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Unread 01-30-2010, 01:58 PM
 
7,670 posts, read 4,556,813 times
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Default Are there any aspects of Dallas/Fort Worth area that are similar to New England?

My husband and I are considering moving from Vermont to Waxahachie.

There are certain aspects of Vermont that I really like, for example the vibrant organic/farmers markets.

If I list a few of these points will you take the time to comment on them from a Texan point of view.

- Farmers Markets and organically grown meat and produce.

- Opportunities for growing your own vegetables and having chickens.

- Working in a tolerant environment if you are no religious.

- Lakes, trees, mountains

There are also some things I can't stand about Vermont like its inconsiderate drivers who tailgate.

So compare some of these;

- Horrible driving in general

- High taxes

- Expensive housing market

- Rude people from NY and Mass

Any ideas are welcomed. We have never been to Texas before.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:15 PM
 
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Are there any aspects of Dallas/Fort Worth area that are similar to New England?

No

This has been another in your series of simple answers to simple questions.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:42 PM
 
635 posts, read 1,223,313 times
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OK, sorry for the smart alec ressponse. I'll try to answer your questions

There are certain aspects of Vermont that I really like, for example the vibrant organic/farmers markets.

If I list a few of these points will you take the time to comment on them from a Texan point of view.

- Farmers Markets and organically grown meat and produce.


Waxahachie has a farmer's market during the spring, summer, and fall

- Opportunities for growing your own vegetables and having chickens.


Yes, although the heat will eliminate many of your favorite veggies and your growing seasons will be different.
- Working in a tolerant environment if you are not religious.
Not so much. This is the bible belt. People wear their religion on their sleeve to a much greater extent than you are used to in Vermont. You will be left alone. But here in Texas a whole lot of people's social lives revolves around their church.

- Lakes, trees, mountains
Lots of lakes and some trees. Closest mountains are 500 miles away in New Mexico.

There are also some things I can't stand about Vermont like its inconsiderate drivers who tailgate.

So compare some of these;

- Horrible driving in general


And you think Texas drivers are better than in New England? HA HA HA HA HA HA HA..........HA


- High taxes


No state income tax but the sales tax is 8.25% and property taxes are a high or higher than any place in the US. Property values are much lower than in Vermont so it might even out.
- Expensive housing market


Yes....lots of cheap housing. Waxahachie has some nice areas but it is not an upscale area overall. There will be plenty of cheap housing and plenty of semi-rural housing where you can raise chickens.

- Rude people from NY and Mass


Not many of those. We breed our rude folks locally here in Texas.

Any ideas are welcomed. We have never been to Texas before.


Come visit in August before you make up your mind to leave New England
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
5,012 posts, read 6,843,840 times
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Are you a New Englander through and through?

If you are, then I can pretty much guarantee you won't like Texas.

It's a totally different world.

Yes, we have a farmer's market in Dallas. Is it anything like what you are thinking of from Vermont? No.

Lakes and tress? Yes, but again not what you are thinking of. Lakes are pretty much man-made down here. Mountains, not even close to what you are thinking of.

It's Texas, it's the Southwest, it's flat, open, hot and humid, nothing like New England at all. For instance, Vermont has about 650,000 people in the state. Just Dallas / Fort Worth alone (the closest major metroplex) has 6.5 million people.

There are many nice aspects to Texas, but it will be a completely different world for you.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 02:54 PM
 
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I'm from NZ and I've only been in the US for a year and a half. My husband is from Maine but he lived in Florida for 8 years so he's not really a diehard New Englander.
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Unread 01-30-2010, 09:15 PM
 
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Here's what used to be one of the nicer lakes in Texas. Possum Kingdon, just west of Fort Worth. You'll see trees, but not much Vermont. A 20,000-acre reservoir on the Brazos River in the Palo Pinto Mountains, known for its clear blue waters. It has a 310-mile (500 km) shore line. It is unusual for a Texas lake with average depths exceeding 80 ft and clear blue water vs. the usual muddy brown found in most Texas lakes.

Do make the visit, late August or so. At least then you'll know you made the right decision, whatever that might be.
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Unread 01-31-2010, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,752 posts, read 17,409,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by getmeoutofhere View Post
Are you a New Englander through and through?

If you are, then I can pretty much guarantee you won't like Texas.

It's a totally different world.

Yes, we have a farmer's market in Dallas. Is it anything like what you are thinking of from Vermont? No.

Lakes and tress? Yes, but again not what you are thinking of. Lakes are pretty much man-made down here. Mountains, not even close to what you are thinking of.

It's Texas, it's the Southwest, it's flat, open, hot and humid, nothing like New England at all. For instance, Vermont has about 650,000 people in the state. Just Dallas / Fort Worth alone (the closest major metroplex) has 6.5 million people.

There are many nice aspects to Texas, but it will be a completely different world for you.
Exaggerate much???? East Texas is very lush and bigger than the whole state of Vermont. The state of Texas is flat??? Have you ever heard of Hill Country or the mountains in West Texas???
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Unread 01-31-2010, 12:45 AM
 
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I was born in New Hampshire and lived in Massachusetts when I was a child. Although I spent much more time in New Jersey as I grew up, I still consider myself a New Englander.

I have lived in Texas since 1995, and Dallas since 1996, and to answer your question, NO, it is nothing like New England. I don't know if I will ever get used to the heat and the storms here, for a start; give me a blizzard and I'm in my element. And I have to agree with the other posters who recommended visiting in August. Had I done so myself, I wouldn't have agreed to the move, believe me.

I am not religious and our family is probably the only one I know of not active in their church or in a couple of cases, their temple. I have never seen so many churches in my life, although I will say that it's not forced on us; we just don't talk about it to avoid any issues, basically.

Yes, there are trees and lakes,but nothing that will remind you of home. I spent a ton of time near Lake Quannapowitt in Wakefield, MA, for example, and have yet to be reminded of it in any way. I miss the change of seasons in a big way, too.

There are bad drivers here too. They are just more polite about it. :P

There are farmers markets to be found, but again, not like what you are used to.

I think the thing I probably miss the most about where I live in particular is the lack of a 'town'. Wakefield in MA and Westfield in NJ both had true downtown areas and there is nothing like that in my city. Yes, there are some small downtown areas in some places, but you know what I mean. Like Woodstock or Brattleboro. *wipes away a tear* Now I've gotten myself all nostalgic!

I hope at least some of this helps you. And I wish you the best of luck in whatever you decide!!
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Unread 01-31-2010, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
5,012 posts, read 6,843,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Exaggerate much???? East Texas is very lush and bigger than the whole state of Vermont. The state of Texas is flat??? Have you ever heard of Hill Country or the mountains in West Texas???

It's nothing like up there.

Compared to New England, Texas is a flat, barren desert.
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Unread 01-31-2010, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
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Flat, barren desert is a bit of an exaggeration. But, I'll agree, I don't think Tx will be much like New England. The culture is entirely different from what I hear. My Brother in law is from upstate New York, and he likes Texas so not every transplant from up North has a hard time adjusting. Texas is a very large state and the topography varies from Region to Region. I've only been to one farmer's market up North and that was in Brooklyn. It was a nice one, but not different than some you can find down here. There are tons of farmers markets around and Austin has a good one. I'm sure in every big city in Tx, and nearby surrounding towns you'll find some that are pretty good.

The growing season in Tx is long. I think there are only 2 months where it will be tough due to frost issues. You actually can grow almost anything here. This past year one of the Peach Orchards in Fredericksburg started successfully growing olives and will soon start pressing olive oil. Depending on where you buy and if there are any H.O.A rules, yes, you can have chickens. Houston, Austin, possibly San Antonio there are areas where it's fine to do so inside city limits; Of course, if you live a bit more rural almost anything goes.

There are lots of religious people around, but I'm still scratching my head over how so many people are moving here saying the first question they get asked is "What church do you go to?" I've lived in Texas nearly my entire life and have never asked anyone that (unless we were talking about church for some reason), nor have I asked anyone that. What you will probably notice is that people still stand for the pledge of allegience and hold their hands over their hearts. They will also say "God" when reciting it, even in school, although you have the option to not say it and noone will form a lynch mob to come after you if you don't. Texas has a surprisingly large variety of different religions (or non-religions) as the case may be.

Lakes and trees, yes...Mountains, no (not Dallas/Ft. Worth) unless you were in West Texas (El Paso, Marfa, Ft. Stockton, etc...). You can find some rolling terrain East of Dallas around Tyler area. Someone here posted pictures so you could do a search.

I don't think bad drivers are avoidable really (especially on the freeways). There are more people here who will let you into traffic if you are trying to leave a shopping center or something (Texas in general) and on some smaller roads or 2 lane roads, if there is ample shoulder, they will pull to the side and let you pass...but, if they do, it's polite to acknowledge the person with a wave.

We tend to have high property taxes, but no state income tax so like another poster said above, it sort of evens out. Cost of living will be lower.

Housing market will be lower, although I'm sure depending on the area you choose, stock can be priced pretty high. Dallas will have more reasonable options. Austin is the most expensive city in Texas. As low as 180k can buy you a cookie cutter house with 5 bedrooms and extra family room. 200k and up can buy you something a lot bigger or higher quality.

People are nicer all over Texas. Yes, you can find rude people but generally people you've never met will start talking to you. People in line at the grocery store, the checkers, you're waitstaff at a restaurant/and sometimes even the owners; and not because they think you're rich or something. They will just walk around talking to everyone. You will sometimes find men who still tip their hat to a lady, hold doors open...and people who will step in to help if it looks like you need it. I could go on and on with examples, but people are pretty friendly.

People are posting that you should visit in July and/or August because those are the 2 most miserable, hot months in Texas. Heat and humidity will be at their highest and if you come during those months you'll have a better idea of what to expect. Lots of people come late fall/early spring and hit some of our better, milder weather and then don't know what to do with themselves in July and August. You'll be better prepared if you do.
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