U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-29-2012, 02:02 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,677 posts, read 23,252,262 times
Reputation: 48862

Advertisements

My father has never visited Ireland - and I don't know why because he has done quite a bit a traveling. He is in good physical shape and he's sharp as a tack. But he gets cranky easily and would be annoyed if lines were long, or people are inefficient. So we might want to stay in an American Hotel.

He is kind of a typical "mid-century traveler". How ever, he will be annoyed by Americans also if they act without decorum.

I want to make his trip as pleasant as possible for him, and for him to see the sights in the country that have of his ancestors came from.

He is interested in history and places of natural beauty and he likes to talk. An Irish Pub that would be friendly to an older American man would be fun for him.
If there is a day trip involving a boat ride that would be good too, Visiting an Island.

He likes fish and does not eat red meat for health reasons but he still enjoys drink,

Any help would be greatly appreciated. The budget is flexible. Not strict but not "luxury".

Thanks! Sheena
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-29-2012, 02:33 PM
 
Location: SW France
14,253 posts, read 14,142,854 times
Reputation: 27914
If he finds a pub where they are not friendly then I'll be surprised.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2012, 08:39 PM
 
4,800 posts, read 10,580,212 times
Reputation: 8290
We went to Dublin with my 83 year old Dad about 10 years ago. He was also in pretty good shape. There are many interesting landmarks in Dublin itself including Trinity College, which has a very old library that includes the Book of Kells, a very old book. There are numerous cathedrals, including one we visited, St Mary's cathedral parts of which date from the 12th century and St Patrick's cathedral which is quite magnificent on the inside.
You will find many pubs and most are friendly although watch out when there is a soccer match on the TV. Some of the fans can get pretty drunk and rowdy.
Lots of pretty countryside outside Dublin too, with some castles although the castles I saw in Ireland aren't as impressive as the rest of British Isles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,936 posts, read 7,260,520 times
Reputation: 3490
My suggestion is that you visit your local public library, or independent bookseller ... and read through some of the Ireland guidebooks. I have the sense that you'll be more particular, picky than your father.

Here are some of my photos from Ireland, to give you ideas (including for Dublin):

billmastersonireland's photos and albums on webshots
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2012, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,255 posts, read 11,118,694 times
Reputation: 12572
We took my 80-year old aunt to London and Ireland a few years ago and if your father is completely ambulatory you should have a good time. My aunt used a wheelchair and I had to call every location in advance to weed out the places that where inaccessible, didn't have lifts etc. Have a wonderful trip!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2012, 04:49 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,677 posts, read 23,252,262 times
Reputation: 48862
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomexico View Post
My suggestion is that you visit your local public library, or independent bookseller ... and read through some of the Ireland guidebooks. I have the sense that you'll be more particular, picky than your father.

Here are some of my photos from Ireland, to give you ideas (including for Dublin):

billmastersonireland's photos and albums on webshots
Totally doubt that. He's pretty opinionated and picky. Always was but even more so with age, Me picky? When it comes to travel, I can stay about anywhere - I just love going places.

Thanks for the link.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2012, 04:52 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,677 posts, read 23,252,262 times
Reputation: 48862
Thanks for the ideas everyone! What are the best guidebooks in your opinions?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Striving for Avalon
1,424 posts, read 2,092,340 times
Reputation: 3348
I just did this with my 80 year old grandparents.

Step 1: Fly premium economy/business class, which can be had for as little as 1300/2000. Ireland is one of the cheapest gateways into Europe, in terms of flights. Further, the business class experience delights old people. The priority check-in, security, lounge access, and boarding make the nightmare of economy travel into something pleasant/special for the leisure traveller and bearable for the business traveller. The flight attendants dancing attendance bringing champagne, something better than dog food, and a pillow (all in a properly sized seat) help as well.

Step 2: Minimize luggage. You'll thank me.

Step 3: Priceline/hotwire. A 4* or 5* hotel can be downright cheap. We got a palatial 4* room for $100 per night on the weekend in Stephen's Green in July (the Dublin equivalent to Central Park, in that you're surrounded by the city's top hotels, embassies, restaurants, and shopping venues). Hotels are more spacious than most of the rest of Europe.

As for kicking about, the city center is full of pubs more than happy to do anything for a customer. (One of them recommended a hair dresser for grandma!) Understand that they're in a a severe economic downturn, so a friendly tourist who orders a bite and a drink is a godsend. This also goes for anything you might need at any shop, we found.

Prepare to be annoyed by beggars. Being asked for $0.50 for "a beer" is annoying on multiple levels. There's a fair number and make wandering after sunset...unpleasant, though they're mostly harmless.

If you go in summer, try the strawberries with fresh cream. DELICIOUS

Don't bother with renting a car if you stay mostly in the city.

Sheena, honey, travel books are for the past. Print out the wikitravel pages on Dublin. On route to one interesting thing, you will find others (my experience). Dublin travel guide - Wikitravel

If you want an interesting day trip, visit Bru Na Boinne...Ireland's answer to Stonehenge: Brú na Bóinne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia It's about 40 miles north of Dublin. A train will get you from Dublin to Drogheda, the nearest town. From there, it's 2km/1.5 miles by bus (which goes straight to the site's visitor centre), or you can hire your own cab for about 5 EUR/$6.50 for that distance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2012, 08:12 AM
 
Location: American Expat
2,189 posts, read 4,715,756 times
Reputation: 1876
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
My father has never visited Ireland - and I don't know why because he has done quite a bit a traveling. He is in good physical shape and he's sharp as a tack. But he gets cranky easily and would be annoyed if lines were long, or people are inefficient. So we might want to stay in an American Hotel.

He is kind of a typical "mid-century traveler". How ever, he will be annoyed by Americans also if they act without decorum.

I want to make his trip as pleasant as possible for him, and for him to see the sights in the country that have of his ancestors came from.

He is interested in history and places of natural beauty and he likes to talk. An Irish Pub that would be friendly to an older American man would be fun for him.
If there is a day trip involving a boat ride that would be good too, Visiting an Island.

He likes fish and does not eat red meat for health reasons but he still enjoys drink,

Any help would be greatly appreciated. The budget is flexible. Not strict but not "luxury".

Thanks! Sheena

I know this thread is a little old, but...

Ireland is relatively small. So even the largest city ( Dublin ) only has Buses etc. There aren't any subways. I'd recommend that you rent a car, if possible. That way you don't have to wait that long for anything.

I think you're focusing too much on the "American" thing. It's not Africa or Asia. People there are not that different.

I would use priceline to book Hotels. I always got great deals with priceline. You can also look into Hostels. Hostels do have private rooms as well and they are usually a lot cheaper than a Hotel. You'd just have a lot of young people in the Hostels. If he wouldn't feel like an "outsider", I'd recommend booking a Hostel. I've stayed at many Hostels and there are plenty of Hostels that are just like a Hotel.
Good luck


P.S. I don't know why travel books would be a "thing of the past". I certainly do prefer reading a book than reading something on the screen. Even if it's printed out, a book is compact and neat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2012, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,255 posts, read 11,118,694 times
Reputation: 12572
I would NOT recommend driving in Dublin. Pick up your car when your ready to hit the countryside. The rental agencies will bring the car to your hotel. Everything is at a slower pace so don't expect everything to be the way it is here. That 's what travel is all about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top