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Old 08-28-2009, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Metromess
11,798 posts, read 20,270,305 times
Reputation: 4962

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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgste View Post
the only flat land is the panhandle area, not west Texas. And Del Rio is not west texas. It is central Texas.
The South Plains/Caprock area of West Texas, from just west of Post westward, is exceedingly flat. It has an almost imperceptible rise in elevation from east to west to the NM border, but it's got virtually no local relief.

Del Rio isn't in central Texas, but Cathy4017 has already covered that. I just want to second her opinion.
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Old 08-29-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 9,501,462 times
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Most of West Texas isn't desert, unless you are limiting your def. of W. TX to the Permian Basin and lower elevation parts of the Trans-Pecos. The Caprock Escarpment is the area climbing up to the South Plains (Lubbock area) from an easterly/southeasterly direction and isn't flat at all! It is, however, very remote and under-populated, with no cities or even towns of any great significance (think Post, at the top of the Caprock Escarpment, southeast of Lubbock). Much of West Texas is, in fact, prairie that has been stripped of its natural grasses and placed under intensive cultivation of crops such as cotton and soybeans -- unless you are omitting the Panhandle from the definition of West Texas. Some parts of the area have also been over-grazed, such as around San Angelo. The eco-system is extremely sensitive and has often responded poorly to ranching and crop agriculture.
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Old 08-29-2009, 11:47 AM
ncc
 
95 posts, read 252,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitegiant View Post
I am just wondering how come all of these people moving to texas and just plain texans in general no one seems to be moving to West Texas. Everyone just wants to go to the overgrown towns that are always congested and getting more and more expensive to live in . West texas has many larger towns but no one wants to move to them. Lubbock Amarillo El Paso Odessa Midland. Yes they are growing but they are not growning like the rest of texas. We have a great climate and the larger cities have good jobs. So im just wondering what the reason is behind people kinda avoiding West texas.
Because liberals don't view West Texas as "sophisticated". This is good news for good ole American folks that live there because the radical commies won't be movin in with their SOCIAL AGENDAS, so taxes will be low..
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Old 08-29-2009, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 9,501,462 times
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That's silly, ncc. Austin is the most liberal city in Texas, but has many of the same problems attracting industrial-business development as cities like Lubbock or Amarillo. The problem is that these cities are in a completely different class than Dallas or Houston. They lack an international airport, are off the beaten path in terms of ground transport and geographical location generally, lack the existing infrastructure of larger cities, and in contrast to Houston aren't seaports. Nothing succeeds like success -- cities that are already established major centres of commerce are going to continue to grow exponentially unless the whole regional economy falls apart (as happened in the "rust belt"). Frankly, I don't know why anyone would wish Lubbock, San Angelo or Amarillo to become carbon copies of DFW, Houston, LA, etc.
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Old 08-29-2009, 01:17 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,287 posts, read 10,139,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
Most of West Texas isn't desert, unless you are limiting your def. of W. TX to the Permian Basin and lower elevation parts of the Trans-Pecos. The Caprock Escarpment is the area climbing up to the South Plains (Lubbock area) from an easterly/southeasterly direction and isn't flat at all! It is, however, very remote and under-populated, with no cities or even towns of any great significance (think Post, at the top of the Caprock Escarpment, southeast of Lubbock). Much of West Texas is, in fact, prairie that has been stripped of its natural grasses and placed under intensive cultivation of crops such as cotton and soybeans -- unless you are omitting the Panhandle from the definition of West Texas. Some parts of the area have also been over-grazed, such as around San Angelo. The eco-system is extremely sensitive and has often responded poorly to ranching and crop agriculture.
Well, maybe those areas are significant to US. I personally love Amarillo and Lubbock and all the little towns of the Panhandle, and just because they're not hustling and bustling with loads of people and all the problems that come with a bigger population, or that they're not nationally known as destinations, doesn't mean they are not significant to the area and the people who live there. Not every place can be a Dallas or Houston, and the people who choose to live in the flat lands with the tumbleweeds LIKE it that way. I love that I can drive ten minutes out of town and be on a FM or CR, park the truck, listen to the ciadas or watch a thunderstorm come in, that I can see the stars at night and actually hear nothing, instead of the constant drone of traffic on a busy street or an interstate. There is beauty in all places and all things.
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Old 08-29-2009, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 9,501,462 times
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cobolt, that WAS NOT a criticism -- just stating the facts in regard to the Caprock Escarpment speciifically. God, don't get your panties in a twist! I do know what I'm talking about, having finished HS in Lubbock and started uni at Texas Tech. Don't be so freaking defensive.
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Old 08-29-2009, 06:49 PM
 
Location: SD, VA, West Texas--staying awhile
353 posts, read 1,394,410 times
Reputation: 201
Default I wonder...

are they planning to connect the highway I-27 from Amarillo and Lubbock to I-20 at Big Spring? Imagine what that would do! My dh works in Big Spring and he says they are building several new hotels/motels there--right off the interstate--maybe in preparation of I-27 intersecting with I-20? Does anyone know?

Pam
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Old 08-30-2009, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Metromess
11,798 posts, read 20,270,305 times
Reputation: 4962
cobolt: I couldn't agree more. Much of the time I'd rather be out there than in Fort Worth. I like FtW, but the traffic and light pollution and etc. drive me crazy at times. I like Post a great deal; it seems like a soulful little town, and the Caprock Escarpment is splendid.
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Old 08-30-2009, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Beaverland, OR
588 posts, read 2,385,013 times
Reputation: 454
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
That's silly, ncc. Austin is the most liberal city in Texas, but has many of the same problems attracting industrial-business development as cities like Lubbock or Amarillo.
I agree that ncc's comment was rather stupid, but I object to the notion that Austin has the same problems attracting industry as Lubbock and Amarillo. Austin has done remarkably well in recent decades, and the population growth proves it. They've brought in and/or grown industry giants like Dell, Motorola (Freescale), Samsung, IBM, Whole Foods, Temple-Inland, Applied Materials, AMD, and National Instruments, among others. Lubbock, well they've recruited a fire sprinkler factory, a potato chip plant, and a cardboard box maker. Different leagues entirely.
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Old 08-30-2009, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 9,501,462 times
Reputation: 2561
Quote:
Originally Posted by catman View Post
I like Post a great deal; it seems like a soulful little town, and the Caprock Escarpment is splendid.

And I agree with this. I don't see how cobalt got any negative viewpoint from my post, based on what I objectively said. Actually, I cited Post because it is such a quaint little town that is set in such a pretty place at the top of the Escarpment. It's also the last of the ranching towns before you get into the farm towns of the South Plains to the north. Below Post, to the east, is a slow climb up through the Caprock Escarpment - one of the more interesting geographical areas in Texas and one that indeed feels very remote, almost wild, with huge ranches and tiny towns. Post is also a bit different and unique in that it has long had something of an art colony there. Post, of course, isn't really remote, given the proximity of Lubbock.
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