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Old 07-27-2012, 09:18 PM
 
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So has TMC passed DT Dallas yet?...It's now 2012...this was supposed to have happened already....whats the hold up?
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Old 07-27-2012, 09:58 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasboi View Post
So has TMC passed DT Dallas yet?...It's now 2012...this was supposed to have happened already....whats the hold up?
.... economy?

lol
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Old 07-27-2012, 11:19 PM
 
Location: League City
2,324 posts, read 3,226,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasboi View Post
So has TMC passed DT Dallas yet?...It's now 2012...this was supposed to have happened already....whats the hold up?
Waiting for Dallas to catch their breath so they can run with the big boys. Kidding!
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by DanielWayne View Post
Waiting for Dallas to catch their breath so they can run with the big boys. Kidding!
Houston is in the same race..but right behind us.
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Old 07-28-2012, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Houston
458 posts, read 288,965 times
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If I had to guess, it would be that Dallas has a higher percentage of major projects that are funded by local money. Does anyone know if that's true? I'm talking about projects other than medical facilities in the TMC.

I think that the funding sources for projects in Houston tend to rely more on out-of-town sources that don't have associated home-town pride and are also more risk-averse. I suspect that is why Houston has been getting fewer flashy developments than Dallas for some time.

But, that's just an idea. Anyone care to offer another explanation?
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Old 07-29-2012, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,473 posts, read 992,808 times
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Wassnt that article in 09 ..so that would make it 13 or 14
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Old 06-06-2013, 07:49 AM
 
581 posts, read 380,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Truth713 View Post
Wassnt that article in 09 ..so that would make it 13 or 14
This article here explains what has happened:

Thousands of hospital beds empty even as area grows - Houston Chronicle

Quote:
Leaders of the city's largest private and public hospital systems say Houston has too many hospital beds.

Despite the rise in population, there's a drop in the number of people using hospital beds and the length of the time they spend in them, said Dan Wolterman, CEO of the nonprofit Memorial Hermann Healthcare System.

"You can't grow population fast enough to offset the declining use rate," he said. "We're going to have thousands of beds emptying out due to use rate falling. Every empty bed is a cost of health care in this community, and if it's empty, that's a wasted cost."

David Lopez, Wolterman's counterpart at the Harris County Hospital District, estimates the Houston region already has at least 10 percent more beds than it needs. Even fewer will be necessary, he said, as health care reforms are implemented and the focus shifts to prevention and primary care.

"Hospitals used to be considered revenue producers, but in the future hospitals will be considered high-cost centers," he said.

Correspondingly, he added, "Lengths of stay will also come down."

Across Houston, the annual use rate defined as the number of hospital admissions per 1,000 people - has dropped to 97 from 102 three years ago, Wolterman said.

For more than a decade, private hospital systems have been banking on growing populations in the suburbs, opening locations in Sugar Land, Katy, The Woodlands and the Clear Lake area.

Improved technology, however, is allowing more people to be treated outside hospitals, and insurers are tightening up on what kinds of patients are admitted and for how long, Wolterman said.

The Texas Hospital Association estimates there are 2.36 beds per 1,000 people in the Houston area, based on figures from 2009, the latest figures available. In 2002, there were 2.51 per 1,000 people. But the figures do not account for new construction since the beginning of 2010.

The publicly funded Harris County Hospital District has no plans to add beds and is focused on building outpatient clinics, ambulatory surgery centers and specialty clinics, Lopez said. The district has been forced to focus on lowering costs and hospital admissions anyway, he noted, because of the high number of uninsured patients its serves.

"We've already made the switch," he said. "When you have an uninsured population, it's better to keep them in a clinic setting."

A different take
Others are optimistic there's still demand in pockets of Houston.

Developer Monzer Hourani is finishing a hospital in Webster, development of which had stalled after a struggle to secure financing and St. Luke's pulled out of the project. He said he still hasn't completed financing but is raising money from a combination of investors and bank financing. Hourani has, however, secured a new operator for the hospital: Surgical Development Partners.

Called the Bay Area Regional Medical Center, the hospital will have 176 beds with room for expansion to 254, he said, adding that he expects construction to be finished in 18 months.

Aside from population growth, Hourani said, technology and health care reform are further driving demand for updated facilities.

"It has to be a very efficient hospital, not with lots of wasted space and old rooms and old services," he said. "They need a very modern infrastructure."

He's also eying Northwest Houston for another hospital project.

The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center has no plans to build additional buildings or beds in the suburbs. However, its president, Dr. John Mendelsohn, said he expects growing admission rates and new cancer treatment options to help fill an additional eight floors being added to Alkek Hospital in the Texas Medical Center.

Three of the floors are already being used, adding about 60 beds to the hospital, and the build-out should be completed over the next five years, Mendelsohn said. The remaining floors could include more beds, a home for new technologies, patient care or some combination.

"I believe we're going to need those beds," he said, adding that M.D. Anderson has regional centers where patients can receive chemotherapy and radiation therapy and is considering partnerships that would allow its doctors to do surgeries at hospitals near those centers.

A cautious approach
Eric Johnson, managing director of health care advisory services at Houston-based Transwestern, is cautious about growth. In general, he said, Houston has an excess of hospital beds, including in Sugar Land and the Texas Medical Center, since the recession immediately followed a period of high growth.

The Medical Center alone has about 6,800 beds. Other areas, however, such as Kingwood, Clear Lake and the U.S. 290 corridor, are more in line with demand, Johnson said.

Whatever the demand, uncertainty surrounding health care reform is making it harder for developers to raise capital to fund new hospital projects, he said.

"I think we'll go through a period where there's less growth," he said, "but hospitals will spend money on getting more efficient, improving technology and cutting costs."
With Obamacare, we live in a new age. The less hospital beds, at least for now, the better.
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Old 06-06-2013, 08:06 AM
 
581 posts, read 380,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
.... economy?

lol
Downtown Dallas has been shrinking as an office market ever since the late 80's. Lots of older buildings have been and still are being converted over into residential. There have been a few small buildings built in downtown in the Arts District for sure. Figure if the Texas Medical Center remains the same, downtown Dallas will one day shrink to a size smaller than it. But we are talking the number of employees working, right? I guess the Texas Medical Center needs to remind the world on occasion that it is still a big place.
What makes Dallas different is how major corporations are now based in Uptown, downtown, within CityPlace next to the West Village area, and now along Maple Avenue. Figure corporations will also one day be based in the Dallas Design District.
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:19 PM
 
3,236 posts, read 2,493,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by binkyman View Post
Downtown Dallas has been shrinking as an office market ever since the late 80's. Lots of older buildings have been and still are being converted over into residential. There have been a few small buildings built in downtown in the Arts District for sure. Figure if the Texas Medical Center remains the same, downtown Dallas will one day shrink to a size smaller than it. But we are talking the number of employees working, right? I guess the Texas Medical Center needs to remind the world on occasion that it is still a big place.
What makes Dallas different is how major corporations are now based in Uptown, downtown, within CityPlace next to the West Village area, and now along Maple Avenue. Figure corporations will also one day be based in the Dallas Design District.
This is very true...The bounderies for DTD have been expanded. Therefore corporations view all of the expanded areas as a part of one downtown market.
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:33 PM
 
2,652 posts, read 2,348,697 times
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Originally Posted by dallasboi View Post
This is very true...The bounderies for DTD have been expanded. Therefore corporations view all of the expanded areas as a part of one downtown market.
Not according to the office reports. The boundaries are still pretty distinct and the offices in Uptown are still considered suburban office space. Since the boundary expansion is still kind of recent, it's going to take a few more years before its widely all accepted as part of the downtown market, but it will get there.
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