well-appointed facility Cody and Kelly Acree opened on Samuell Boulevard in late March. Dogs roam over 50,000 square feet of artificial grass (and another 2.5 acres of real stuff outside), under the watchful eye of dog handlers walking the beat, ready to snuff out any fights. (By the way, for insurance reasons, pit bulls aren’t allowed.) And there are plans to build a canine water park on the grounds as well. Owners, meanwhile, are treated to coffee, wifi, gourmet sandwiches, and someone watching their dogs for them—for a fee, of course—while they enjoy all that. Okay, so maybe it’s a tie.

Because in DALLAS we love a good fight

Every month, it seems, there is a new cause célèbre, another matter of future-defining consequence to deal with. Sometimes it actually is something worth arguing (the Trinity River project, the convention center hotel) and sometimes it just feels that way at the time (renaming Ross Avenue after Cesar Chavez, the orientation of the Lakewood Whole Foods). The issue at hand, of course, never really matters. We just love to pick a side, dig a trench, and start lobbing grenades. And then do it all again next month.

Because NorthPark is…

A fantastic art gallery:
From the huge (48 feet tall, 12 tons) orange steel sculpture Ad Astra to the works Three Places (bottom), 1983 and Corridor Pin, Blue to the center itself (twice given awards by the American Institute of Architects), it’s always been a home to great design and art.

A babysitter: On a Friday night, we drop the tweens off at the AMC Theaters 15 and go downstairs to have cocktails and dinner. And, from the crush of kids roaming the theaters, we know you do, too.

A library: Bookmarks, part of the Dallas Public Library, is a nearly 2,000-square-foot library for kids 12 and under.
A quiet space: CenterPark, the gorgeous outdoor space in the mall’s center, is a wonderful spot to relax, attend parties, or contemplate how much you just spent at Nordstrom.

And, oh, yeah, a great place to shop: The stores (everything from Barneys New York to Ted Baker of London, from Forever XXI to Nine West) speak for themselves.

DALLAS IS MUCH BETTER THAN HOUSTON
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:23 AM
 
165 posts, read 22,041 times
Reputation: 15
Dallas is what you think you don’t want, early on, but then you discover, yeah, actually, you do. You may visit much larger, much glitzier cities with their winning sports teams and their non-endangered levies and their silly, silly hotels owned by companies that aren’t cities, but Dallas is home. You turn onto LBJ, and then onto Inwood or Preston, and you get that little, tiny thrill when you see the downtown skyline rising up in the distance, even as you’re driving through neighborhoods shaded by large trees
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:45 AM
 
165 posts, read 22,041 times
Reputation: 15
Elie Tahari, Omega, Gregory's, and Gucci are opening in Northpark Center soon. YAY

2 stores that are the first in Texas

and Dallas having a second Gucci.

Houston is not competion for Dallas in Fashion.
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Old 07-02-2010, 12:01 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,968 posts, read 8,393,284 times
Reputation: 3271
kate_she, when is your next show at the Improv?
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