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Old 04-30-2009, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
2,908 posts, read 3,260,404 times
Reputation: 3138
Default Looking For Driest Climate in Texas for Daughter With Severe Midwest Allergies Please

We currently live in SE Michigan. Just over a year ago, our 15 yo daughter was diagnosed with severe allergies to just about everything that is indigenous to our area including dust mites, environmental molds, maple trees, etc. She is miserable and has been to eight doctors, with none of them finding any medication that has helped her at all. When she visits a dry climate such as in the desert Southwest, she is perfectly fine and has no symptoms whatsoever.

My husband works for Coca-Cola Enterprises and needs to remain with them for at least five more years to collect his pension at 55, not to mention that finding a new job with another company in this economy and at 49 years old would be daunting, to say the least.

All of that said, my husband has been trying unsuccessfully for over a month to get transferred to the Coca-Cola plant in Tempe, AZ and has bid on three jobs there that he is qualified to do. For whatever reason, even though he has an excellent work record, Tempe will not give him the time of day. We have checked in other cities in the desert SW such as Albuquerque, Las Vegas, etc. and CC has no jobs posted in those cities for which he is qualified.

Bottom line: Coca-Cola always has a ton of job openings in Texas, so if we end up not getting transferred to AZ, NM, or NV, what cities in Texas have a climate that would be the most similar to the desert SW climate? I think that I can safely assume that places such as Houston and Dallas have very high humidity and therefore would be a bad, bad choice for our daughter. What about Lubbock, Amarillo, or El Paso? We're not crazy about the idea of going to El Paso because of all of the trouble in Mexico right now, but at this point would consider just about anywhere and would like to be settled in before the next school year begins. We have already sold our house here and will have closed on it by May 30 and are looking to move after our son graduates from high school in June. Any and all suggestions are welcome.

Thanks!!!
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Old 04-30-2009, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Tyler Texas
17 posts, read 33,776 times
Reputation: 16
Probably going to be Alpine/Marfa/Fort Davis Area and I've seen CC posting jobs in that general area

Good Luck
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
2,747 posts, read 3,567,143 times
Reputation: 2658
Be sure to do your due diligence. There are plenty of allergens in drier climes. Not sure how prevalent sagebrush is in west Texas but it's a notorious allergen, as are cottonwood trees.
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:49 AM
 
Location: El Paso
271 posts, read 456,836 times
Reputation: 174
Don't be so quick to discount El Paso the violence is in Mexico and our city is one of the safest in the nation. My son was on allergy injections in NC and has no problems here.
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Old 04-30-2009, 01:54 PM
 
1,473 posts, read 1,562,144 times
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One possible drawback for El Paso is that it has tree pollen in the spring that seems to affect a large percentage of the population. Lubbock or Amarillo might be a little better in that regard.
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Old 05-01-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Center Twp, PA
469 posts, read 917,668 times
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You are great parents to do this for your child! I too, am an allergy sufferer along with asthma.

I lived in Marfa, TX for 3 years and my allergies were much better there. Not perfect, but better. I also lived in El Paso for 1 1/2 years, but this was back in 1995. Again, the dryer climate did help. I can't recall how much better my allergies were, but I do remember a significant improvement. One thing about El Paso, it gets HOT in the summer.

I hope that you all will be able to visit any areas of interest before making a change. I lived in Gibraltar, MI for a while, and the Texas heat will take some getting used to. No real four seasons. I will tell you I loved the climate in Marfa. It does not get too hot in the summer, and as soon as the sun goes down, the temps go down. I would sometimes have to wear a light jacket when going for a walk at night - during the summer!

I wish you the best of luck in your search and I hope you will get to relocate soon!

~Stephanie
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Old 05-01-2009, 11:21 AM
Status: "Slappin' at Mosquitos" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: League City TX
1,564 posts, read 1,480,631 times
Reputation: 2377
Not to burst your bubble, but if your child has a tendency to allergies she will eventually develop them anywhere you go as soon as she is sensitized to the local pollens, etc. The reason she's been ok in the past in the southwest was because she just wasn't used to the local allergens. We had severe allergy symptoms in El Paso--there is a lot of wind blown dust and mulberry pollen around. Other places in Texas have a big problem with cedar, as well. IMHO--I would consult an allergy specialist before relocating across the country.
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:14 PM
 
88 posts, read 234,851 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
Not to burst your bubble, but if your child has a tendency to allergies she will eventually develop them anywhere you go as soon as she is sensitized to the local pollens, etc. The reason she's been ok in the past in the southwest was because she just wasn't used to the local allergens. We had severe allergy symptoms in El Paso--there is a lot of wind blown dust and mulberry pollen around. Other places in Texas have a big problem with cedar, as well. IMHO--I would consult an allergy specialist before relocating across the country.
That isn't necessarily true. It is common to develop allergies after settling to a new climate, but not necessarily going to happen, and especially not necessarily going to reach the same extent as it does in a worse climate for allergens. Dust mites for example, are a very common and persistent allergen - the only way to avoid them is to live in a climate where the air is too dry for them to survive. No dust mites, no dust mite reaction. But your point is still valid - a person can feel great visiting a place, but put a huge personal investment into moving there, and ending up just as sick as before.

On each city's page on city-data, there is a graph that shows average humidity levels throughout the year, along with other climate information. Try comparing stats on those pages.
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Old 05-01-2009, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
2,908 posts, read 3,260,404 times
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Thanks to all of you for taking the time to respond. According to both of the allergists that we have taken our daughter to, dust mites are the main culprit in her case, so that must be why the vast improvement when she is in a place like Phoenix.

Stephanie P.,

Thanks for the compliment, but really, we are just trying to do what I would hope any parent would do under the circumstances. Her quality of life is truly to the point where we have to do something. At this point, her eyes bother her so much that she has to be homeschooled because she spends every waking day alternating between applying compresses to her eyes and instilling artificial tears from the time she gets up until the time she goes to bed. No po allergy medicine (even prescription strength) even touches it, and the best our doctor could promise with allergy shots is that it would take at least 9 mo. to a year of taking shots twice a week to see any difference, and that's IF the shots are even effective. At this point, we feel like we have no choice but to move. The Phoenix area is our first choice, but we aren't naive enough to move without having secured employment, not to mention that we couldn't buy a house with no reportable income, and the job market in Phoenix is stagnant, to say the least. For whatever reason, I keep reading that Texas has survived this recession/depression better than most other states. I hope that indicates that my husband can get transferred there with Coca-Cola easier than he has been able to in Phoenix. (BTW, LOVE your location description, lol!!!)
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Old 05-02-2009, 08:34 AM
 
40,871 posts, read 42,017,499 times
Reputation: 12247
You really do need to do your homework. I had worse allergies in Las vegas than in a more moist climates. In dry areas the dust and pollen can really get blown around very easily.Good luck
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