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Old 07-17-2011, 01:43 AM
 
Location: U.S.A.
94 posts, read 194,496 times
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Yes, as the OP I thought this article would be interesting to a forum full of travelers. I thought it was interesting how he portrayed the negative aspects of being a long term traveler.

As a young 19 year old from America, who has a lot of ambitions to travel the world and say "**** a 9-5", this article brings things to attention I never did think of. I never did imagine how traveling the world would add nothing to my resume and career. I never did fear coming home and seeing all my friends with 'a life', and me, with just a head full of memories. I thought travel was GOOD for you, and it made me think of I could lose a feeling of home.

Not that I agree with it all, just made me think about traveling the world carelessly a bit differently.
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Old 07-17-2011, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,791 posts, read 7,699,177 times
Reputation: 17728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ez Mode Pls View Post
Yes, as the OP I thought this article would be interesting to a forum full of travelers. I thought it was interesting how he portrayed the negative aspects of being a long term traveler.

As a young 19 year old from America, who has a lot of ambitions to travel the world and say "**** a 9-5", this article brings things to attention I never did think of. I never did imagine how traveling the world would add nothing to my resume and career. I never did fear coming home and seeing all my friends with 'a life', and me, with just a head full of memories. I thought travel was GOOD for you, and it made me think of I could lose a feeling of home.

Not that I agree with it all, just made me think about traveling the world carelessly a bit differently.
Maybe it's like they say: everything in moderation. Travel is good for you but take it to excess, and not surprisingly, you won't be able to connect with your family and friends back home who live a more routine life. Travel might not add anything to your resume or career, but it will definitely add something valuable to you, as a person.
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Old 07-17-2011, 04:41 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,962,104 times
Reputation: 13245
Quote:
Originally Posted by takeo3 View Post
travelling is nice, but after a while I think you need some stability, some place you can call "home".
Others may disagree, but that's how I feel. However, I did move around a bit as a child. Home is where the heart is, but I do enjoy putting down a few roots, even if I pull them up and shake them out from time to time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post

Thus my message: if anyone wants to see the real culprit for their problems, they should take a good look at their closest mirror. It never lies.
Yes. Remember that cheesy old song, "I've been all around the world, but I've never been to me."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Some travel fanatics can come across as quite up themselves. Because they've traveled so extensively, they have an arrogant, know-it-all, "since I've traveled so much I'm more enlightened than you boring people with your boring lives" attitude. I've known a few like that. You can't engage with them or share travel experiences with them. It's almost like a competition for them, like their whole sense of worth is based on how much more well-traveled they are than others. Because they've spent months in a country versus your own 2 weeks, or if you didn't go to their favourite city/area, they act as if you just haven't really experienced the country at all, almost dismissing your effort as a waste of time, silly you. They're obnoxious bores.

And for many, travel is just not in their budget so hearing long-winded stories about other people's travels might make them feel bad about not being able to afford it themselves.
Yes, yes, and yes, especially what I bolded.
If you just remember this part, from what the German guy in the blog said, you'll be okay--it encompasses a lot in just a few words. "At some point it doesnít matter anymore which country you are in."

Travel is supposed to *enhance* your life, not uphold it.
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Old 07-17-2011, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Out West
22,837 posts, read 16,900,943 times
Reputation: 26368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ez Mode Pls View Post
Yes, as the OP I thought this article would be interesting to a forum full of travelers. I thought it was interesting how he portrayed the negative aspects of being a long term traveler.

As a young 19 year old from America, who has a lot of ambitions to travel the world and say "**** a 9-5", this article brings things to attention I never did think of. I never did imagine how traveling the world would add nothing to my resume and career. I never did fear coming home and seeing all my friends with 'a life', and me, with just a head full of memories. I thought travel was GOOD for you, and it made me think of I could lose a feeling of home.

Not that I agree with it all, just made me think about traveling the world carelessly a bit differently.
I have traveled a lot but not always in the way that this article is talking about. I moved around a LOT as a child and with that came the almost impossibility of staying in one place for too long.

I have traveled to many places as a child although we had a home and went to school and led a "normal" life...which including moving around.

I traveled when I got out of school taking a job that would LET ME go live in a foreign country and because of that, be able to visit all types of other countries around it.

I have moved and moved and moved again. I worked for cruise lines so I could travel. I've done courier jobs so that I could do traveling in the U.S. and Canada.

Has it enriched my life? YES! I have seen a lot of things, met a lot of people, been around all types of different cultures and frankly, all of that has turned me in to the person I am today.

Has it also been a hindrance? YES! I have no place that I call "home" in the sense that many people have, ie: Someone has moved to another state but always talks about "back home"...I don't have that. I don't tend to have long lasting relationships, (ie friendships), because I am always moving around, meeting new people. I don't have a place where my roots are. At times, I don't like that. Other times, I don't mind it.

I also agree with another poster that hardly anyone asks me about WHERE I traveled, about that place I traveled. I lived in Germany for three years and all I typically get is, "You lived in Germany? I'm so jealous!" (Of what? Find a way to live there, too, if you want.) But they don't ask me what life was like, how did I see the Germans living, what was their day to day, where would be good places to go, how did they act, etc. The most I get is, "Did you get to see the Berlin Wall before it came down?" Sigh.

I certainly don't travel for others, to say, "look at me! I've traveled all over!" I did it because I enjoy seeing the world, enjoy meeting other people, enjoy experiencing different cultures, (yes, some cultures I'm not in to), and taking from each one a little something to enrich my own life that makes me happy.

Traveling a lot has many positives but yes, there are a good number of negatives, as well. Yes, you CAN feel isolated or having a sense of "not belonging". You can feel like an outsider looking in. You can have a hard time keeping long friendships.

It's up to the individual to decide which is more fitting with their lives. If they long, too much, for normalcy, it's time to cut back on the traveling or moving. If they still yearn to see more, (the world is huge), and don't mind that they don't have a "home" (although I agree home is where the heart is), get confused looks from people, run the risk of potential employers to view them as flaky because they move around so much, (as they save money to continue traveling), can adapt easily, can live anywhere in many different circumstances that aren't necessarily always in comfort, and can embrace the world instead of using it as a yard stick to measure their worth over anothers who doesn't travel, and is confident they won't have regrets when they are older, then continue traveling.

Anyone who gets a big head over it, they are not traveling for the right reasons.
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:29 AM
 
8,266 posts, read 10,729,476 times
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Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Everyone has their own interests and while Americans get smeared as being country bumpkins that don't care about the rest of the world, I have found in my travels just as many if not more, uninformed, ignorant, uninterested people out there in the world as the USA.

This view that America sucks and the rest of the world has this incredible, enlightened view and great peace and acceptance is a major fallacy perpetrated by leftist pseudo intellectuals.
I'm considering signing up four or five fake CityData accounts just for the purposes of repping you more on this. It's almost like the "cool" thing for people some people who have traveled to do, I think it feeds their ego making them feel even more special since they can be one of the rare enlightened ones.
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:37 AM
 
8,266 posts, read 10,729,476 times
Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Ultimately you get older and sicker and those that worked sporadically and blew all their money on travel
I've wondered about this aspect of it. We've had plenty of long conversations with perpetual traveler types all over the world, and many envision doing it forever. I imagine the prospect of continuing the cycle of working for awhile while living in crappy apartment with three roommates to save up money for the next year of travel appeals to them in their 20s but imagine in their 50s?

Sure there are a few of 'em, the older perpetual travelers but the overwhelming majority it is a young person's game. Maybe the gap-year temporary-dreadlocks types skew the numbers enough to give a false impression a little, but not that much. Eventually most people want to settle down.
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Old 07-17-2011, 09:18 AM
 
Location: London
1,587 posts, read 3,249,383 times
Reputation: 1324
What's wrong with having a job and taking time off for vacation? That's what I do. It doesn't have to be a choice between a 9–5 and world travel.
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Old 07-17-2011, 09:46 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 18,008,236 times
Reputation: 14678
One of these days I want to save up some money and then take three weeks off just to drive all over the United States.
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Old 07-17-2011, 10:18 AM
 
47,573 posts, read 60,745,415 times
Reputation: 22283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
But, I think a traveler can always settle down whenever they want as well.

I also agree of the merits of having family and friends that you've known for ages. When I go back to Michigan, and see my own family roots there, I do feel envious of people who have that.

In the end, I know some people are envious of my life, and others not so much. I'm sometimes envious of their stability, but at the same time, not so much to stabilize myself.

I think in the end, we can really only be ourselves. I can't personally imagine living any other way than the way I already have.
Yes, to each his own. I think some people just have some kind of gypsy spirit that makes them never want to permanently settle down.

I remember getting the itch to travel and see the world so I did, what world I could afford and it was fantastic, it made me leave my hometown. I went back for a school reunion and got to talking to some former classmate who was thrilled she and her husband had just bought a house near the house she grew up in. The only sad thing is wasn't the house immediately next door but the next closest.

When you travel, you meet and get to talk to other people, but those who stay put get to talk to the same people they were always close to. While I was out finding other things, I gave up knowing what was going on back home. Either side can accuse the other of being shallow - but it's not that, it's what pulls you.

I think being a happy traveler requires that you lack the ability to bond extremely closely with people. You have to be able to say bye and move on. Some people might travel a little but their hearts are always with their families, their roots, and they want to soon return. Others might travel a little and then want to always see new places or decide they want to give up their hometown and live elsewhere.
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Old 07-17-2011, 10:25 AM
 
47,573 posts, read 60,745,415 times
Reputation: 22283
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
I've wondered about this aspect of it. We've had plenty of long conversations with perpetual traveler types all over the world, and many envision doing it forever. I imagine the prospect of continuing the cycle of working for awhile while living in crappy apartment with three roommates to save up money for the next year of travel appeals to them in their 20s but imagine in their 50s?

Sure there are a few of 'em, the older perpetual travelers but the overwhelming majority it is a young person's game. Maybe the gap-year temporary-dreadlocks types skew the numbers enough to give a false impression a little, but not that much. Eventually most people want to settle down.
There are people in their 50's who have big travel plans. Many can't wait until retirement and off they'll go.

My dad is in his 80s but now he's got it in him to work in those camp grounds as a camp ground host. He loves doing that because he gets to pack up, head south, go somewhere different and meet up with his fellow "semi-travelers".

There are others like people who travel for their jobs, long distance truck drivers can live their lives on the highway, airline pilots, hostesses travel for a living, in fact many jobs require at least 25-50% travel. There are HVAC service and repair guys who travel to other countries to fix big units.
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