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Old 12-05-2009, 11:59 PM
 
13 posts, read 93,435 times
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Please do tell.
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Old 12-06-2009, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Houston
52 posts, read 64,282 times
Reputation: 26
I live in Houston and it is a very green city. First time I came overhere I was expecting an arid city, kinda Las Vegas looking. How wrong was I. Texas starts to get arid in the very western part of the state. The biggest city in arid territory in the state of Texas is El Paso, which borders with the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez.
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Old 12-06-2009, 06:50 AM
 
Location: DENVER
1,437 posts, read 3,022,772 times
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Somewhere in west Texas it all depends in what road your on
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Old 12-06-2009, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
1,644 posts, read 2,853,044 times
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Big Bend National Park has a web site with photos taken by tourists at this location:

BIG BEND PHOTO ALBUM

The park is the best preserved natural area in West Texas and the photo album gives a good overview of what the desert region looks like from El Paso to about Del Rio on the USA side of the Rio Grande. The Pecos River is a good natural dividing line (IMO) between the Chihuahuan Desert region and the rest of Texas.

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Old 12-06-2009, 09:27 AM
Status: " On and off line interchangeably" (set 5 days ago)
 
9,823 posts, read 11,308,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellaFool View Post
Please do tell.
Here is a "map" that might help.

Hollywood "western movies" not withstanding (the "classics" were actually filmed in Arizona and southern California)...very little of Texas is actually truly desert and truly arid.

The Climate of Texas
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Old 12-06-2009, 10:52 AM
 
4,608 posts, read 5,085,680 times
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In a very general description, I'd draw a line from the eastern border of the panhandle due south to the Rio Grande. Texas begins to look desertish and arid from there. For a look into some of that region you can visit the Texas Travel Guide. There's a link for Cities and Regions which will give you a map of things and places in the regions.
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Old 12-06-2009, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Central Austin
2,416 posts, read 3,925,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WillysB View Post
In a very general description, I'd draw a line from the eastern border of the panhandle due south to the Rio Grande. Texas begins to look desertish and arid from there. For a look into some of that region you can visit the Texas Travel Guide. There's a link for Cities and Regions which will give you a map of things and places in the regions.
I don't see how the Panhandle could look like desert. It's prairie and farmland.
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Old 12-06-2009, 11:33 PM
Status: "Thinking of a master plan" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Houston-Galveston-Sugar Land MSA
1,444 posts, read 2,303,698 times
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Its green from the Louisiana border to Austin/ San Antonio Area. And from the SPI to Wichita Falls.
Once you get to less populated areas then yes desert like semi arid land formations take place. Most of Texas is Green and prairie lands.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:04 AM
 
Location: League City TX
1,726 posts, read 1,811,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
I don't see how the Panhandle could look like desert. It's prairie and farmland.
I think they are basically referring to the New Mexico border, particularly in the southern part of the state. West of the Pecos, per se.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Tejas
393 posts, read 816,376 times
Reputation: 256
the eagle pass area is pretty arid. in fact.. zapata up to eagle pass is kind of desertish.
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