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Old 08-20-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,340,040 times
Reputation: 6670

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles in PGI View Post
In many parts of Spain, there is not a thing for Americans to join, but dozens of clubs, pubs, and areas where everyone drinks G&T, and banger and marsh are on daily menu.

It's the same in many parts of Italy and Germany.

With a little time, I could probably give you a list of all the English communities in Italy. The most famous one, the beautiful Sorrento, has not been an Italian town for a long time. It's filled with English pubs, restaurants, takeaways, theatres, newsagent's shops, groceries, B&Bs, and everything else an English person could ever need. There is a well known saying in Campania, "If Sainsbury's (or Tesco) carries it, Sorrento has it."
A Brit living in or retiring to Spain or Italy is much like somebody from Minnesota or New York doing the same in Florida. They both often seek a better climate, especially in the winter; only the American can do it in his or her own country, while the Brit must move abroad for significantly warmer and sunnier winters.

An American would only retire to Spain or Italy for the culture; an even better climate (as in better winters) can be had in a strip running from San Diego, CA to Miami, FL, and plus prices are generally lower in that region than Spain or Italy. For Brits, those countries are the most nearby, and therefore the most practical.
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:38 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,588,610 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHwboy View Post
My God, can you read? I was one of those who pointed to the US's geographical isolation.

There is ABSOLUTELY no need to be rude. You are not the critic to whom I referred. I could easily use your own words to strike back at you by asking whether you can read if you did not know at whom my statement was aimed. However, I will not be dragged into a contest to see who can insult whom better, so from now on, I will keep my silence to your remarks.

Good day.
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:47 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,588,610 times
Reputation: 2334
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
A Brit living in or retiring to Spain or Italy is much like somebody from Minnesota or New York doing the same in Florida. They both often seek a better climate, especially in the winter; only the American can do it in his or her own country, while the Brit must move abroad for significantly warmer and sunnier winters.
Very true. But the egotistical critics do not want to see that. To them, it's only an excuse.
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Old 08-26-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,663,993 times
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I visited Barcelona and had the best time. It's a nice cultural & bohemian city. Met a lot of Americans traveling there, which was very nice to see.
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Old 08-28-2011, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
8,566 posts, read 9,668,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I may be wrong, but I believe most Americans who go overseas only see the main attractions and don't get much of the experience. Europe has great high-speed trains and I bet many Americans who have visited there have never been on one.
I would think far too many americans take the bus tours and have little idea of where they had been.

As for the trains... I had completed a week of group bicycling the tulips in NL and was on the Thalys to Paris by way of Brussels. The train hit a truck crossing the tracks, I woke up to the train car rocking and dirt flying from the ground. I was thinking to myself how this didn't seem right as. The engine and first passenger car had derailed. My fellow passengers and I had to carry our luggage about a hundred yards to a local biergarden where we waited for buses to Brussels. From there I completed my trip by way of my Thalys connection, tho' at a much later hour. Arriving at Gare du Nord about midnite, a cab delivered me to some unknown street near the Bastille, where I had to find my hotel.

A week earlier I had arrived at Schiphol and took the train to Centraal Station. I had been warned that it was hard to get a room in A'dam that week but I had a reservation. Walking through the train terminal and out to get a cab, I found a sea of people. I had no prior idea what it meant that this was Queen's Day. No cabs, no bus... I just had to walk through the throngs of people till I found my hotel. And I didn't really know where it was. But... it was Queen's Day and I had all day to land.

Then there's always the adventure of waiting in line at the Prince Something or Other Theatre in London, trying to get a ticket to a sold out Mama Mia, refusing to pay the scalper's twice the price. The lights went down, the scalper let the tickets go for door price... orchestra, 7th row.

I once found myself in Geneva with a day to do nothing so took ride on the Lac Leman cruise. I thought I was going to be the only passenger until four unruly seniors hopped on board and partied their way to the (?bow?) front of the boat. At some point we introduced, it seems they were suitably impressed that I was from Texas, or when I commented how glad I was that New Zealand had just won the 'America's Cup'. One couple was from Australia, the other from New Zealand, on a 3 month cruise nearing its end.

I was once led into one of those clubs in Paris where the doorman opens a little window to decide if you get in. Illicit activities ensued until I discovered my wallet was missing. Breaking the action, with cig lighter I found my wallet with my Texaco card laying on top of it. My cash, both US and Francs was in a jeans pocket, my passport in my Tshirt pocket. That was the most fave wallet I've ever had, glad I found it. Other cc's were back in the hotel.

I mention these experiences for the americans who question whether or not there is any merit to travel. Don't deny yourself the opportunity of adventure. You can find yourself in experiences you'd never have in the U.S. You'll meet people you otherwise never meet at home. You won't have that quick cell phone call to someone to come pick you up or bring a can of gas.

It's like a whole 'nuther country... okay, that's what we say about Texas. But it is an adventure.
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Old 08-29-2011, 02:36 AM
 
3 posts, read 6,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I could more accurately start a thread that says "why do Americans travel more than any other nationality".
Please do that!
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Old 08-29-2011, 07:05 AM
 
Location: England
24,816 posts, read 6,174,478 times
Reputation: 30413
My wife and I were in Kusadasi in Turkey about 15 years ago. We decided to get away
from the tourists one night. We wandered the backstreets of a residencial area, and came
across a large bar full of turks, some with women, so we went in. There was a real belly
dancer performing, not like what you normally see in tourist haunts. She was the real McCoy,
sexy and sensual in her dance. The turks were really shouting her on, and when she came
near, putting money in her costume. All of sudden something was said, and a couple of
tables went flying, and fighting started. We got out quick, but what an experience. Travel
does broaden the mind!!
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