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Old 04-18-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,344 posts, read 28,629,718 times
Reputation: 20790

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Ok. So. More than 40 people purportedly died in the North Carolina/Virginia outbreak the other day.

Please somebody explain something to me.

How does this happen when it's daylight?

Where I live in the beautiful Missouri Ozarks, I am frequently up until two or three in the morning keeping my eyes glued to the weather radar from local NOAA station in Springfield, MO. Making my plans to scurry to the underground shelter, three cats and important papers in tow.

Eventually, around about 4 am, I am so exhausted that I give up. I simply give up. My attitude at that point is...."if I die, I die". Usually, however, the threat has passed by that time and I can drop into bed. Knowing that the next day is going to be murder to get through.

So explain to me how, when it is DAYLIGHT outside, and you can flip on any radio or television station and see exactly what is happening. How do people get caught in houses, etc., and killed in tornadoes?

Now, of course, I realize that not EVERYBODY has storm shelters. However, surely, people would have a plan to go someplace for safety if their life would be in danger. If their FAMILY was in danger.

How does it happen, that, in the middle of the day, 40-some-odd people can be killed in a tornado? I don't get this.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 04-18-2011, 12:45 PM
 
18 posts, read 27,510 times
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Not everybody keeps up with the weather, kinda like politics, and not everyone has a safe place to go to, especially if they find out at the last minute.
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Old 04-18-2011, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 4,889,646 times
Reputation: 6112
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Ok. So. More than 40 people purportedly died in the North Carolina/Virginia outbreak the other day.

Please somebody explain something to me.

How does this happen when it's daylight?

Where I live in the beautiful Missouri Ozarks, I am frequently up until two or three in the morning keeping my eyes glued to the weather radar from local NOAA station in Springfield, MO. Making my plans to scurry to the underground shelter, three cats and important papers in tow.

Eventually, around about 4 am, I am so exhausted that I give up. I simply give up. My attitude at that point is...."if I die, I die". Usually, however, the threat has passed by that time and I can drop into bed. Knowing that the next day is going to be murder to get through.

So explain to me how, when it is DAYLIGHT outside, and you can flip on any radio or television station and see exactly what is happening. How do people get caught in houses, etc., and killed in tornadoes?

Now, of course, I realize that not EVERYBODY has storm shelters. However, surely, people would have a plan to go someplace for safety if their life would be in danger. If their FAMILY was in danger.

How does it happen, that, in the middle of the day, 40-some-odd people can be killed in a tornado? I don't get this.

20yrsinBranson
I think your on the right track , this area was at sea level according to news reports. No one had basements. I live in the Midwest and we are a little more in tune with how dangerous a tornado can be at times and fully prepared for natures fury. I do not know how large or what scale this tornado was but that area is really not used to large violant tornados they are used to little tornados that cause little if any destruction. This storm appears to be one in a hundred year type set up. The people just were not aware of how dangerous a tornado can be. I see your from Missouri so you see things entirely different than someone who is in an area that gets little tornado activity. hope this helps you out
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Old 04-18-2011, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Eastern NC
17,457 posts, read 16,052,204 times
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No basements, no storm shelters, no sirens, and very little experience when it comes to tornados. Thats how deaths happen in the middle of the day.
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,198 posts, read 11,172,968 times
Reputation: 2573
When a tornado hits a home dead on, so often there's no hope. What puzzles me is why people who live in tornado states don't have storm cellars. I must admit I didn't for many years even though I said I'd never live in Texas without one, but I finally came to my senses and had one put in. Some people make so light of bad storms that I just don't understand their mentality. I'm like you, 20yearsinBranson. I stay tuned all night long, don't sleep, and the next day is torture while at work. I think some people are just plain stupid. If people in these states don't see the danger of bad storms and think the aftermath of a tornado viewed on the nightly news is fiction, I guess what happens happens. I absolute hate this time of the year even more than I hate months of end of a beastly hot and humid summer. I'm already ready for November. Now Texas is burning like crazy, 1.5 million acres so far, not much rain in sight, the wind won't stop, and I'm ready to scream.
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Old 04-18-2011, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
18,695 posts, read 34,847,066 times
Reputation: 2147483647
In some areas, due to shifting sands, a basement cannot be built. The shifting sands will buckle the walls in.

In some areas, the water table is too high (3 ft underground and you hit water) so if you put in a basement or storm cellar, it will erode and collaps.

I rode out a tornado in Texas, in broad daylight. I was watching it on the tv and where it was tracking. It looked like it was going to pass to the North of me. About 2 miles out, it knocked out power. Then I wasn't watching it on tv. So I went outside. At whatever distance it now was, (I couldn't see anything due to flying debree) it was so noisy you couldn't tell what direction it was going or which way it was coming. So after getting pelted by debree, I went back in my RV and hunkered down. I was in a thick stand of trees that were thick enough that it took an hour to back into that space. The tornado picked up my 5th wheel and moved it about 4 foot over in the front and 4 foot the other way in back, turning it a little sideways in the space. Didn't break anything. However, we had to put a winch on it to pull the front end over so I could get under it with my truck and straighten it out.

Not much I could have done. No basements within miles of me due to water table. Run? Run where, to the office that was not in the middle of trees and is the open?

They do make a waterproof shelter that you simply dig a hole and when they deliver they drop it in the whole and cover it up. They also make one like it that you actually plumb in for sewer and water in case you get covered under a building that flew over top of you and it takes a couple days to get out. These structures cost thousands of dollars. Not cheap.

However, if you put one of these structures in ground that has shifting sands, it will squeeze it out of the ground every couple of years. Cost effective?
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Old 04-19-2011, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,198 posts, read 11,172,968 times
Reputation: 2573
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkHunter View Post
In some areas, due to shifting sands, a basement cannot be built. The shifting sands will buckle the walls in.

In some areas, the water table is too high (3 ft underground and you hit water) so if you put in a basement or storm cellar, it will erode and collaps.

I rode out a tornado in Texas, in broad daylight. I was watching it on the tv and where it was tracking. It looked like it was going to pass to the North of me. About 2 miles out, it knocked out power. Then I wasn't watching it on tv. So I went outside. At whatever distance it now was, (I couldn't see anything due to flying debree) it was so noisy you couldn't tell what direction it was going or which way it was coming. So after getting pelted by debree, I went back in my RV and hunkered down. I was in a thick stand of trees that were thick enough that it took an hour to back into that space. The tornado picked up my 5th wheel and moved it about 4 foot over in the front and 4 foot the other way in back, turning it a little sideways in the space. Didn't break anything. However, we had to put a winch on it to pull the front end over so I could get under it with my truck and straighten it out.

Not much I could have done. No basements within miles of me due to water table. Run? Run where, to the office that was not in the middle of trees and is the open?

They do make a waterproof shelter that you simply dig a hole and when they deliver they drop it in the whole and cover it up. They also make one like it that you actually plumb in for sewer and water in case you get covered under a building that flew over top of you and it takes a couple days to get out. These structures cost thousands of dollars. Not cheap.

However, if you put one of these structures in ground that has shifting sands, it will squeeze it out of the ground every couple of years. Cost effective?
I hate the Spring in Texas. It's just too much. Of course, I hate the summer too. Anyway, my storm cellar is a one-pour cement, 10' x 10', and I wouldn't trade it for a Mercedes. It at least gives me some peace of mind during these months. Actually, I wouldn't have one that is "plopped" in the ground. I went with mine as I thought it was the best bet and it was only $4,000. This was in 1997. It has never flooded, gets very few bugs in it, and actually, is quite liveable. My neighbors like it too; I should charge admission.
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Old 04-19-2011, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
10,998 posts, read 2,097,214 times
Reputation: 16782
NC is my home state and while we are not an Oklahoma as far as tornados go, we do experience them. I too listen to the radio/tv or internet weather when a storm is brewing....we have had several tornado warnings this year already in my area which is inland in the center of the state.

Some of the damage was at sea level, other damage was as far in as Raleigh. Tornados here seem tend to land, then lift and move on to land again elsewhere, as opposed to one great one barreling along.....we also are still forested in the state, so even if daylight, no way to see what is coming......

Mobile homes are at such peril in these times. We would hope those that live in them would be extremely vigilant about the weather. A family that lost 3 children had last names that were Asian...could be they were recent immigrants.....with poor or no English language skills etc. and no way to get the warnings.
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Old 04-19-2011, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Eastern NC
17,457 posts, read 16,052,204 times
Reputation: 15355
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Ok. So. More than 40 people purportedly died in the North Carolina/Virginia outbreak the other day.

Please somebody explain something to me.

How does this happen when it's daylight?

Where I live in the beautiful Missouri Ozarks, I am frequently up until two or three in the morning keeping my eyes glued to the weather radar from local NOAA station in Springfield, MO. Making my plans to scurry to the underground shelter, three cats and important papers in tow.

Eventually, around about 4 am, I am so exhausted that I give up. I simply give up. My attitude at that point is...."if I die, I die". Usually, however, the threat has passed by that time and I can drop into bed. Knowing that the next day is going to be murder to get through.

So explain to me how, when it is DAYLIGHT outside, and you can flip on any radio or television station and see exactly what is happening. How do people get caught in houses, etc., and killed in tornadoes?

Now, of course, I realize that not EVERYBODY has storm shelters. However, surely, people would have a plan to go someplace for safety if their life would be in danger. If their FAMILY was in danger.

How does it happen, that, in the middle of the day, 40-some-odd people can be killed in a tornado? I don't get this.

20yrsinBranson
How do explain high death tolls in tornado prone areas?
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Old 04-19-2011, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
10,998 posts, read 2,097,214 times
Reputation: 16782
With you trlhiker.....

The manner in which the question was presented comes off like blaming those who were caught up in a natural disaster....but surely that was not the intention.






Quote:
Originally Posted by trlhiker View Post
How do explain high death tolls in tornado prone areas?
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