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Old 07-17-2009, 01:42 PM
 
103 posts, read 417,213 times
Reputation: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkgg7 View Post
You are assuming the "bohemian" stuff is a good thing and everyone likes it. I for one, don't. I don't like impoverished artists with long hair in weird outfit in my neighborhood at all.
I also prefer a city which is dead quiet at 11 PM. And I am a big fan of skycrapers, but not a fan of mountains.
Therefore, such arguement is kind of silly as people are different.
No i am not assuming. I do like it as a matter of fact. I can understand many others not liking it and they have the right to but it doesn't it should be ruled out of conversations.

And a bohemian lifestyle doesn't mean ''impoverished artists with long hair in weird outfit''. This can be one part of it but far from being all of it.

So if you are a fan of Skyscrapers you must like Toronto, i assume ?
Would you say Toronto has a bohemian feel or not at all ?
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Old 07-17-2009, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,722 posts, read 10,394,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by west_end_don View Post
A questions for Montrealers: Don't you get tired of losing to Toronto?

Except for a few business types, few people in Montreal really care about the city's status (or loss of) vis-à-vis Toronto.

Montrealers tend to be quite Quebec-focused and since Montreal is the uncontested metropolis of Quebec, that's good enough for them.

If they look beyond the borders of Quebec, they tend to cast their gaze continent-wide rather than keeping it restricted to Canada, and so it's usually New York they are looking at, or across the Atlantic to places like Paris.

Not saying that Montreal is necessarily in the same class as those cities, just that that's where the city's psyche lies.
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Old 07-17-2009, 02:23 PM
 
705 posts, read 639,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antoyne_42 View Post
No i am not assuming. I do like it as a matter of fact. I can understand many others not liking it and they have the right to but it doesn't it should be ruled out of conversations.

And a bohemian lifestyle doesn't mean ''impoverished artists with long hair in weird outfit''. This can be one part of it but far from being all of it.

So if you are a fan of Skyscrapers you must like Toronto, i assume ?
Would you say Toronto has a bohemian feel or not at all ?
What I am saying is simply whether a city is "Bohemian" or not doesn't define whether it is good or not, as according to some of the latest posts, many simply assume so as if "Bohemian = charming, non-bohemian = boring". I don't agree with that. Queen west is supposed to be bohemian, but it is definitely not one of my favorite spots. I prefer the St Lawrence market area much better, too bad it is so small. The whole "Bohemian thing" is just a personal preference, and I don't want it to be a defining characteristic of how charming a city is.

Toronto doesn't have a single supertall. I hardly categorize it as a skycraper city.
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Old 07-17-2009, 02:36 PM
 
365 posts, read 729,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Except for a few business types, few people in Montreal really care about the city's status (or loss of) vis-à-vis Toronto.

Montrealers tend to be quite Quebec-focused and since Montreal is the uncontested metropolis of Quebec, that's good enough for them.

If they look beyond the borders of Quebec, they tend to cast their gaze continent-wide rather than keeping it restricted to Canada, and so it's usually New York they are looking at, or across the Atlantic to places like Paris.

Not saying that Montreal is necessarily in the same class as those cities, just that that's where the city's psyche lies.
PPPHHHH!!!

Toronto doesn't care about what Montreal thinks - PLEASE!

I'd say the only city that Toronto wants to measure up to is New York.

Montreal? I never even heard about it until now!
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Old 07-17-2009, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,722 posts, read 10,394,867 times
Reputation: 3754
Quote:
Originally Posted by west_end_don View Post
PPPHHHH!!!

Toronto doesn't care about what Montreal thinks - PLEASE!

I'd say the only city that Toronto wants to measure up to is New York.

Montreal? I never even heard about it until now!
It's not exactly clear what you are saying here but I would also say that in general people in Toronto don't think about Montreal that much either. There may be some hockey-related issues with Montreal, but aside from that, as you said, Toronto looks to New York and pretty much New York only.

There isn't really anything resembling a bona fide rivalry (from the Toronto side anyway) between Toronto and any other Canadian city.

Interestingly enough, Montreal actually has a pretty active civic rivalry with Quebec City, in spite of the major size discrepancies between the two.
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:41 PM
 
5 posts, read 22,146 times
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Default Is Montreal better than Toronto

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I thought this comparison would be obvious, considering the similar sizes of each city. Never been to either, but Montreal seems more interesting because of the French culture thing. Thoughts, opinions?
Yes, I think Montreal is better in terms of going out and meeting people. People are more open and want to enjoy life more. Toronto is dead in this regard. I don't know why this is.
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:43 PM
 
5 posts, read 22,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's not exactly clear what you are saying here but I would also say that in general people in Toronto don't think about Montreal that much either. There may be some hockey-related issues with Montreal, but aside from that, as you said, Toronto looks to New York and pretty much New York only.

There isn't really anything resembling a bona fide rivalry (from the Toronto side anyway) between Toronto and any other Canadian city.

Interestingly enough, Montreal actually has a pretty active civic rivalry with Quebec City, in spite of the major size discrepancies between the two.
Montreal has more to offer in terms of people going out more and living life more.
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:47 PM
 
5 posts, read 22,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kkgg7 View Post
What I am saying is simply whether a city is "Bohemian" or not doesn't define whether it is good or not, as according to some of the latest posts, many simply assume so as if "Bohemian = charming, non-bohemian = boring". I don't agree with that. Queen west is supposed to be bohemian, but it is definitely not one of my favorite spots. I prefer the St Lawrence market area much better, too bad it is so small. The whole "Bohemian thing" is just a personal preference, and I don't want it to be a defining characteristic of how charming a city is.

Toronto doesn't have a single supertall. I hardly categorize it as a skycraper city.
Montreal is more bohemian. You see more culture there than in Toronto. Toronto has been striped of its culture. I remember going to Yorkville in Toronto in the 1960's and this was very bohemian. Toronto doesn't have this anymore anywhere in the city. You may see strips of the design in Dupont subway but it has been lost in the grapevine. It is too bad and sad that Toronto doesn't have much of a heritage anymore where Montreal you will the old culture more.
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:49 PM
 
5 posts, read 22,146 times
Reputation: 15
I think Montreal is more bohemian and cultural. They keep its history. Toronto is too modern and lost its appeal. Yorkvill use to be the place to go to in 1960's where everyone from musicians, college people, Pierre Elliot Trudeau and everyone would mingle. This is gone. It is so sad.
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Old 08-04-2010, 11:22 AM
 
13 posts, read 42,753 times
Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by anita paquet View Post
Montreal is more bohemian. You see more culture there than in Toronto. Toronto has been striped of its culture. I remember going to Yorkville in Toronto in the 1960's and this was very bohemian. Toronto doesn't have this anymore anywhere in the city. You may see strips of the design in Dupont subway but it has been lost in the grapevine. It is too bad and sad that Toronto doesn't have much of a heritage anymore where Montreal you will the old culture more.
You're simply ignorant. Yorkville evolved into a gentrified area but Toronto has everything to offer in the culture department. One encounters culture quite often in Toronto these days, be it bohemian or high culture. Take Kensington Market, which alone disproves your notion that there is no more bohemian culture in the city. Even during the G20 weekend, it was packed with people with musicians on the street. Then of course there's Queen West (Parkdale) and plenty of areas vibrant with artists and independent retailers. Ever here of the Toronto International Film Festival? It's one of the biggest in the world. Caribana?

The city's open acceptance of diversity only furthers culture in the city.

Toronto's heritage is all around the city and isn't going anywhere. From the iconic bay-and-gable Victorian neighbourhoods to striking old landmarks like University College, Old City Hall and the Distillery District, Toronto is evolving and making history now but is quite rich in culture. Some of the most renowned architects in the world have recently completed buildings here and more are planned. For Montreal, that era is gone. The fact is that today, Toronto is very vibrant metropolis which is naturally attracting a diverse arts scene which has eclipsed Montreal. Toronto is in places bohemian but it doesn't sum up the whole city. Why should it? The best cities are very diverse places. If a city can boast a leading financial district and a place like Kensington Market, then all the better.

We also gave the world Broken Social Scene. It's not just one the best indie bands but a collective with impressive side projects.
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