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Old 05-06-2010, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Dallas
101 posts, read 109,354 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarface713 View Post
Was this picture taken in downtown? That is amazing.

 
Old 05-06-2010, 09:52 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,903 posts, read 8,188,843 times
Reputation: 3173
Yeah, that's Downtown.
 
Old 05-06-2010, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
3,269 posts, read 5,211,559 times
Reputation: 623
Texas skyscraper diagram

Texas Skyscraper Diagram - SkyscraperPage.com
 
Old 05-19-2010, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Miami
21 posts, read 37,694 times
Reputation: 20
I'm from Dallas (with a large family presence in both the North and Southeast Texas metro areas). Both skylines are impressive- in their own ways. Semantics aside, it becomes all about the angle from which each skyline is being viewed- along with your respective distance from the skyline's location.

Driving down I-45 going past the 610 exchange looking at Houston's immediate downtown skyline has rarely- if ever impressed me. Driving down 75 expressway toward Dallas' skyline rarely ceases to impress me, night or day. However, looking south toward Houston's skyline while driving west/south on the Beltway 8 approaching the Katy Fwy is VERY impressive to see. Also, there is a view from the Bush Airport area (looking toward the south-by-southwest horizon) that allows you to see a stretch encompassing the downtown skyline and the Galleria skyline that is almost mind-boggling in the daytime. Dallas ALMOST accomplishes a similarly breath-taking view when driving west-bound on I-20 (past I-635 while approaching I-45, night or day), and, when going southbound on I-35 (passing Inwood/Mockingbird Ln) which is cool during the day but ridiculously stunning at night. (This view encompasses ALL of the new uptown high-rises while leading directly into the downtown skyline. This view can EASILY catch ANYONE off-guard.) To me, there is NO view of any aspect of Houston's skylines that matches this particular visual. Also, no one ever seems to mention the view of Dallas' skyline when driving northbound on I-45 (-on the eastern downtown expressway interchange- er, "mixmaster" connecting I-45 to I-30, I-35, and 75). This view shows the downtown skyline as it approaches the uptown skyline. The problem with this view is that it's hard to take it all in if you're driving- because, to do so is inherently dangerous due to it's up-close-and-personal proximity to the buildings via the sheer breadth and winding curvature of the route. Houston simply doesn't offer this type of visual at a similar vantage point. But, Houston, unlike, Dallas, architecturally developed the hell out of it's inner-Loop area. Dallas falls short in this arena.

However, I live in the Miami area now, and, neither Houston or Dallas can currently compete with the skyline in this bad-boy (-although, Houston could if it filled in a couple of gaps).

Scale-for-Scale: Houston wins this one merely on the strength of "way more" and "slightly taller". But those are merely semantics.

Last edited by Hanglo Phucwell; 05-19-2010 at 10:05 PM..
 
Old 05-19-2010, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,302 posts, read 12,965,538 times
Reputation: 4752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanglo Phucwell View Post
Scale-for-Scale: Houston wins this one merely on the strength of "way more" and "slightly taller". But those are merely semantics.
Slightly taller? Houston is MUCH taller than Dallas.
 
Old 05-20-2010, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Miami
21 posts, read 37,694 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Slightly taller? Houston is MUCH taller than Dallas.
Well, to me, when your eyes have been exposed to the sights of New York's, Chicago's, and even Philadelphia and Seattle's skylines, the apparent height advantage that Houston's skyline offers over Dallas' becomes substantially nullified. Remember, we're not just talking about sheer number and height when considering which of the 2 skylines are more impressive; we're also considering each skyline's visual aesthetic when viewed from multiple angles and distances. Also, keep in mind of how each of the cities' architectural design and layout interact with the eyes and psyches of any potential visitors, whom might not otherwise have an intimate familiarity with the sight(s) being viewed. Dallas strives to impress when driving from anywhere north of the skyline into the city (southbounds I-35, 75 and I-30 respectively). However, Dallas falls short when driving northbound toward the skyline (except from the vantage point of I-35 going north through Oak Cliff- in which case, Houston still maintains an arguable advantage).

On the other hand, Houston built tall buildings all throughout it's inner-core area (inner loop), and, depending on your vantage point (primarily, north facing south to southwest), the visual can easily bend your mind (-and Houston commands very much respect in this regard).

All-in-all, the "MUCH taller" aspect of Houston's skyline(s) starts to become less advantageous to it's overall competitive advantage over Dallas' skylines when considering the vantage points that they are being seen from (I've even heard a few Houstonians admit this freely). Houston's "height advantage" tends to become lost-in-visual-translation depending on how, and, from where it's being viewed. This is NOT to take anything away from Houston's more-than-impressive building layout scheme, but it is to say that Houston's skyline(s) don't automatically grab you instantaneously, whereas, I believe, most casual observers would suggest that Dallas' does.

However, I digress . When it comes down to which city (skyline affected and otherwise) has the most "Big-Scale" feel to it, Houston wins (-albeit, not necessarily by a landslide, but, significantly enough).
 
Old 05-20-2010, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Houston Inner Loop
655 posts, read 680,927 times
Reputation: 691
[quote=Hanglo Phucwell;14254357]I'm from Dallas (with a large family presence in both the North and Southeast Texas metro areas). Both skylines are impressive- in their own ways. quote]

One view in Houston that you didn't mention is the view on the 288 North ramp from the South Loop, which shows a good close up of the TMC, DTH and Galleria. And, I know it's just an opinion, but that view blows anything that Dallas offers out of the water. You really get a sense of how much more impressive the Houston skyline is. TMC alone looks to be larger than Uptown Dallas.
 
Old 05-20-2010, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Miami
21 posts, read 37,694 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by feufoma View Post

One view in Houston that you didn't mention is the view on the 288 North ramp from the South Loop, which shows a good close up of the TMC, DTH and Galleria. And, I know it's just an opinion, but that view blows anything that Dallas offers out of the water. You really get a sense of how much more impressive the Houston skyline is. TMC alone looks to be larger than Uptown Dallas.
On the route that you're mentioning (correct me if I'm mistaken, but I believe you're talking about when driving northbound?), then, YES- you're CORRECT; I agree. I believe I've only experienced that view only once (because I've hardly spent any time in that side of the Houston area when I'm there). Hence, my statement: However, Dallas falls short when driving northbound toward the skyline (except from the vantage point of I-35 going north through Oak Cliff- in which case, Houston still maintains an arguable advantage).

The only view in Dallas that strives to come close to this is this one: '...going southbound on I-35 (passing Inwood/Mockingbird Ln) which is cool during the day but ridiculously stunning at night. (This view encompasses ALL of the new uptown high-rises while leading directly into the downtown skyline. This view can EASILY catch ANYONE off-guard.)...' -Bare in mind that the view that you're speaking of allows for the Houston skylines to appear totally interconnected and stretched out; disadvantage: Dallas. If Dallas' downtown, uptown, and Irving's Los Colinas skylines could all be seen together from the correct angle (-which they can't), it would provide a very similar effect.
 
Old 05-20-2010, 09:50 AM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
8,903 posts, read 8,188,843 times
Reputation: 3173
No it wouldn't. Downtown Dallas, Uptown Dallas, and Las Colinas are significantly smaller than Downtown Houston, Uptown Houston, and the TMC combined. This photo has been posted many times before: http://farm1.static.flickr.com/101/2...13e06461_o.jpg
 
Old 05-20-2010, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Dallas
1,366 posts, read 1,476,733 times
Reputation: 775
And that shot still ain't that impressive, at least how y'all make it out to be.
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