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Old 08-16-2012, 03:23 PM
 
11,256 posts, read 43,403,295 times
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Book as early a flight in the day as you possibly can. The cooler air is more stable, leading to less likely turbulence than afternoon flights.

Fear of heights is typically a response to being in a situation where you could possibly fall down a long ways. When seated inside the airplane, the furthest you'll fall is to the floor by your seat. Visually, it's nowhere near as intimidating as looking over a cliff. Get an aisle seat away from the windows so it's difficult to look down except in the cabin area.

Fear of the aircraft sustaining multiple engine failures is not well founded. It's news when they do have a single engine failure, and if they do ... they still have the capacity to fly to the nearest safe airport. The pilots are well trained to deal with the prospect.

Have you checked the stream flows this season? Low water can make for some very different hydraulics in the stream compared to high water and more flow as the rocks get exposed.

Have fun on your trip, Jackson's a neat place.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
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Actually low water will reduce the hydraulics caused by water flow over large rocks or drop offs.
Low water= low hydraulics.
High water gives the water (force) something to work with.

Only during spring run off does this section of river that most of the float trips use, will have rapids that will get you wet.
Most of the time might get a little water spray on you and with low flow the ride will be a tame sight seeing trip.

I've been to this area many times from fishing to climbing the Grand and we'll be by again this fall.
I've fished and floated this stretch of river many times.




Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post

Have you checked the stream flows this season? Low water can make for some very different hydraulics in the stream compared to high water and more flow as the rocks get exposed.

Have fun on your trip, Jackson's a neat place.
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
Actually low water will reduce the hydraulics caused by water flow over large rocks or drop offs.
Low water= low hydraulics.
High water gives the water (force) something to work with.
Yes ... and no.

The dynamics of the flow are entirely different depending upon water depth and cfs flow.

I've been in these areas when the water and flow were both very high. The result was a fast smooth passage because the rock formations were buried way under the surface and whatever turbulence they created was masked by the flow over the top. You could barely tell that there was any interrupted or turbulent flow while floating by on the surface and the paddling was almost not needed for the passage.

Conversely, I've been in these areas when the water level was lower and rock formations now presented obstacles at or near the surface and entirely different flow hydraulics around them. There can be a lot more paddling to make progress downstream and to maneuver the raft around the obstacles.

With the Snake river being classified as having 1-3 level sections, there's plenty of opportunities to get wet unless you're in one of the big barge rafts ... we usually do this in an older 8-person raft, which has no room in it except at the perimeter with the equipment stowed in the center.

Flow right now is 3400 cfs at Jackson, so the river still has a lot of action.

Last edited by sunsprit; 08-17-2012 at 09:26 PM..
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Old 08-18-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
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With that flow you will need to be sitting up front and splash the water with your foot to get wet, even if you were in a inner-tube.
This section of river is very tame, that is why it makes such a good sight seeing trip for those not interested in running rapids.

I've run a lot of rivers and even a armature with no idea would have nothing to be worried about concerning any hydraulics that will drag you under.
A grizz holds a much bigger danger that the hydraulics found on this stretch of river.

We'll we out there again this fall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post

With the Snake river being classified as having 1-3 level sections, there's plenty of opportunities to get wet unless you're in one of the big barge rafts ... we usually do this in an older 8-person raft, which has no room in it except at the perimeter with the equipment stowed in the center.

Flow right now is 3400 cfs at Jackson, so the river still has a lot of action.
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Old 08-18-2012, 12:36 PM
 
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quoting NPS re the Snake river:

Flowing west from its source in the Teton
Wilderness, the Snake River enters
Yellowstone National Park, then flows
south through the John D. Rockefeller, Jr.
Memorial Parkway and into Jackson Lake
in Grand Teton National Park. Regaining
its free-flowing character downstream of
Jackson Lake Dam, the river winds through
the park.
The Snake is a complex river to float. The
beauty and lack of whitewater lulls floaters
into inattentiveness. A tangle of channels
and constant shifting of logjams present
difficulties found on few whitewater rivers.
Accidents are common. Use caution
whenever you float.
Information on flow rates and additional
caution areas are posted at river landings
and visitor centers. Reports are updated
weekly or whenever significant change in
river conditions occur.
Even boaters frequently floating the Snake
should check conditions before every trip, as
the river can change overnight. River flow
varies greatly throughout the summer. Water
depth averages 2 to 3 feet, but exceeds 10
feet in some locations. Boulders and bottom
irregularities cause standing waves up to 3
feet high.
Typically, spring flows will be muddy,
extremely cold, and very high, increasing the
difficulty of all river sections. As snowmelt
diminishes, volume decreases and waters
clear. In spite of reduced flow, the current
stays deceptively strong. Logjams and tight
turns remain. Always set up maneuvers well
in advance and make decisions early. Take
traditionally strong upstream winds into
consideration, especially when canoeing.

Latest Moran Jct flow report at 2300 +/- cfs.
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