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Old 05-25-2009, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Southern California
3,371 posts, read 4,644,815 times
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Being from the north, in my opinion anything around San Antonio/Austin and west of there is pretty low humidity. If you just drive west from San Antonio toward El Paso you can see the terrain gradually becoming more desert like. Doesn't take a scientist to figure the general humidity must gradually change from that point west as well.

San Antonio is low humidity to me, though it gets humid. It's not nearly as bad or constant as what I am used to in the summers up north. I know its been dry the past year and they have some more humid years...but still, that is not like the constant humidity I am used to in the summer.

Anyway, all of Texas is definitly not humid! I think, just as the general pattern in this part of the country (the middle) there is a general progression. East Texas is going to be more swampy and humid, while the west part like El Paso is pretty much Desert Southwest. And obviously, the further north is going to be colder, the further south is going to be warmer.

There are lots of little towns between SA and El Paso .... I would not limit myself to El Paso. It's a pretty big region that is fairly dry and not so humid. Obviously, the further west, the less humid.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
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Being from the north, in my opinion anything around San Antonio/Austin and west of there is pretty low humidity.

It very defintely depends on what you're used to.....San Antonio, Austin and vicinity are like a sauna to me. You don't even begin to get reduced levels (except during an unusual drought for an area) until you get west of Abilene.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Southern California
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yes, I was very puzzled when I moved here....when people kept saying it was "humid" definitley last summer was what I consider hot and dry with the occasional hurricaine induced thunderstorm, and it was humid for a few days after that. It was humid yesterday too, but not so hot. It was actually pretty sticky, but not that bad in my opinion considering it did rain.

It is hotter here than up north, so any moderate humidity is going to feel gross. But, I would consider the San Antonio area more like a sauna...than a steam bath but yes compared to Arizona, definitley humid. Compared to Iowa or Illinois or for that matter, Florida in the summer...not so humid.
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Old 05-25-2009, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
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Central Texas is also in the middle of an unusual drought, with water restrictions--that is almost unheard of for that area. Austin and vicinity's "normal" rainfall is around 36 inches a year.

I avoid visiting in the summer because of the humidity, though it is down from years past....I have a sister who has lived out there for over 30 years, so I've been there off and on in all seasons for that length of time.
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Old 05-25-2009, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Southern California
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I've read that rainfall average (at least for San Antonio) is just that, an average. What I think is unique about this area, is that its really on the line between the humid tropical south and the desert west. So you have years of extreme drought and years that are more tropical. Some years you get 30 incehs of rain and some years you get 10 inches. It's not predictable like it is northeast or like California where its always pretty much the same every day.
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Old 05-25-2009, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
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Unpredictable just about says it all, LOL!!

California is a neat state, but the sameness in the weather in San Diego and LA would bore me to tears! I love the changing of the seasons!
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Old 05-25-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Down the road a bit
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I had relatives from Minnesota down to visit two summers ago, and they just about couldn't stand the humidity in our backyard -- and they live right near the Mississippi River. They said it's humid at home, but this was a whole different Sweat Fest!
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
50,056 posts, read 42,397,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgb123 View Post
Being from the north, in my opinion anything around San Antonio/Austin and west of there is pretty low humidity. If you just drive west from San Antonio toward El Paso you can see the terrain gradually becoming more desert like. Doesn't take a scientist to figure the general humidity must gradually change from that point west as well.

San Antonio is low humidity to me, though it gets humid. It's not nearly as bad or constant as what I am used to in the summers up north. I know its been dry the past year and they have some more humid years...but still, that is not like the constant humidity I am used to in the summer.

Anyway, all of Texas is definitly not humid! I think, just as the general pattern in this part of the country (the middle) there is a general progression. East Texas is going to be more swampy and humid, while the west part like El Paso is pretty much Desert Southwest. And obviously, the further north is going to be colder, the further south is going to be warmer.

There are lots of little towns between SA and El Paso .... I would not limit myself to El Paso. It's a pretty big region that is fairly dry and not so humid. Obviously, the further west, the less humid.
anything west of SAn Antonio and Austin is low humidity, you must be kidding? The OP is looking for really low, even El Paso might be a bit too high. Sure, coming from the north you might see it differently but all of Texas is humid to a degree.

Nita
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
50,056 posts, read 42,397,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathy4017 View Post
Being from the north, in my opinion anything around San Antonio/Austin and west of there is pretty low humidity.

It very defintely depends on what you're used to.....San Antonio, Austin and vicinity are like a sauna to me. You don't even begin to get reduced levels (except during an unusual drought for an area) until you get west of Abilene.
I totally agree with you. Even when living in Dallas we thought Austin and San Antonio were humid.
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Old 05-25-2009, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Southern California
3,371 posts, read 4,644,815 times
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SA is not that humid to me, at all. But that wasn't my point. My point was, that the general trend as you go west of SA is that it dries out, the closer you get to El Paso. It is gradual, and evident by the landscape. My point was, El Paso is not the ONLY possibility, and that the climate changes gradually from East Texas to West Texas. The climate zone map someone posted is a good illustration of this.
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