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Old 06-29-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Northeast Texas
816 posts, read 1,938,058 times
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Wow, those pictures are disturbing. Reminds me of the movie "House Wax" or something like that.

Imagine going through there at night and your engine just broke.

Thanks for sharing those pictures.
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
9,249 posts, read 26,579,993 times
Reputation: 2851
Fabulous pictures! Thanks for posting and hope to see more. You just gave me motivation to check out some near me....
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Old 06-29-2009, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,560 posts, read 1,257,958 times
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Hello,

Love your photos. I've been wanting to make a visit to Bradshaw and Belle Plain sometime; seeing your pics made me want to do it even more. Here are some photos of the ghost town of Clairemont, which is a ways northeast of Abilene in Kent County. It was the county seat until 1954 when it lost a countywide election to Jayton, which had a more reliable source of water. Like Bradshaw, a significant amount of structures remain in Clairemont including the bottom floor of the 1888 courthouse and matching jail, and the former Kent County Fairgrounds. There are still about 15 people living in the area, but for all intents and purposes it is a total ghost. I recommend a trip if you have the time; the next time I am in the area I plan on shooting some video.



































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Old 07-02-2009, 02:57 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
47 posts, read 374,252 times
Reputation: 98
I've totally been to Clairemont. I just didn't post pictures because I went with a friend and it was more of a random photoshoot of us than an actual ghost town documentary. It was my first ghost town actually. Quite a fun trip, albeit a bit far (90 minutes each way). Great pics!
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Old 07-02-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,560 posts, read 1,257,958 times
Reputation: 1424
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestTexan87 View Post
I've totally been to Clairemont. I just didn't post pictures because I went with a friend and it was more of a random photoshoot of us than an actual ghost town documentary. It was my first ghost town actually. Quite a fun trip, albeit a bit far (90 minutes each way). Great pics!
Thank you. I plan on making another visit at the end of this month on my way back home to Lubbock to attend a wedding. I was thinking about shooting some video this time, as well.
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Old 12-08-2009, 12:13 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
47 posts, read 374,252 times
Reputation: 98
Default Burkett, Texas - Population: 30 and falling

Originally named Pleasant Valley, the name was first rejected by postal authorities since it was already taken. When the application was resubmitted it bore the name of postmaster William Burkett. The year was 1886 and the "settlers" were mostly cowboys of the McClennan ranch, who established a community around H. Sackett's store.

By 1940 the town had a thriving population of 200 along with five businesses. The high school consolidated in 1957 with the Coleman and Cross Plains ISDs and the population declined accordingly. By the 1980s Burkett still had their post office, a community center, a gas station, and cemetery.

---Town story courtesy of TexasEscapes.com

After turning off of route 206, the first thing you pass in Burkett is the sprawling cemetery. I passed it, planning to finish off the trip there later. I made a left down a dirt road to do some exploring and this is all I found. A gate with a friendly metal star accompanying a collection of "NO TRESPASSING" signs and padlocks. That oak tree looks older than the town itself.


The fence along the road.


Behind the fence is what I assume is the former Burkett School. The school district consolidated with Coleman and Cross Plains in 1957. I don't know how long they continued to maintain a school in this town, but it definitely doesn't have one now.


They're pretty serious about keeping people off the property. The whole town had an eerie "someone's watching you" vibe to it, so I didn't want to risk it this time.


Not screwing around here.


Heading back to the main road (The only paved road in town) with the Baptist Church behind the scrub.


Looking back down the school's road.


One of a dozen or two homes in Burkett. Generally, it was impossible to tell whether or not most were still inhabited. I was honestly afraid to leave my car anywhere. I feel more safe in a completely abandoned town than in one that still feels fresh.


One of the few stores in town, obviously abandoned. Sorry for the glare - the sun was setting by the time I got to town.


The Burkett Post Office, which still receives a handful of mail a week.


An old shotgun house that had seen better days.


I crossed this bridge, which spans the Pecan Bayou, in my car first to test it out. I parked on the far side and took a stroll across. There is not nearly enough room for two car to safely pass.


The couple trucks that passed me as I walked set the whole thing shaking.


This was the eeriest part of the town. It felt like I was right back in a scene from "Stand By Me."


Most of the bridge simply spans the bayou's valley and not the water itself.


Looking down at the leafy ground below. My friend and I debated whether we'd run on or below the bridge if we got chased by mutant locals (think "The Hills Have Eyes.")


Many sections had long ago been smashed out, presumably by wrecks.


No one but Chuck Norris could have done this.


Walking under a Pecan canopy as we approach the truss section of the bridge.


Everything was rusted, fading carvings of names and school spirit slogans barely showing here and there.


The rust really was doing a number.


Looking toward the newer Route 206 bridge just up the creek.


Looking toward town.


The Texas Department of Transportation long ago abandoned this style of sign, yet here it is.


The only living thing we saw outside of a car.


Maybe this used to be a park?


This is blurry, and also my last photo from in town, as around this time, we took a turn down a dirt road trying to find the business strip. It turned into a dead end in the middle of a huddle of ramshackle houses. A rottweiler ran around in circles near us and a small blond boy stared at us as he threw a ball up in the air. I wasn't in the mood to be turned into a lampshade, so we left and headed for the cemetery.


Only in a ghost town is the cemetery almost always the most comforting place around. The only place I felt somewhat safe.


Just inside the main entrance. It's immediately obvious that more people are buried in Burkett than living in Burkett.


Seashells being a common theme on older children's graves, it made me wonder where the shells came from in 19th century west Texas.


This cement vault was about shoulder height with no entrance.


Note the lack of death date. We surmised that they must be chilling inside the vault watching TV.


The tomb next to it didn't fare as well.


A casualty of "The World War."


A lamb - a sign that the deceased is a child.


It makes me wonder why they'd go to such trouble to remove a fence.


Maybe it's just me, but I thought that the engraved foot stones weren't supposed to be haphazardly flung on top of the grave...


Many shells had been worn through by a century of weather and wear.


Occasionally, the grave would be marked with a homemade stone. "IN GOD WE TRUST" with an endearing backward N.


Looking out over the sea of stones.


A family plot with wildly varying styles and qualities of stones.


The misspelled "Sleep" on the bottom as "Seep." It's amazing that in 111 years, no one would try to fix that.


Another odd one: What year did he actually die?


Someone took the time to pull the headstone and divider out of the ground, only to drop them just about where they were before. Why?




It's not often that you see veterans of the Spanish American War.


This made me laugh. It matched no one's name & was just plopped in the grass near a headstone. I imagine it being pronounced like "SCHWING!" But then again, I'm a terrible person.


An elaborate and obviously expensive new headstone.


I always appreciate the ones with photos. It makes it seem so much more real to put a face with the name.


Apparently awaiting a headstone, this semi-new grave is littered with personal trinkets, including an unopened Dr Pepper.


The sun began to set and the temperature dropped quickly.


Good bye, Burkett.
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Old 12-08-2009, 04:16 AM
 
54 posts, read 186,565 times
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Great pictures! Burkett kinda scares me though... especially the misspellings on the stones. O.o
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Old 12-08-2009, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Universal City, Texas
3,109 posts, read 9,798,475 times
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Great pics near Abilene. Have you been to Fort Phantom Hill, north of Abilene? Back in the early 70's I visited most of the old forts and I found Fort Phantom Hill to be my favorite. I liked the chimneys standing alone.
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Plano, TX
714 posts, read 2,918,526 times
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Its been a couple years since I've travelled thru Burkett on Hwy 206, never went thru the "downtown area." Is that little store still open on 206?
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Florida
418 posts, read 1,085,734 times
Reputation: 318
Very nice and interesting, thanks for sharing.
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