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Old 07-24-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
2,168 posts, read 4,193,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHwboy View Post
Let's put some perspective on this. You are interested in travel. Their are lots of things you're not interested in, perhaps backcountry hiking, cosplay, fine wines, video games or impressionist art.

Suppose a friend of yours had a big experience with one of these things for a few weeks (a visit to a few museums, a new games console comes out, they get a case of wine, or they go on a 3 day hike in the grand canyon). You're happy for them, but you don't particularly share their interest.

So what would be wrong with you just asking a few vague questions like, 'how did it go'? You don't want to hear the details of every fire they made at the campsite, or how the different riojas compared to one another, or whether call of duty 7 or 8 has a more immersive action experience. You just want to know that they had a good time.

See why people might not care about all the petty details of your latest vacation?
I wouldn't expect most of my friends to care much or at all, but I would expect that certain of my friends--especially those with vocal, self-proclaimed interests in other cultures and cuisines--to show some curiosity.
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Old 07-24-2011, 06:53 PM
 
5,269 posts, read 3,311,295 times
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Having lived and worked in Antarctica for multipy contract seasons (and about to go back for another), I do have the freedom to travel a bit around the world when I'm "seasonally retired" and I have met people from all over the world, locals and tourists (also traveling) ask, "so why do you have so much free time to travel?" (since they know I'm American) and "so what do you do for a living?"

And I usually just say, "I'm a contract worker." Then they'll ask what kind of contract work, and I'll say, "Science Support." It takes a lot to get me mention where I work and when and if I mention the "A" word, I usually get 3 different responses when I finally mention it.

Either the person's head is about to explode and they start to rattle off 1,000 questions about what it's like there, the second response is, people think I said Alaska and how was it "up there" or the third and final response is, that people just don't care and say, "oh that's nice."

I'm sort of learning to like the last response, since while I don't mind answering a bunch of questions, it does get old and I just don't want to be know as "that guy who works in Antarctica." I did give an hour long powerpoint once to my nephew's third grade class back home and they seemed to enjoy and like it.

Having lived the nomadic lifestyle for the last 4 and a half years, it's definitely not for everybody, especially if you want to get married, settle down and have children.

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Old 07-25-2011, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,012,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
Having lived and worked in Antarctica for multipy contract seasons (and about to go back for another), I do have the freedom to travel a bit around the world when I'm "seasonally retired" and I have met people from all over the world, locals and tourists (also traveling) ask, "so why do you have so much free time to travel?" (since they know I'm American) and "so what do you do for a living?"

And I usually just say, "I'm a contract worker." Then they'll ask what kind of contract work, and I'll say, "Science Support." It takes a lot to get me mention where I work and when and if I mention the "A" word, I usually get 3 different responses when I finally mention it.

Either the person's head is about to explode and they start to rattle off 1,000 questions about what it's like there, the second response is, people think I said Alaska and how was it "up there" or the third and final response is, that people just don't care and say, "oh that's nice."

I'm sort of learning to like the last response, since while I don't mind answering a bunch of questions, it does get old and I just don't want to be know as "that guy who works in Antarctica." I did give an hour long powerpoint once to my nephew's third grade class back home and they seemed to enjoy and like it.

Having lived the nomadic lifestyle for the last 4 and a half years, it's definitely not for everybody, especially if you want to get married, settle down and have children.
I agree, I have been "almost everywhere" as Hubby always moans at me and quite frankly most of the time I don't really mention it socially. Most people aren't really interested anyway and those who are can be so earnest I feel like a travel guide to some people.

Travel does change you one way or another and as you say it is not for everyone.

I personally cannot comprehend why people do not answer the call of the road , especially those with no commitment but to each their own .


I don't feel superior in any way but I often end up feeling disappointed with people who have never been somewhere and make firm assertions about those places ( like the Middle east, a part of the world I know well and love and which is often misunderstood and often offensively mistreated ). We are all free to love or hate certain places but to judge them without having been there to me is stupidity incarnated....

Basically it is like food, unless you have tried it, never go "ewwwwwwwww gross" it does not reflect well on the person saying it IMo.

BTW has anyone pointed out you look just like Prince William ?

I loved Antarctica ( mostly Terre Adelie) but living there for longer than a month really would not be my cup of tea. A friend of my Husband lived at the British Antarctic Survey Base for 3 years and apparently became rather good at snowboarding and skiing ! He loved it though. I could imagine living in Greenland ( which I adored) but not the Antarctic.

I know not really comparable places, but I am thinking in terms of genuinely cold climates.
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Old 07-25-2011, 10:46 AM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,569,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
I personally cannot comprehend why people do not answer the call of the road , especially those with no commitment but to each their own .
Well that is the thing, most people out there have commitments to maintain of some sort. Families, houses, jobs. To travel you have to have money and that means jobs. Obviously there are people that can mooch off of relatives, the government or some other scheme to do that, but that can only last so long.

A lot of people also, they don't mind the simple life. A lot of people might be content just to go boating on the weekend or to hang out in their backyard. Can't blame them.

As for the call of the open road, I have traveled quite a bit for myself and for work. There is always a day when I am ready to go home and a lot of times travel isn't romantic, glamorous or fun.
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Old 07-25-2011, 10:51 AM
 
28,232 posts, read 39,872,938 times
Reputation: 36735
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The thing that I found when I got back from traveling, was that nobody asked me anything about where I had been. Literally Nobody.. I guess they were just too embarrassed to ask question like "Just where IS Africa, anyway?" Or else, Americans are so comfortable in their abject ignorance and malinformation about the rest of the world, they don't want any facts or reality to disturb their slumber. Every once in a while, somebody will hear about something outside the USA that fascinates them, and they will ask me "Did you see the Great Wall of China?" No. End of conversation, change the subject. Unless it occurs to them to add "You mean you went all the way to China, and didn't see the Great Wall?" These are the same people that, if they knew you had been all over the USA, would ask if you if you've ever been to the Mall of America.

That's how Lonely Planet has destroyed my cultural and intellectual and spiritual link with Americans.
Or maybe they simply didn't care....
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Old 07-25-2011, 12:01 PM
 
Location: IL
2,992 posts, read 4,417,195 times
Reputation: 3085
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHwboy View Post
Let's put some perspective on this. You are interested in travel. Their are lots of things you're not interested in, perhaps backcountry hiking, cosplay, fine wines, video games or impressionist art.

Suppose a friend of yours had a big experience with one of these things for a few weeks (a visit to a few museums, a new games console comes out, they get a case of wine, or they go on a 3 day hike in the grand canyon). You're happy for them, but you don't particularly share their interest.

So what would be wrong with you just asking a few vague questions like, 'how did it go'? You don't want to hear the details of every fire they made at the campsite, or how the different riojas compared to one another, or whether call of duty 7 or 8 has a more immersive action experience. You just want to know that they had a good time.

See why people might not care about all the petty details of your latest vacation?
That's really it. I had a friend and he would tell me the fine points of TV shows, like a 3 minute overview of a 30 minute TV show. It drove me crazy, but it really interested him. I just couldn't pay attention as he would blather on about TV shows I had zero interest in...but, I bet he felt the same way sometimes when I would tell stories. He did teach me a valuable lesson...get to the point and relate stories to my listeners life or interests.
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Old 07-25-2011, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,012,684 times
Reputation: 19908
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Well that is the thing, most people out there have commitments to maintain of some sort. Families, houses, jobs. To travel you have to have money and that means jobs. Obviously there are people that can mooch off of relatives, the government or some other scheme to do that, but that can only last so long.

A lot of people also, they don't mind the simple life. A lot of people might be content just to go boating on the weekend or to hang out in their backyard. Can't blame them.

As for the call of the open road, I have traveled quite a bit for myself and for work. There is always a day when I am ready to go home and a lot of times travel isn't romantic, glamorous or fun.
I understand that travel requires commitment but I suppose I don't understand this "simple life" concept. Going boating at the week-end soudns fabulous to me actually, hanging out in the backyard however is my idea of hell !

A lot of my younger, fitter and healthier friends seem to have no desire to see the world and when they do travel all they seem to enjoy is what I call blandness personified like resorts. I just don't get it. I love them to bits but it puzzles me.

I have never really thought of travel as romantic or glamourous actually, I see it more in terms of new experiences in my life and a sense of learning about new places, cultures, foods etc... A lot of my travel especially in my younger days was certainly not romantic or glamourous but I loved every uncomfortable minute of it.

I suppose I am just someone who ever wants to come home. Home is just too familiar to be that interesting to me. I get bored and restless. And I actually envy people who are content with being where they are. I sometimes think it must be nice to have roots and belong somewhere. I never had that.

I think about traveling even in my dreams which is how sick it is. Being in one place too long makes me feel trapped and claustrophobic. And the sad part is that where I live at the moment is about as much "home"as I am ever going to feel . I love where I live ,I just don't want to live there for ever. I don't really want to live anywhere too long basically. A couple of years in each place to me is about ideal. A few months in some depending on the place.

Even as a kid on the whole I always felt this frisson of excitement when my Father came in and told me we were moving on. It never took me long to pack. I always felt I could always come back to the places which I really loved. Every new school was like a new adventure.
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Old 07-25-2011, 09:08 PM
 
5 posts, read 6,649 times
Reputation: 10
lonely planet is a conformist travelers guide i hate lonely planet due to the destuction of culture an2local peoples mentality goto any where in south east asia that you read about in lonely planet and you will see too many tourists , people will look at you like an atm machine
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Old 07-25-2011, 11:16 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,569,470 times
Reputation: 7604
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
I understand that travel requires commitment but I suppose I don't understand this "simple life" concept. Going boating at the week-end soudns fabulous to me actually, hanging out in the backyard however is my idea of hell !

A lot of my younger, fitter and healthier friends seem to have no desire to see the world and when they do travel all they seem to enjoy is what I call blandness personified like resorts. I just don't get it. I love them to bits but it puzzles me.

I have never really thought of travel as romantic or glamourous actually, I see it more in terms of new experiences in my life and a sense of learning about new places, cultures, foods etc... A lot of my travel especially in my younger days was certainly not romantic or glamourous but I loved every uncomfortable minute of it.

I suppose I am just someone who ever wants to come home. Home is just too familiar to be that interesting to me. I get bored and restless. And I actually envy people who are content with being where they are. I sometimes think it must be nice to have roots and belong somewhere. I never had that.

I think about traveling even in my dreams which is how sick it is. Being in one place too long makes me feel trapped and claustrophobic. And the sad part is that where I live at the moment is about as much "home"as I am ever going to feel . I love where I live ,I just don't want to live there for ever. I don't really want to live anywhere too long basically. A couple of years in each place to me is about ideal. A few months in some depending on the place.

Even as a kid on the whole I always felt this frisson of excitement when my Father came in and told me we were moving on. It never took me long to pack. I always felt I could always come back to the places which I really loved. Every new school was like a new adventure.
Well what I mean by the simple life is that there are a lot of people that are content with working 9-5 monday thru friday, having a spouse, 2 kids, a car and a trip to disneyworld. Pizza on friday night, mow the lawn on saturday, watch foot ball on sunday.

And you need those people because otherwise nothing would get done out there in the world.

I don't aspire to that life, but I understand why people do.

And a lot of those people don't want to get out and "experience" all that because often times travel is not fun, not comfortable and not a great learning experience. Which is why people go to resorts.

One thing I remember hearing is that by the time you hit your mid 30's you are looking for comfort. I've seen that transition in myself. Just not interested in staying fleabag hotels and hostels anymore.
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Old 07-26-2011, 05:40 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,909,074 times
Reputation: 13245
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Well what I mean by the simple life is that there are a lot of people that are content with working 9-5 monday thru friday, having a spouse, 2 kids, a car and a trip to disneyworld. Pizza on friday night, mow the lawn on saturday, watch foot ball on sunday.

And you need those people because otherwise nothing would get done out there in the world.

I don't aspire to that life, but I understand why people do.

And a lot of those people don't want to get out and "experience" all that because often times travel is not fun, not comfortable and not a great learning experience. Which is why people go to resorts.

One thing I remember hearing is that by the time you hit your mid 30's you are looking for comfort. I've seen that transition in myself. Just not interested in staying fleabag hotels and hostels anymore.
You and I seem to agree on a lot, Wanneroo.

Often the fleabag-hotel-backpack people might seem at odds with the resorty-3-huge-pieces-of-luggage people, but there can be overlap.

And as Jackinoff (lol) mentions, there can be just as much conformity among the migrating herd of backpackers hitting the word-of-mouth hotspots, whose travels are supposedly more "authentic" simply because they eschew the comforts of higher end lodging and travel closer to the ground.

Cjseliga, I think it's really cool that you did a presentation for your nephew's class. I really don't want to go to Antarctica, but I definitely would be interested in a power-point show.
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