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Old 07-17-2011, 11:11 AM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,598,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
I've wondered about this aspect of it. We've had plenty of long conversations with perpetual traveler types all over the world, and many envision doing it forever. I imagine the prospect of continuing the cycle of working for awhile while living in crappy apartment with three roommates to save up money for the next year of travel appeals to them in their 20s but imagine in their 50s?

Sure there are a few of 'em, the older perpetual travelers but the overwhelming majority it is a young person's game. Maybe the gap-year temporary-dreadlocks types skew the numbers enough to give a false impression a little, but not that much. Eventually most people want to settle down.
Well I have witnessed those types and had some as roommates in Vail, in their 50's and 60's, bumming from season to season, saving up some magic number of dollars they need to travel and then going away, bumming around some more, turning back up into town 6-12 months later with $8 to their name, hoping to get their job back.

As I said, I've known many of these people and mentally they all adopt the fugitive mentality. It's almost like they are on the run and they live just like it. One of my friends who recognized his problems always said everywhere you go there you are and there is no geographic cure.

I think in your 20's it is cool to travel a bit, but eventually one needs some type of stability in their life for their mental, physical and spiritual needs. And I think it is great to have a sabbatical later in life as well.

Here is a trip report of a guy that traveled South and Central America for 2 years before going back to work recently. He made a good point at the end of his trip:

IMO this trip is really nothing that special or unusual. I was just another lucky dummy that had the time and cash to pull off a couple years on the road. It was a great experience, and I wouldn't trade it for the world, but I had to keep it in perspective, I was just riding a motorcycle.

No Fumar Español: South from San Diego - ADVrider
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Old 07-17-2011, 11:29 AM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,598,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ez Mode Pls View Post
Yes, as the OP I thought this article would be interesting to a forum full of travelers. I thought it was interesting how he portrayed the negative aspects of being a long term traveler.

As a young 19 year old from America, who has a lot of ambitions to travel the world and say "**** a 9-5", this article brings things to attention I never did think of. I never did imagine how traveling the world would add nothing to my resume and career. I never did fear coming home and seeing all my friends with 'a life', and me, with just a head full of memories. I thought travel was GOOD for you, and it made me think of I could lose a feeling of home.

Not that I agree with it all, just made me think about traveling the world carelessly a bit differently.
When you are 19 sometimes things in the future seem so far away. I am 36 now and I wonder where the time has gone, 19 doesn't seem that far away and I thought then I had all the time in the world back then. Someday you'll be 40, 50, 60, 70.

So some balance is good, I think it is great to travel and experience but you have to keep it in perspective in that some day you have to earn a living and someday when you are older you might not want to be working a $10 an hour job, trying to survive.

A lot of the travelers I knew were from Australia, it is almost expected that university students have a "gap year" or something to travel and experience the world. They would come over to the USA on a temp work visa, work for 4 months, save and then travel Europe or South America and then maybe come back and repeat the process, but eventually they would go back to school and get a "real job" and some of them have been very successful in their careers as well.

And to me career is important as I'd like to maximize what I earn in an hour and use my time to it's greatest benefit. So when I do travel I can enjoy it and in the future have wealth to be able to do some of the things I want to do without having to worry. Why work for $10 an hour when you can invest some years in education and skills development and make a $50-100 an hour?
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Old 07-17-2011, 11:35 AM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,598,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute View Post
There are people in their 50's who have big travel plans. Many can't wait until retirement and off they'll go.

My dad is in his 80s but now he's got it in him to work in those camp grounds as a camp ground host. He loves doing that because he gets to pack up, head south, go somewhere different and meet up with his fellow "semi-travelers".

There are others like people who travel for their jobs, long distance truck drivers can live their lives on the highway, airline pilots, hostesses travel for a living, in fact many jobs require at least 25-50% travel. There are HVAC service and repair guys who travel to other countries to fix big units.
Definitely there are jobs that have travel involved for those that are interested in that.

With my work I travel and in the last year mostly go to the same place, but in previous years I was able to tour northern New England, take a 5000 mile trip on the west coast in a brand new BMW, see the Grand Canyon twice as well as much of the rest of the USA.
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:34 PM
 
8,266 posts, read 10,723,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute View Post
There are people in their 50's who have big travel plans. Many can't wait until retirement and off they'll go.

My dad is in his 80s but now he's got it in him to work in those camp grounds as a camp ground host. He loves doing that because he gets to pack up, head south, go somewhere different and meet up with his fellow "semi-travelers".

There are others like people who travel for their jobs, long distance truck drivers can live their lives on the highway, airline pilots, hostesses travel for a living, in fact many jobs require at least 25-50% travel. There are HVAC service and repair guys who travel to other countries to fix big units.
Completely different set of people that who I'm referring to, there is a big difference between someone traveling for work or taking extended trips after retiring and vagabonding types.
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Old 07-17-2011, 01:55 PM
 
253 posts, read 165,345 times
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I'm one of those that wish I could travel constantly. I just simply do not have the money & it's depressing & frustrating. I wish I had Anthony Bourdain's job, that would be the ultimate. There's nothing wrong w/having wanderlust. I have an ex who keeps moving from state to state & sometimes I'm like don't you just want to settle down?? But mostly I'm envious. And jtur, I cannot BELIEVE no one asks you about your travels. That's just depressing, I would be so hurt if no one wanted to know about my travels. I love asking people about their trips.
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,791 posts, read 7,695,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
One of these days I want to save up some money and then take three weeks off just to drive all over the United States.
Sounds brilliant! One of my favourite holidays is roadtripping through American states. I've done a few in the past, will do as many more as I can in the future. Your park system is amazing with some awe-inspiring landscape.
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Old 07-17-2011, 07:17 PM
 
47,573 posts, read 60,710,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
Completely different set of people that who I'm referring to, there is a big difference between someone traveling for work or taking extended trips after retiring and vagabonding types.
I know they're different, but someone can have a love of travel, love living on the road and still manage to work for a living.

Maybe those who live on the edge and use travel as an excuse to get away use it as an excuse not to work for a living, to avoid responsibilities. But someone can love life on the highway or flying from one city to another and living out of hotels and be productive, they just found ways.
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Old 07-18-2011, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,038,846 times
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Travel is an addiction and a drug of sorts for me. I can relate to so much which has been said.

My Father was first an Army Officer then a Diplomat so I literally have been moving around since I was a baby. And on whole pretty much always loved it. I also travelled around the world on my own as much as I could and now that I am older and married travel is still something I can never get enough of.

I like my house but I don't think I will ever truly feel at "home" anywhere , truth be told. Home to me is where I am at the time I suppose. I have had a lot of long term health problems in recent years and am now disabled ( not in a wheelchair but bad enough to make walking quite painful and difficult) so my days of truly adventurous traveling are now behind me, the hiking and camping and the truly out of the way places. And it kills me.

Hubby and I travel as much as we possibly can and it is never enough. I need to be on the move, I need to be somewhere new, somewhere not where I am.

Wanderlust is a potent drug and one which can ruin your life if it remains unsatisfied. I cannot comprehend people who prefer to stay at home. I cannot understand how anyone would prefer to potter around the house , or sit in front of the TV rather than travel. It is literally beyond my intellectual grasp.

Wanderlust can be a terrible thing because you are never truly happy where you are and there is always a new horizon, a new somewhere else.... I am bored so easily.

I now lead a life where I feel trapped by my body and it is one of the most depressing and upsetting thing in the world. We travel whenever we can but I can't ever fill that desire for more. The worst feeling for me is knowing you are about to come home. I feel so empty and so down. Like a drug you get highs and then the lows of course.

Should I ever win the lottery I would simply get up and carry on going until I dropped. Hubby shares my love of travel to a certain extent but like most people he also likes being home and somewhere more familiar. My travels sustain me in my daily life. I am either thinking about past travels or planning future ones. Life without travel to me would not be worth living. It sounds over-dramatic but it genuinely feels like that. There is nothing so satisfying, so wonderfully potent and pleasurable as traveling to me anyway.

My brain is not wired to be "homely". It just isn't me and having this state of being imposed on me by my physical limitations is a form of mental torture and deep cruelty. I am not domesticated, I never was. I think I counted more than 37 schools I went to most of them in different countries. I never had roots. I don't think I truly want them either though it would be nice to be more "normal".

Home to me is one of the most depressing words in the language. Even during a normal week I will just want to go out in the evenings and do something, be it a concert, movie, play or lecture.Anything not to be home. It is that deep a problem and that pathetic. Truly , horrendous.


I just hope that my health will improve and that I can start again where I left off. True exploring. Nowhere off limits. Nothing I cannot do. That to me would be heaven.

One of my ultimate dream would be to sail around the world hugging the coasts as much as possible.


I also would love to do a Nunavut to Patagonia , back up through the West Coast of South America ending up in the Aleutian Islands or Northern Territories. A few years on the road savouring all the places on the way . Perfect.


But to be honest at the moment I will take almost anything as long as it's not resorts or cruises. Travel takes you out of yourself and the sense of utter freedom is so liberating.

But there is a price to pay, the price of never quite fitting anywhere. And sometimes it can truly feel like a terrible burden.

I was born more or less in a "suitcase" and I would quite happily die in one too !

At the end of the day though people should be true to themselves be they home-bodies or travel addicts like myself. I think my upbringing spoilt me and rendered me incapable of truly appreciating stability for too long. There would be no problem if I could just leave and go as I please but I can't and therein lies the issue...

The road is always calling and its siren call so seductive and tempting that I find myself always wanting to get out and about. I really can't help it. I will for example be having a fabulous time in New Mexico on some great Native American Historical site and wishing at the very same time I could be in Chile or Laos... Enough is not in my vocabulary when it comes to travel. Sadly for me. And it hurts. A lot.
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Old 07-18-2011, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Midwestern Dystopia
2,373 posts, read 3,063,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The average person who has been to school in Colombia or Malaysia knows more about Europe than a recent president of the United States did. Of course there are bumpkins everywhere, but that doesn't mean the typical educated person has been systematically sealed off from the rest of the world, as they are in the US. How many of the channels on your cable lineup originate in other countries? How many members of your extended family will sit and watch a subtitled movie with you? The whole world watches mostly foreign TV and subtitled foreign movies most of the time, except the US and China, and in China people risk arrest to expose themselves to global understanding, while Americans take pride in their ignorance of the world.

If you live in a country where most TV shows and most movies and most magazines come from another country, how can you help having some awareness of what those other countries are like? Which has absolutely nothing to do with peace and acceptance, or what sucks.
unless you live in Detroit, Buffalo or Seattle you can't even get the CBC here. It always amazes me how insular we are. I mean we can't even get one channel of our nearest, cultural neighbors.

meanwhile, people can get CNN overseas, Canadians can get our network t.v., you can get US network t.v. in Austria on cable if you really want.

Pick up the British magazine The Economist and they have sections with 3-5 articles devoted to the US, Britian, Europe, Africa/middle east, the Americas and Asia along with the usual business, finance, science/technology, arts,

Now pick up a copy of US News and "World" Report, Time, Newsweek and go to the "international" section, it's like 2 pages.

but when you live in the "best country in the world (TM)" I guess you have no reason to look any further.
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Old 07-18-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,522 posts, read 5,470,226 times
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I spent 3 years on the road and totally agree. Travel is a drug,

I hated comming back to Australia only to find everything so clean, orderd and expensive, and with all these stupid rules that i hated. (Also the main reason i never went to the USA of Canada)

In the end my parents basically bribed me to stay at home.

Then i met my wife, who's got her feet firmly planted on the ground, - problem solved.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 07-18-2011 at 06:39 PM..
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