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Old 08-19-2011, 04:20 PM
 
472 posts, read 793,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles in PGI View Post
Schools, yes, there have to be one for Americans and one for British, due to the fierce competition to enter American colleges, and for the rigid requirements in British education system at certain levels (such as GCSE and A level.) Other countries, not so much. If American students and English students study the same thing as European students, they would not be able to return to their respective countries' education system with ease.
It's not americans in one school and british in the other, it's americans in one school and almost every other nationality in the other.

and they don't study the british (i think you mean english, btw) curriculum in any case.
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Old 08-19-2011, 05:08 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
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Originally Posted by CHwboy View Post
It's not americans in one school and british in the other, it's americans in one school and almost every other nationality in the other.

and they don't study the british (i think you mean english, btw) curriculum in any case.
I do know that American students from abroad usually have tougher time getting in prestige American colleges than students in the States who took AP classes in their last two years and prepare for SAT for at least as long. That's why I understand perfectly the need for American schools abroad if the students intend to go back to the States for college.

I also know that English (or British, since even though education systems in Northern England and Scotland are separated from the one in England, there is not a huge difference in all three systems. I don't know anything about Wales, so I can't comment) students who live abroad, for their last years in school, have to find a curriculum that adhere to the requirements in their own countries. That's why young English children can attend any school abroad, but once they reach 15 or so, most parents would move them to a school with an approved curriculum.

Tuition for English schools is a major expense in the budget of English parents who live abroad. The ones who decide against putting their children in English schools are planning that their children will not seek higher education in their home country.

Last edited by Ol' Wanderer; 08-19-2011 at 05:31 PM..
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Old 08-19-2011, 07:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles in PGI View Post
I do know that American students from abroad usually have tougher time getting in prestige American colleges than students in the States who took AP classes in their last two years and prepare for SAT for at least as long. That's why I understand perfectly the need for American schools abroad if the students intend to go back to the States for college.

I also know that English (or British, since even though education systems in Northern England and Scotland are separated from the one in England, there is not a huge difference in all three systems. I don't know anything about Wales, so I can't comment) students who live abroad, for their last years in school, have to find a curriculum that adhere to the requirements in their own countries. That's why young English children can attend any school abroad, but once they reach 15 or so, most parents would move them to a school with an approved curriculum.

Tuition for English schools is a major expense in the budget of English parents who live abroad. The ones who decide against putting their children in English schools are planning that their children will not seek higher education in their home country.
A few comments on your post.

A great many Brits who work overseas have tuition expense paid by their company or organization. This is particularly the case if they are transferred overseas or if they work for an international organization.

The options are usually an international school in the country where they are located or sending the child to boarding school in the UK. International schools are not specific to the English/British system and may only offer the International Baccalaureat rather than GCSEs and A levels.

I lived in Switzerland (Geneva) when my children were younger. The reality there was that the Swiss state schools were better quality than the international schools and were free. There was not a separate American school. So, what we did was to send our kids to Swiss school and then move them into the UK system when they were 15. The Swiss education was good enough for them to get through the English exams with no problem. What we had to do was to work on their written English skills and reading comprehension in the interim.

Both my kids went to the University of Glasgow which is one of the better British universities, got good degrees and now have good jobs (one in Switzerland and the other here in the USA).
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Old 08-19-2011, 07:30 PM
 
14,253 posts, read 15,327,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles in PGI View Post
Actually, the first one who said the English only like to party on these threads is an English man who lives in England, English Dave, whose post is immediately above yours. We (Americans) who had seen the same thing happened uncountable times, just followed suit and agreed with him.

And no, it's not stereotype if it's the truth. Not every English likes to party, but a great majority of young and not-so-young English travelers see travel as a means to party, and almost all mature English travelers also travel abroad only to have the same kind of party in the same kind of English clubs/pubs/resorts as they have at home, with other English people.

Most English expats also live among other English expats while American expats don't. American expats get together occasionally, but they don't live within a small radius with other American expats.
In Geneva the Americans had their own club, Womens club, church and library. The Brits just has a church.
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Old 08-19-2011, 07:33 PM
 
14,253 posts, read 15,327,070 times
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Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
There are English people who are adventurous of course. Generally young people who
go back packing to out of the way places. But the majority like what they get at home.
There is a resort called Benidorm on the Costa Blanca in Spain. Right now it is awash in
English people eating food that the eateries boast on signs outside Sunday dinner - Roast
beef, roast potatoes, veg and real English gravy!! A lot of the bars are set out like pubs in
England. Most of the people who go there just want something like England with sun and
cheap booze. In winter it's full of elderly English who go there for months sometimes playing
bingo.
You think Benidorm is bad Check out Marmaris in Turkey. Its like Blackpool with sun
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Old 08-19-2011, 08:26 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
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Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
In Geneva the Americans had their own club, Womens club, church and library. The Brits just has a church.
In many parts of Spain, there is not a thing for Americans to join, but dozens of clubs, pubs, and areas where everyone drinks G&T, and banger and marsh are on daily menu.

It's the same in many parts of Italy and Germany.

With a little time, I could probably give you a list of all the English communities in Italy. The most famous one, the beautiful Sorrento, has not been an Italian town for a long time. It's filled with English pubs, restaurants, takeaways, theatres, newsagent's shops, groceries, B&Bs, and everything else an English person could ever need. There is a well known saying in Campania, "If Sainsbury's (or Tesco) carries it, Sorrento has it."
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Old 08-19-2011, 09:04 PM
 
472 posts, read 793,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles in PGI View Post
In many parts of Spain, there is not a thing for Americans to join, but dozens of clubs, pubs, and areas where everyone drinks G&T, and banger and marsh are on daily menu.

It's the same in many parts of Italy and Germany.

With a little time, I could probably give you a list of all the English communities in Italy. The most famous one, the beautiful Sorrento, has not been an Italian town for a long time. It's filled with English pubs, restaurants, takeaways, theatres, newsagent's shops, groceries, B&Bs, and everything else an English person could ever need. There is a well known saying in Campania, "If Sainsbury's (or Tesco) carries it, Sorrento has it."
Right, but this is slightly unfair - you're looking at places that are far from the USA, but which are a couple of days' drive from England.
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Old 08-19-2011, 09:30 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
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Originally Posted by CHwboy View Post
Right, but this is slightly unfair - you're looking at places that are far from the USA, but which are a couple of days' drive from England.
Oh, I thought that's what the conversation is about, American and foreign travels, during which Americans were harshly criticized as ignorami, lazy, scaredy cats, wussies, etc. in comparison with travelers from other countries.

The critics of this thread refused to accept the fact that almost all countries (besides the ones in Central and South America) are much farther from the US than from other European countries, and Americans do not need to leave their country to find what Europeans, especially English and Germans, must travel to find.

The conversation veered to English vs. Americans when English Dave generously gave us an honest portrait of the typical English travelers.

Sorry if I helped to steer the thread even farther away from the original topic. I'm stepping back now, and leave the floor to others who are very patiently waiting to have the original topic back.
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Fairfax
2,880 posts, read 6,166,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHwboy View Post
Ah I love Americans. So quick to stereotype other countries ("the English only like to party!"), so defensive when anyone makes a claim about America ("way to generalise 300 million people!").


I suppose if it makes you feel superior to assume most American travelers shudder in fear of the thought of being in a foreign country without a 5 star hotel.....who are we to invade your world with the truth?
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Old 08-20-2011, 06:55 AM
 
472 posts, read 793,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles in PGI View Post
Oh, I thought that's what the conversation is about, American and foreign travels, during which Americans were harshly criticized as ignorami, lazy, scaredy cats, wussies, etc. in comparison with travelers from other countries.

The critics of this thread refused to accept the fact that almost all countries (besides the ones in Central and South America) are much farther from the US than from other European countries, and Americans do not need to leave their country to find what Europeans, especially English and Germans, must travel to find.

The conversation veered to English vs. Americans when English Dave generously gave us an honest portrait of the typical English travelers.

Sorry if I helped to steer the thread even farther away from the original topic. I'm stepping back now, and leave the floor to others who are very patiently waiting to have the original topic back.
My God, can you read? I was one of those who pointed to the US's geographical isolation.

What I was saying is that of course you're gonna find more english expats in 'clubs' in Europe -- there are far more English people there than Americans! I know that American expats tend to stick together in South America and East Asia, for example.
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