U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-29-2011, 01:28 PM
 
886 posts, read 1,923,508 times
Reputation: 317

Advertisements

From what I've read, people can just get on and off of them, and the only risk is if they get caught without a ticket.

I've purchased tickets in advance, do people commonly sit in the assigned seats they have or just take a seat anywhere?

Also took a night train from Amsterdam to Prague, and me and my gf got our own room on the train... is there anything certain we need to do to access it? Are we given a key or anything? This is on City Night Line. Just trying to avoid confusion when we do show up =)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-29-2011, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Cottonwood CA
334 posts, read 946,907 times
Reputation: 303
Default Train travel

You may have much more experience than me regarding European train travel. My limited experience was via a 5 day Swiss-Rail Pass. In that case, we boarded the train and selected our seats (not assigned). The conductor came by during the trip and looked at our rail passes. In one or two cases I saw "non-ticketed" people actually pay the conductor directly.

Our only trip leg where the seats were assigned was on a sight-seeing segment of the trip called the Glacier Express.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2011, 01:43 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 6,968,983 times
Reputation: 4061
It depends on the kind of train. Long-distance high speed trains like the Eurostar, Thalys, TGV, ICE, etc. require reservations and riders must sit in the assigned seats printed on the ticket. Slower regional trains usually do not have assigned seats, but often have 1st and 2nd class carriages, so you must sit in the class indicated on your ticket.

It is usually possible to get on a regional train without a ticket (if you're running late, for example), but you need to immediately seek out a worker on the train to purchase your ticket to avoid being fined.

Ticket control varies a lot from train to train and region to region, so some people do get away with never buying a ticket, but of course I would not recommend it.

I've never had my own compartment on a night train, so I don't know whether you're given a key or not. But shared compartments never have locked doors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2011, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 8,274,517 times
Reputation: 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrizzle View Post
From what I've read, people can just get on and off of them, and the only risk is if they get caught without a ticket.

I've purchased tickets in advance, do people commonly sit in the assigned seats they have or just take a seat anywhere?

Also took a night train from Amsterdam to Prague, and me and my gf got our own room on the train... is there anything certain we need to do to access it? Are we given a key or anything? This is on City Night Line. Just trying to avoid confusion when we do show up =)
Most trains insist that you have a ticket before boarding but you are not always checked. If you have assigned seats then you are meant to sit in them, but you can sit where you like in that class providing it's not a seat somebody else has booked.

Never been on that particular night train but generally there's a lock lockable from the inside, same as a toilet cubicle - pretty sure they won't use keys. In my experience you just turn up as normal and find the right compartment - it's not like checking in to a hotel room.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2011, 03:42 PM
 
12,265 posts, read 18,393,933 times
Reputation: 19088
For an overnight train I think you have to present a ticket to board that particular sleeper car and the purser or whoever will show you the cabin.
Otherwise, as stated, they have all sort of trains - intercity, highspeed, direct, etc. I got caught once without a ticket in NL (because I was in the station so early and the manned ticket counters weren't open yet). The Man caught me and just told me to get off the next stop and buy a ticket, which I did. But - it could have been a huge fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2011, 04:15 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
37,964 posts, read 55,708,171 times
Reputation: 89640
More info here: Sleeping car - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Train FAQ's: How To Use Rail Tickets In A European Country from Rail Europe
http://www.mercurynews.com/travel-europe/ci_14795139
Have Prem tickets - question on seating | Europe Forum | Fodor's Travel Talk Forums

Very detailed info about sleeper trains: ( with pictures)
Travelling overnight on Europe's City Night Line sleeper trains...
In a sleeper train you can lock the door from inside but not outside. Don't worry,each wagon has a conductor that keeps an eye on their assigned wagon.

Commuter trains and short distance trains usually do not have assigned seats.
__________________
.
"No Copyrighted Material"
Moderated forums:
World, Europe, Texas, Corpus Christi, El Paso, Lubbock, Tyler, Houston, San Antonio, Tallahassee, Macon, Duluth, Fish, Home Interior Design and Decorating, Science and Technology Forums
.

Need help? Click on this: >>> ToS, Mod List, Rules & FAQ's, Guide, CD Home page, How to Search
Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
8,566 posts, read 9,662,674 times
Reputation: 4228
Verseau, above, has it about right. High speed trains generally will have reservations and seat assignments. Regional trains are seat yourself. Though your location and timing may result in something different.

Boarding a Renfre out of Barcelona, to Madrid, my 'reserved' seat was taken. Pointing this out to the other passenger, he suggested I take just any seat as we would all wind up at the same destination. He was right.

Boarding an overnight Renfre out of Madrid, to Lisbon, the train was packed and it was take any seat you could manage.

On a TGV out of Montpelier, to Geneva, the train started moving just after I stepped on board. It also was full and only one obviously available seat, which I took. Turns out this was in Second Class, my Res was in First Class, traveling on a EuroPass. Turns out well as I was seated at a table for two, across from a young woman from Sete, who showed me a self portrait of her exposed breasts. But only shortly before pulling into Lyon, where she disappeared.

So, attempt to follow the rules as you know them. Be prepared to make adjustments as you go. Don't be late. Probably any conductor or train personnel will be able to assist in English, especially in Amsterdam.

Elnina, thanks for the great links.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2011, 07:50 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,301 posts, read 12,211,814 times
Reputation: 8054
You're stuttering, Elnina!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 06:02 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,909,074 times
Reputation: 13245
If you have a regular ticket rather than a pass or reserved ticket, do not forget to validate it in the orange/yellow machine by the train track. I only know this to be true for Italy and France (haven't seen this in other countries.)
I watched an elderly Italian couple get into a shouting match with the conductor when he fined them for not validating their tickets.

My go-to site for help traveling through Europe is The Man in Seat 61 (as seen in Elina's second link.)

However, I also like to use the Transport section of Eurotrip--she knows her stuff and answers promptly.

Finally, there is Germany's train site, Dbahn, which offers information for all countries in English, and is easy to navigate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2011, 06:03 AM
 
886 posts, read 1,923,508 times
Reputation: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
More info here: Sleeping car - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Train FAQ's: How To Use Rail Tickets In A European Country from Rail Europe
http://www.mercurynews.com/travel-europe/ci_14795139
Have Prem tickets - question on seating | Europe Forum | Fodor's Travel Talk Forums

Very detailed info about sleeper trains: ( with pictures)
Travelling overnight on Europe's City Night Line sleeper trains...
In a sleeper train you can lock the door from inside but not outside. Don't worry,each wagon has a conductor that keeps an eye on their assigned wagon.

Commuter trains and short distance trains usually do not have assigned seats.
Thank you! So it sounds like you do have a key and they direct you to your room.

All the other trains I'm on are ones that are about 2 hour trips and I've purchased seats in advance, so I'll sit where the tickets say.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top