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Old 02-06-2014, 03:42 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,877,253 times
Reputation: 33476

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
99% of Yellowstone is wilderness (not designated, but effective) - no crowds, no signs. Anyone who hangs out at Old Faithful or Mammoth, instead of the 1000+ miles of backcountry trails, the majority of which receive light to very light to extremely light traffic, then complains about the crowds needs to have their head examined.

In 2012 my son and I hiked the Rescue Creek Trail - 8 miles in the backcountry, we encountered one hiking group (the passed us - as they did, we chatted and enjoyed a sighting of a pair of grizzly cubs a 200-300 yards away, scurrying up a tree). Five hours on the trail, maybe 10 minutes of that in the company of others. And Rescue Creek is listed as 'moderate', not even 'light' for traffic. Terrific hike, starting in high meadows and descending to arid semi-desert near the Roosevelt Arch.

If people did more exploring and less whining about the fact that there are other people around, they'd probably enjoy themselves a lot more.
most people make a concerted effort to limit their exploring between the seat of their car and the nearest rest room at the scenic overlooks
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Old 02-06-2014, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
5,147 posts, read 6,337,382 times
Reputation: 1561
Ever read Nevada Barr? She is an author with National Park experience. People take off on hikes with medical conditions that SHOULD keep them close to transportation all the time. And with America's rising occurrence of overweight people who could get a heart attack anytime, that's pretty stupid. People need to learn their limits. Plus, as I'm sure someone has mentioned, our misuse of land has driven us into contact with wild animals who don't even want to be near us. We excite their self-defense reactions, and they attack us without any thought process. Most of the time, I'm convinced it is our fault. As a people, we simply fail to respect wild animals. We have it in our mind that they haven't a right to any territory at all. And of course we kill THEM. All this must be kept in mind when going off into the wild. A human is a very weak creature that acts like a master species. No good can come out of that combination.
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Old 02-07-2014, 07:54 PM
 
14,258 posts, read 23,979,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beenhere4ever View Post
Ever read Nevada Barr? She is an author with National Park experience. People take off on hikes with medical conditions that SHOULD keep them close to transportation all the time. And with America's rising occurrence of overweight people who could get a heart attack anytime, that's pretty stupid. People need to learn their limits.
I am not going to comment on the animal-human interactions since deaths and major injuries RARELY occur.

However, people who get into trouble are generally those who are UNPREPARED for the challenges that they are undertaking - whether they are in good or poor physical condition.

For example, a senior citizen, using a cane, wondering out on the rock cliffs overlooking Lake Superior in MN.

For example, three young people taking a 3 hour hike at Big Bend NP in 90F+ weather in April WITHOUT carrying any water.

For example, parents bringing toddlers on a serious hike up a narrow, steep path to Timpanagos Caves NM in Utah.
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Old 02-08-2014, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
5,147 posts, read 6,337,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I am not going to comment on the animal-human interactions since deaths and major injuries RARELY occur.

However, people who get into trouble are generally those who are UNPREPARED for the challenges that they are undertaking - whether they are in good or poor physical condition.

For example, a senior citizen, using a cane, wondering out on the rock cliffs overlooking Lake Superior in MN.

For example, three young people taking a 3 hour hike at Big Bend NP in 90F+ weather in April WITHOUT carrying any water.

For example, parents bringing toddlers on a serious hike up a narrow, steep path to Timpanagos Caves NM in Utah.
Precisely. Bear attacks are flashy, but mostly people put themselves in situations they aren't physically able to handle. One example is the people buried in avalanches. We all know that avalanches are hazards for which there is little ability to predict (like volcanic eruptions). But adventurous souls just gotta ski, snowboard, or hike on the sides of mountains with deep snow that could let loose any second. I think the possibility of danger might actually lure some people. But once the danger becomes real, then the rest of the world becomes their saviors. And the whole world holds its breath, waiting to see if this bit of adventure is lethal. Never is "bad luck for them" an option.
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:14 AM
 
14,258 posts, read 23,979,216 times
Reputation: 20048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beenhere4ever View Post
Precisely. Bear attacks are flashy, but mostly people put themselves in situations they aren't physically able to handle. One example is the people buried in avalanches. We all know that avalanches are hazards for which there is little ability to predict (like volcanic eruptions). But adventurous souls just gotta ski, snowboard, or hike on the sides of mountains with deep snow that could let loose any second. I think the possibility of danger might actually lure some people. But once the danger becomes real, then the rest of the world becomes their saviors. And the whole world holds its breath, waiting to see if this bit of adventure is lethal. Never is "bad luck for them" an option.

But to address the tone of your other post, it is NOT out of shape people doing things in the national parks that keeps the NPS hopping.

Rather, many of the problems are caused by the inexperienced outdoors people, in good physical condition, who over estimate their abilities.
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Old 02-09-2014, 04:45 PM
 
1,344 posts, read 1,005,962 times
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David Paulidies, a recent guest on Coast to Coast AM has a theory on this subject. All of this is on Youtube if you're interested. Be warned; some of his ideas are a bit far-fetched.
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:16 PM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,754,172 times
Reputation: 4911
Good grief - bring on the fat hate:

Quote:
America's rising occurrence of overweight people who could get a heart attack anytime
I'm fairly confident that 1) the relaxation from sitting by "my" creek and 2) exercise from hiking; are far more beneficial to my health than being tethered to an emergency room.
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Central Indiana/Indy metro area
1,501 posts, read 2,324,074 times
Reputation: 1430
I don't think it is unhealthy people that are a problem when specifically speaking of deaths, but people who fail to prepare for the activity they are doing. Recall the young child that died when mom got her vehicle stuck in the sand in Death Valley. Had water, but not enough. Didn't have a way to contact help. Very recently, three men likely would have died in Great Smoky Mountain National Park had the rangers not hiked in and saved them. They were totally unprepared for the cold weather. They are extremely lucky they were able to use a cell phone in the area. Another story from two or so years ago focused on a group that was hiking in the Grand Canyon if I recall. They actually had the intelligence to buy or rent a personal locator rescue beacon. The problem is, they used it once because they ran out of water. Rescue personnel arrived, provided water and left. These people then used it a day or two later for the same thing. Yes, they actually stayed in the backcountry not having provisions thinking a rescue beacon was something to use to call for supplies when they needed something.
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