U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-26-2009, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Reno
2,029 posts, read 2,608,278 times
Reputation: 776
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjharris View Post
I went through the TEA for a one year certificate and it took me about 4 weeks. The nice thing about the certificate was that although I applied for it in April 09 the effective/expiration dates were 08/01/09 - 08/01/10 basically allowing me the full year to get a regular license. The Texes tests were pretty simple from the ones I've taken, and I've been out of school for over 20 years now. I got a ton of calls for interviews in late May and then again in late June. Even after I accepting a position I'm still getting calls. I guess it depends on the demand.

From what I was told though, a large majority of schools wont interview you until you at least have your one year license so maybe start the process in April like I did???
wow okay that is nice to hear that theywill start the effective date in august if applying in april (what i probably will do). it stinks how i wont be able to interview in late may!!! i wasnt planning to actually move to texas to july 1, but i will be able to technically leave where i am now in the middle of june, so if that increases my chance for the job, i will spend the extra money for rent.

thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-26-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Reno
2,029 posts, read 2,608,278 times
Reputation: 776
Quote:
Originally Posted by JS1 View Post
This is not true!

To be "highly qualified" you need a bachelor's degree and a passing score on the TExES test for your content area. That's all that "highly qualified" means.

Being "highly qualified" is one of the requirements to get a teaching certificate.

The teacher in the first year of teaching in the alt-cert process has a probationary certificate.
its weird. i have a special ed credential i got last year and i did not take the exam that makes me highly qualified in half the special ed jobs. special ed is designed differently though. for certain positions, you do not need to be highly qualified for (if you are the main teacher of instruction). however if you are the main teacher of instruction, you need to take specific exams.

there is some flexibility here at least with being highly qualified for special ed. i was able to get my credential, however on job interviews where i would be the main teacher of instruction, i would have up to a certain amount of time to pass the appropriate exam to make me highly qualified.

i know in texas if i am an rsp teacher supplementing the gen ed teacher, i do not need to be highly qualified. its the same in california with that. however, if i wanted a special day class, one of 2 things could happen in texas:
1. they might not allow me to teach a sdc until i pass the exam
or
2. they might grant me a year to pass the exam while i teach the sdc

i hope that what they do is grant me the 1 year certificate and allow me to go on all the special ed jobs. in any case, i prefer the rsp or full inclusion teaching jobs to being an sdc teacher.

texas did a good job at spelling out jobs available to non highly qualified special ed teachers:
What other activities may special education teachers carry out if they are not highly qualified in the core academic content area being taught?
There are many activities that special education teachers may carry out that would not, by themselves, require those teachers to be highly qualified in a particular subject matter. Special educators who do not directly instruct students in any core academic subjects or who provide only consultation to highly qualified teachers of core academic subjects in adapting curricula, using behavioral supports and interventions, or selecting appropriate accommodations do not need to demonstrate subject-matter competency in those subjects. These special educators could also assist students with study skills or organizational skills and reinforce instruction that the child has already received from a highly qualified teacher in that core academic subject. (See question 6 for examples of special education settings where the special education teacher is not required to meet highly qualified.)
from page 18 on http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/nclb/PDF/hq_guidance_stateversion_v5.032508.pdf (broken link)

i dont know if texas has "life skills" classes or what we call here cbi (community based intervention). they are great jobs! you work with older students who usually are retarded and most have down syndrome and spend much of the school day in the community teaching skills like going to the bank, using the bus, going to the supermarket, etc.

in any case, tomorrow morning i am asking the tea a bunch of questions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2009, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Reno
2,029 posts, read 2,608,278 times
Reputation: 776
Quote:
Originally Posted by love roses View Post
I am not yet certified and do not have a bachelors degree yet, working on it, but it'll be a ways down the road Anyway, for me to even be considered for certification, I had to first be hired by a school district so they could "sponsor" me. I applied for a substitute position and got it. It's not my highest aim at this point, but it got my foot in the door.
i am a sub now (by choice because i am a full time grad student and turned down some amazing special ed jobs), and it is GREAT for putting your foot in the door. even though i am not seeking a full time job for next year, i got teachers and principals asking me if i would be interested in a mid year hiring or a job for the following year as they know there would be openings. i really enjoy subbing and would probably continue it if i could afford to after my grad program is done!

you also get the inside scoop of the teachers, administrators, parents, etc. if you have the money to take a cut and sub, do it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2009, 10:15 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
867 posts, read 1,835,739 times
Reputation: 452
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeavingLA2010 View Post
i dont know if texas has "life skills" classes or what we call here cbi (community based intervention). they are great jobs! you work with older students who usually are retarded and most have down syndrome and spend much of the school day in the community teaching skills like going to the bank, using the bus, going to the supermarket, etc.
.
I don't know if all schools/districts offer them, but our school has a Life Skills classroom. I am at an elementary school and the Life Skills teacher has kids in the elementary school age range. The students usually attend "specials" such as P.E. and Music with a general ed. class with students around their age, but are with the Life Skills class for most of the day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2009, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Reno
2,029 posts, read 2,608,278 times
Reputation: 776
Quote:
Originally Posted by buffy888 View Post
I don't know if all schools/districts offer them, but our school has a Life Skills classroom. I am at an elementary school and the Life Skills teacher has kids in the elementary school age range. The students usually attend "specials" such as P.E. and Music with a general ed. class with students around their age, but are with the Life Skills class for most of the day.
yeah see i like stuff like that. would love to do it though at the middle and high school level, but i also would be perfectly happy in the elementary school setting (where most of my experience is anyway).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2009, 08:26 AM
 
443 posts, read 729,596 times
Reputation: 268
Once you figure out where you will relocate, start looking at the different districts within 30 miles of that area. Then, start contacting principals of those schools you are interested in, even if you aren't arriving until June. Make sure that you give them your credentials and the area you expect to teach. This will give them time to review you in advance. I know someone said something earlier about time frame for new hires, but I would start in March just before Spring Break. Of course, many principals will be preoccupied with taks testing but they will at least have plenty of notice and be more likely to consider you later. Special Ed Cert. is a high demand area. You will have a better chance of landing a position with that. Most 3A-5A schools have a life skills class and they are separate from inclusion class instructors. Seriously, SPED teachers are in high demand as more children are labled/classified/identified as LD, 504, SPED, AU, PD, etc.

Good Luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2009, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Reno
2,029 posts, read 2,608,278 times
Reputation: 776
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATX Homeboy View Post
Once you figure out where you will relocate, start looking at the different districts within 30 miles of that area. Then, start contacting principals of those schools you are interested in, even if you aren't arriving until June. Make sure that you give them your credentials and the area you expect to teach. This will give them time to review you in advance. I know someone said something earlier about time frame for new hires, but I would start in March just before Spring Break. Of course, many principals will be preoccupied with taks testing but they will at least have plenty of notice and be more likely to consider you later. Special Ed Cert. is a high demand area. You will have a better chance of landing a position with that. Most 3A-5A schools have a life skills class and they are separate from inclusion class instructors. Seriously, SPED teachers are in high demand as more children are labled/classified/identified as LD, 504, SPED, AU, PD, etc.

Good Luck.
thanks for the tips!
in your experience do the life skills teachers just teach life skills, or do are they the main instructor for something else (such as math)? i am really wanting to do full inclusion, life skills, or some community based intervention (possibly just considered life skills in texas), or rsp if i relocate in texas. buys me time to pass the exams to become highly qualified if i am the main teacher of academic instruction (but the truth is, i enjoy the jobs where you dont need to be highly qualified much more than the ones where you do).

yeah i saw that austin has so many districts within 30 miles of the area. i expect to do A TON of online applications! i am also going to do dallas just in case (prefer austin by a long shot though). my parents said i should just sublet halfway between the 2 in waco, but id rather drive farther and stay in austin if its a matter of interviews.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2009, 01:36 PM
 
443 posts, read 729,596 times
Reputation: 268
I'm not a SPED teacher, however, I have taught with many. Typically, the life skills teacher just teaches life skills. Resource teachers teach the different disciplines (Math, Reading, Writing, History, Science, Etc.) within SPED. Then, the inclusion teacher floats with SPED students from gen. ed. class to class. Hope that clarifies.

Probably best to decide on the place you want to live and then get your job. It really isn't that difficult. No need to commute more than 30 miles. Like I said before, SPED teachers are in high demand, mostly because of the high turn over. That said it is still not a shoe-in you'll get a job right away. So, you may have to work at something else until you get your cert. or a job in your field.

Again, good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Reno
2,029 posts, read 2,608,278 times
Reputation: 776
thanks. good to know there is security with getting a sped job. out here (california) people have been let go, and there are actually not that many sped opportunities. if there are, it is usually with working with emotional disturbed kids (i cannot handle that), or special day classes with such a mix of disabilities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top