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Old 07-11-2011, 09:48 AM
 
Location: New York
1,339 posts, read 2,255,887 times
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Waldshut-Tiengen.

Waldshut-Tiengen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I haven't started my German lessons yet !! thats my excuse for appalling spelling and pronunciation !!
As my husband says - they will prob never give me a passport with my level of German !!

We just go to the normal supermarket there and have a nice lunch and drive home. We have been checked a few times even with swiss plates but don't do excessive shopping as is close enough to go back for a little drive out.
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Old 07-11-2011, 12:42 PM
 
14,253 posts, read 15,350,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post
I have to apologise Swisswife.
I checked with the *boss*, and she said, "Dunno anymore" ...
I thought it was a C&C, but it could have been some other big Grocery store.

BTW, where is Wildshut ?. I do know where Waldshut is ....

What I DO remember is all the Swiss license plates in the parking lot ...

@ Chielgirl: Even tho we lived around Bern (Erlach), we never shopped in France !

We were stopped a few times when we came back into Switzerland,
but we were driving a USA licensed car
(You can drive for two years with your US license plates),
then we changed to *CD* plates, and were never bothered again).
So I am not sure if we were stopped and checked because
we had a foreign license plate or for what other reason.
However we had 4 kids and the allotted amount of value you can bring in is *per person* !!!
We did find, after driving around there a while, a place where we could cross, without having Zoll there to check.
From my experience of living in Geneva ...... the Swiss tend to look more closely at:

- Swiss from outside the local canton(s). In the case of the Geneva crossings that mean't anyone with Swiss German plates

- Anyone with an "unusual" license plate (e.g. US).

- The big border crossing were usually less hassle than the small ones because they were busier and the agents have less time on their hands.

- There is no problem bringing in a few kilos of gold or a couple of million in cash but 125 grams/person of butter is your absolute limit.

From the perspective of the French:

- if it is raining they don't usually bother coming out of the office

- same if it is lunch time

- they will check any French car who is not from the local department

- Parisiens get special treatment (everyone hates them).

- the flying squad are a pain in the ass.
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Old 07-11-2011, 12:51 PM
 
Location: New York
1,339 posts, read 2,255,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaggy001 View Post
From my experience of living in Geneva ...... the Swiss tend to look more closely at:

- Swiss from outside the local canton(s). In the case of the Geneva crossings that mean't anyone with Swiss German plates

- Anyone with an "unusual" license plate (e.g. US).

- The big border crossing were usually less hassle than the small ones because they were busier and the agents have less time on their hands.

- There is no problem bringing in a few kilos of gold or a couple of million in cash but 125 grams/person of butter is your absolute limit.

From the perspective of the French:

- if it is raining they don't usually bother coming out of the office

- same if it is lunch time

- they will check any French car who is not from the local department

- Parisiens get special treatment (everyone hates them).

- the flying squad are a pain in the ass.
I can't rep you again ;( but I agree with all the above ! The limit on dairy is mad. My FIL argues that it protects Swiss farmers - but if they weren't so bloody expensive to start with no one would bother making an hour drive.....

When we tell local friends and family we go to Germany grocery shopping you should see the looks we get. Its worth saying you go there even if you don't.
I never understand why Swiss appear happy to overpay......
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:23 PM
 
14,253 posts, read 15,350,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swisswife View Post
I can't rep you again ;( but I agree with all the above ! The limit on dairy is mad. My FIL argues that it protects Swiss farmers - but if they weren't so bloody expensive to start with no one would bother making an hour drive.....

When we tell local friends and family we go to Germany grocery shopping you should see the looks we get. Its worth saying you go there even if you don't.
I never understand why Swiss appear happy to overpay......
I didn't tend to shop in France because it wasn't worth it for a single guy (as I was then). Easier just to go to the local Migros and get what I needed for dinner. But I did cross the border to go to the dentist where it was 50% of what a Swiss dentist wanted to charge.

The reason they protect Swiss farmers is social and not economic. They do not want the countryside to become depopulated. Without protection, farmers cannot compete with cheap EU imports and would be forced off the land and into other jobs.
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:12 PM
 
Location: New York
1,339 posts, read 2,255,887 times
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We are stocking up on things here before we move to Switzerland.
The mountain bike hubby wants to buy is 25% cheaper here. The Weber BBQ grill is a third of the price it would be in CH. The list goes on. As long as they are not 'new' when we ship them with the rest of our house contents we shouldn't have a problem.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:04 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
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I think there's an attitude that all Swiss should be able to make a decent living, and that's expensive. Lower prices in the rest of the world are often gained by exploiting and underpaying agricultural workers. Somehow it works for them even though economists would say that Swiss exports and services should be too expensive to compete in the open marketplace.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,301 posts, read 12,229,411 times
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From Wikipedia:

In nominal terms, Switzerland is one of the richest countries in the world by per capita gross domestic product, with a nominal per capita GDP of $69,838.[4] In 2010, Switzerland had the highest wealth per adult of any country in the world (with $372,692 for each person).[7] Switzerland also has one of the world's largest account balances as a percentage of GDP, only placing behind a few oil producing countries. Zurich and Geneva have respectively been ranked as the cities with the second and third highest quality of life in the world.[8] In 2010 the World Economic Forum ranked Switzerland as the most competitive country in the world,[9] while ranked by the European Union as Europe's most innovative country by far.[10]

.....Agricultural protectionism—a rare exception to Switzerland's free trade policies—has contributed to high food prices. Product market liberalisation is lagging behind many EU countries according to the OECD.[83] Nevertheless, domestic purchasing power is one of the best in the world.[85][86][87] Apart from agriculture, economic and trade barriers between the European Union and Switzerland are minimal and Switzerland has free trade agreements worldwide. Switzerland is a member of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA).



Good Lord, my parents should never have left there for the US. Well, I could move there if I had the money, I'm a dual citizen ...... but I've never been there even once, and don't speak any of the languages!
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:43 AM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,333 posts, read 11,066,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
Good Lord, my parents should never have left there for the US. Well, I could move there if I had the money, I'm a dual citizen ...... but I've never been there even once, and don't speak any of the languages!
That is because you really do not know what it is like to *really* live and work there !!!

Yes, it is a *rich* country, but there is also a lot of low income family there.
Not everything in Switzerland is like what you read, or see when you are a tourist.
Your parents left for a dang good reason, and you may be better off where you are.
Who says that your parents would be part of the *rich* people there ??
If they were not (I am pretty sure they were not, else why would they have come to the USA ??), you would probably not be also !!

I lived and worked there for a few years, but not because I wanted to work there. Absolutely NOT !!!. I was *asked* to live and worked there, by the Swiss government !!! Thinking of how my children *might* benefit, from going to school there (it is free for a long time !!) I accepted the assignment. Did we like it ? Jein !!! A combination of *Ja and Nein*.
It was so bloody expensive there, our spending capability was way less than it was *back home in California* !!!
Still wonder why so many Swiss people living near the borders, shop in Germany ???

No sirree ... stay where you are, do not forget where your ancestors came form, visit that country, and find *old Family*, then come back to the USA, the country which gave your parents a chance to probably better themselves ???

Last but not least, not all of Switzerland is beautiful mountains !!!
A lot of it is just plain flat !!!
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Old 07-12-2011, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Cottonwood CA
334 posts, read 948,272 times
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Thumbs up Beautiful Place

My wife and I visited Switzerland for two weeks last August. We stayed with friends for much of the time, so avoided some hotels costs. We also managed to take a train trip on our own for five days. We bought a four day Swiss-rail pass, and then just paid for our first day of travel. I'd highly recommend the Swiss-Rail pass that entiles the rider to travel anywhere their train system runs for the term of the pass. We toured pretty much the entire country, including Bern, Lausanne, Montreauz, Zurich and the gorgeous "Glacier Express" train from Zermatt to St. Moritz. Our friends also took us by car to see Rhine Falls, the Aare canyon, and Lake Lucerne.

The Swiss frank and dollar were essentially equal during our stay so it was easy to compare value. We ate at a McDonalds (in Baden) and paid teh equivalent of $26.00 for two Quarter Pounder meals! We were surprised that our single meal on the Glacier Express, with two sodas, cost about 100 Swiss franks-about $100.00-and it was good, Stroganoff as I recall, but not anything special.

We had little trouble communicating, even though we speak only English. It was easy to find english speakers in both the German and French speaking regions. We really didn't get to the Italian speaking area.

Also, be advised that quoted hotel rates are typically "per-person". So, what seems like a deal, really isn't. In spite of the costs, we had a terrific time and enjoyed the splender of the Alps, and the verdant farmlands. It's really a special place.
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Old 07-12-2011, 11:27 AM
 
Location: New York
1,339 posts, read 2,255,887 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaybee View Post
My wife and I visited Switzerland for two weeks last August. We stayed with friends for much of the time, so avoided some hotels costs. We also managed to take a train trip on our own for five days. We bought a four day Swiss-rail pass, and then just paid for our first day of travel. I'd highly recommend the Swiss-Rail pass that entiles the rider to travel anywhere their train system runs for the term of the pass. We toured pretty much the entire country, including Bern, Lausanne, Montreauz, Zurich and the gorgeous "Glacier Express" train from Zermatt to St. Moritz. Our friends also took us by car to see Rhine Falls, the Aare canyon, and Lake Lucerne.

The Swiss frank and dollar were essentially equal during our stay so it was easy to compare value. We ate at a McDonalds (in Baden) and paid teh equivalent of $26.00 for two Quarter Pounder meals! We were surprised that our single meal on the Glacier Express, with two sodas, cost about 100 Swiss franks-about $100.00-and it was good, Stroganoff as I recall, but not anything special.

We had little trouble communicating, even though we speak only English. It was easy to find english speakers in both the German and French speaking regions. We really didn't get to the Italian speaking area.

Also, be advised that quoted hotel rates are typically "per-person". So, what seems like a deal, really isn't. In spite of the costs, we had a terrific time and enjoyed the splender of the Alps, and the verdant farmlands. It's really a special place.
yes the rail passes are great. I get one nearly every year from MIL so I can go to Italy for a birthday lunch Its a beautiful journey from Zurich !!
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