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Old 03-19-2012, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,596 posts, read 4,310,459 times
Reputation: 1372

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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo2000 View Post
No its not. And thats one of the reasons why it will never be accepted into an athletic conference such as the Big 10 (which is comprised of all past or current AAU member schools). Nebraska recently had its AAU membership revoked but will likely regain it in the future.

These are the member schools with the dates of acceptance

Association of American Universities
My apologies... I figured OU had AAU membership...I know the PAC 12 was willing to take OU but they did not want OKST because of its poor academics.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
2,241 posts, read 1,501,326 times
Reputation: 1127
Quote:
Originally Posted by llmrkc07 View Post
That does not look better than East Texas and you know that. Why do you guys always make North Texas seem more than what it is?? Its nice but come on guy...better than the Piney Woods in East Texas...NO.
People in Dallas ALWAYS seem to think they are bigger and better than Houston. It's like really? Talk about delusion.
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Old 03-19-2012, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
1,492 posts, read 1,419,002 times
Reputation: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Kenshi, I'm not saying the TF isn't impressive, but I doubt most people would consider it more beautiful than East Texas.
I simply stated it as my opinion and even said it may be because I lived in East Texas almost all my life and am used to the scenery there that I find the GTF more beautiful. That other guy implied I was lying to make Dallas, where I've lived for a year, look better than East Texas, where I lived for 29 years.
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Old 03-19-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,911,689 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenshi View Post
I simply stated it as my opinion and even said it may be because I lived in East Texas almost all my life and am used to the scenery there that I find the GTF more beautiful. That other guy implied I was lying to make Dallas, where I've lived for a year, look better than East Texas, where I lived for 29 years.
Yes, I understand all of that.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,596 posts, read 4,310,459 times
Reputation: 1372
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenshi View Post
I simply stated it as my opinion and even said it may be because I lived in East Texas almost all my life and am used to the scenery there that I find the GTF more beautiful. That other guy implied I was lying to make Dallas, where I've lived for a year, look better than East Texas, where I lived for 29 years.
I understand where you are coming from. I find North Texas beautiful at times also. North Texans take good pride in their prairies, hills, lakes and cross timbers...I love the mixture of wooded grassy areas north Texas has to offer.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
1,492 posts, read 1,419,002 times
Reputation: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
I understand where you are coming from. I find North Texas beautiful at times also. North Texans take good pride in their prairies, hills, lakes and cross timbers...I love the mixture of wooded grassy areas north Texas has to offer.
Yeah. Arbor Hills has two different types of forests and prairie. I love hiking there. In East Texas, there are pine forests and cow pastures.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:29 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,911,689 times
Reputation: 4853
DFW is practically part of the Great Plains, so I guess it makes sense that it would be "grassier" than areas that are further east. I don't know if that's actually the case, though.

But East Texas is hard to beat. I guess I can understand how someone who is from there would be less than amused by it, but for most, it's a definitely a wonderful sight.

Davy Crockett National Forest | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jgrady/814380608/ - broken link)
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,596 posts, read 4,310,459 times
Reputation: 1372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
DFW is practically part of the Great Plains, so I guess it makes sense that it would be "grassier" than areas that are further east. I don't know if that's actually the case, though.

But East Texas is hard to beat. I guess I can understand how someone who is from there would be less than amused by it, but for most, it's a definitely a wonderful sight.

Davy Crockett National Forest | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jgrady/814380608/ - broken link)
If you notice the trees in east Texas are taller and denser...It’s hard for sun light to peak through those trees...as result grass isn't very common in wooded areas in East Texas. That’s one huge thing I noticed about Atlanta. They have these big beautiful trees and older homes but no grass...They usually substitute grass with mulch pine needles. Texans should be proud of the diversity of different vegetation we have in the state.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:57 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,911,689 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
If you notice the trees in east Texas are taller and denser...It’s hard for sun light to peak through those trees...as result grass isn't very common in wooded areas in East Texas. That’s one huge thing I noticed about Atlanta. They have these big beautiful trees and older homes but no grass...They usually substitute grass with mulch pine needles. Texans should be proud of the diversity of different vegetation we have in the state.
They do have grass in Atlanta, but just like East Texas, it's mixed in with a lot of acidic sand and clay.
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
3,596 posts, read 4,310,459 times
Reputation: 1372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
They do have grass in Atlanta, but just like East Texas, it's mixed in with a lot of acidic sand and clay.
Nobody literally stated Atlanta doesn't have grass. Did you read the post? Any area thats gets adequate sun light can have grass. Show me an area of the southeast that is heavily forested without much sunlight that has grass.
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