U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-08-2010, 10:56 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,664,791 times
Reputation: 13020

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Ask all those people if they are allowed to take those two weeks all at once, or if they have to break it up.
I don't know a single person who can't take it all at once. And I know a lot of people who regularly travel outside the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2010, 11:44 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,670,426 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I know very, very few people who don't get at least two weeks a year, which is plenty of time to travel. Those who dont' travel don't do so for lack of vacation time, but rather because they choose to spend their time and money on different priorities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Ask all those people if they are allowed to take those two weeks all at once, or if they have to break it up.
I am a higher ed administrator and I get three weeks, which is why I am planning something now. But in my last job I only got two weeks and I could not take it all at once because of how it accrued - just two days each month over the course of a year. Lots of jobs accrue time off this way.

Also, since many businesses are operating "lean" these days, long vacations are discouraged. And, jobs give you time off but they won't let you "leave the job at the job." For example, my brother is an electrical engineer and he's required to login and/or monitor his blackberry all the time. So much for going to a remote destination
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 12:12 PM
 
12,359 posts, read 18,454,883 times
Reputation: 19303
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Remember that many, probably most Germans, Brits, etc. travel abroad for the same purposes as most Americans do domestically - to laze on a beach with a drink in their hand, or enjoy some other relaxing experience without much contact with the native culture. If you have doubts about this, look at "Ballermann 6" in Spain, one of the British tourism outposts (the entire southeastern coast of Spain, Corfu, etc.), or Disney World. They simply can't have those experiences within their own countries. Lots of partying (for the younger crowd), relaxing, etc., nothing like the "refined" cultural experience most Americans who idolize Europe think all tourists from there embark on.

I will second (or third) that. It's amazing the places that europeans will go, that US see as an exotic and cultural destination, that they see as simply a cheap place to lay on a beach and get drunk for a week.
The islands of greece - popular with European college age set not because of it's beauty, history, and culture - but because it's a dirt cheap place to party.
Coastal souther Portugal and Spain, rich with history and the influences of the old colonial empires and the melting pot of the Moorish/Africans. Again - just another beach vacation for pasty white brits.
Bali, Indonesea - Amazing Hindu cultural island. Just filled with Australians who have no other desire but to party and drink all night and get sunburned on Kuta beaches by day. "The Cancun of Asia". Bali is an island the size of Connecticut. I don't think one australian venture out from the 4 quare mile central party headquarters in Kuta.
Egypt - do Europeans go to see the ancient history of the world wonders of the pyryamids and the temples of Luxor? Maybe as an aftertought, if they have time. Otherwise you can find them in the westernized sea-side toursit town of Sharm drinking Stella's and scuba diving in the Red Sea.

Last edited by Dd714; 07-08-2010 at 12:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 01:43 PM
 
8,266 posts, read 10,724,474 times
Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I know very, very few people who don't get at least two weeks a year, which is plenty of time to travel. Those who dont' travel don't do so for lack of vacation time, but rather because they choose to spend their time and money on different priorities.
A French/German/etc. person with five weeks obviously has an easier time traveling than someone with only two, that's the point being made here.

If the American with two weeks burns a few single days for long weekends and makes one short trip to see their parents or friends across the country suddenly finds they are down to one week. One week isn't a long time for the expense of flying to Europe or Asia.

A European with five weeks does same and still has four weeks of vacation left to take a nice long trip to another continent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Olympus Mons, Mars
5,721 posts, read 8,625,075 times
Reputation: 5822
2 weeks is just not enough to see much... heck if I go to SE asia I usually need 2-3 days just to get over the jet lag. Many of the interesting Lonely Planet itineraries are usually 3 weeks to a month long.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 02:33 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,664,791 times
Reputation: 13020
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
A French/German/etc. person with five weeks obviously has an easier time traveling than someone with only two, that's the point being made here.

If the American with two weeks burns a few single days for long weekends and makes one short trip to see their parents or friends across the country suddenly finds they are down to one week. One week isn't a long time for the expense of flying to Europe or Asia.

A European with five weeks does same and still has four weeks of vacation left to take a nice long trip to another continent.
If they've got the money to do so. Most Europeans have a higher cost of living and less discretionary income than their American counterparts.

And like I said, as far as time and money, it comes down to ones priorities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 06:45 PM
 
28,292 posts, read 39,967,233 times
Reputation: 36812
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I don't know a single person who can't take it all at once. And I know a lot of people who regularly travel outside the US.
Lucky people. I worked at the same company for 22 years, and had 4 weeks vacation. I was not allowed to take more than 5 days at one stretch...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 07:29 PM
 
8,266 posts, read 10,724,474 times
Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
And like I said, as far as time and money, it comes down to ones priorities.
And convenience, and time = money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Hoboken
19,891 posts, read 16,343,171 times
Reputation: 3123
I don't agree, most of the people in my area have been to abroad multiple times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2010, 02:39 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,991,119 times
Reputation: 1813
I was in Edinburgh yesterday visiting the castle. We joined a guided walk and aside from my Scottish dh, our Uganda friend, and one guy from England, the rest of this large group were Americans.

While walking around this huge and very crowded castle well more than half of the accents I heard were American. I won't say it's because they were louder as I heard plenty of loud Europeans and Asians.

When I lived in the US I was just a secretary at a state university. I accrued my time by the month, but would usually combine my time off with holidays. I had a month off a year and usually took vacations in 2 week time slots. No problem.

No one has pointed out that most foreigners currency goes farther in the US. For quite a few years the British pound was worth $2, so everything in the US was the equivalent of 1/2 off. I knew of many people in the UK who took short trips to NYC just to go shopping during that time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top