U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-30-2012, 08:16 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,709 posts, read 28,770,848 times
Reputation: 43837

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
........... but about driving those winding one-lane roads, is there any special etiquette about driving those roads? If you meet other cars and there isn't room for both, does one back up until you find a turnout?
Yes, unless you both prefer to sit there until you die of old age.

Often, there is enough room for some one to ease to the side and park and at slow speeds, one of the cars can squeak by. You will find that there are pull-outs and if you watch ahead, you can see the other car coming and pull off the road until he passes you.

Everyone is quite polite about the whole thing. As far as I could figure it out, the car that had the closest pull-out space was the one to yield. Passing normally involved some polite nodding or a wave and some very nice manners.

If you are going to do it, be very cautious about getting the car wheels off the pavement anywhere that the ground is wet. You don't want to get stuck in the mud way out in the wilds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-30-2012, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,751,312 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Yes, unless you both prefer to sit there until you die of old age.

Often, there is enough room for some one to ease to the side and park and at slow speeds, one of the cars can squeak by. You will find that there are pull-outs and if you watch ahead, you can see the other car coming and pull off the road until he passes you.

Everyone is quite polite about the whole thing. As far as I could figure it out, the car that had the closest pull-out space was the one to yield. Passing normally involved some polite nodding or a wave and some very nice manners.

If you are going to do it, be very cautious about getting the car wheels off the pavement anywhere that the ground is wet. You don't want to get stuck in the mud way out in the wilds.
Single track roads have many designated passing places. This is how to drive on a single track road:
Driving Single Track Roads Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,751,312 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It's been a couple of years since I lived in Scotland, but heat is really expensive and insulation doesn't seem to be very important. Gasoline was 4 times the cost, but I don't know what it would be now.

I found most items in the stores to be the same amount as in the USA, but it was in pounds and not dollars. So a shirt that cost $16 in the USA would be 16 pounds in Scotland. But it costs you $2 to purchase one pound, so effectively, the shirt cost you twice as much.

Groceries are more expensive, especially meat. Items that you know will make your life more comfortable are simply not available, so you do what the Scots do and do without. You get used to being cold all the time because nobody can afford heat. I couldn't stand to be indoors at stores or anyone's house when I first got back to the states. The indoor temperatures were stifling.

You can get year long passes to see castles and ruins, so that ends up being quite cheap. Everybody gardens because you can do that at home and not spend gasoline, so there are lots of beautiful yards to enjoy.
The exchange rate has not been $2 per 1 for about 6 or 7 years. It's now about $1.60/1.

Some groceries cost more but our fruit and veg is generally much cheaper than the US. And a rule I would not say items that are $16 in the US are 16 here. I pay 7.99 monthly fee for Audible UK and in the US it costs $14.95.

What items do you think are not available in Scotland that you can get in the US? I can't think of anything I'm missing.

My home is kept very warm. Friends with huge old victorian houses are cold, but otherwise, no problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2012, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,751,312 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Social Democrat View Post
Hi Ameriscot:
I hope you don't mind my troubling you for a bit of information (and hopefully the moderator is ok with this) about living in Scotland.
I've been to Edinburgh several times and absolutely love it there. I'm retiring early next year and my wife has expressed an interest in moving over there - yikes! Actually, I (we) have been considering such a move for many years.
My question is very basic: aside from the intial purchase of a house (our budget is about $300K US) what is an estimated, realistic COL per month?
I know cars are a bit more expensive there but we only need one. Utilities (and petrol) most likely are higher but things like food, property taxes etc. concern me. We wouldn't necessarily want to live directly in Edinburgh but would want to be within 15 or so miles of there.
Many thanks for any information, or direction to good sources would be vey much appreciated.
Hope you are having a bonny day!
I don't know if you still want the answers or found them elsewhere, but the most important is what visa are you entitled to? The UK is just as strict about immigration as the US. Unless you are wealthy, what you'd need to retire here would be a parent who was born in the UK - either you or spouse. Or if you want to sneak in through Ireland, an Irish born grandparent.

As for $300K for a house in Edinburgh. Forget it. That's less than 190K. You could get a decent flat in a decent neighbourhood, but nothing posh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2012, 12:10 PM
 
1,014 posts, read 1,268,077 times
Reputation: 1370
Thank you for the reply Ameriscot. I did some searching on the UK site and found some info that along with yours enlightened me quite a bit.
The Visa part is the main barrier. We aren't "wealthy" but can support ourselves easily...sigh. Anyway, we may just look at renting there for part of a year which would allow us to do the same in Ireland, Paris etc. so not all bad.
Reading about negotiating single path roads there reminded me of some humorous encounters on such roads there when I last visited and rented a car. A few times when encountering another car I would pull over and the other car would stop. They stopped either to just say hello or ask directions and the look on their faces was always so priceless when I spoke - I look like a native Scot so they were shocked at the American accent!
Thanks again for your response and we look forward to our next visit there!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,751,312 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Social Democrat View Post
Thank you for the reply Ameriscot. I did some searching on the UK site and found some info that along with yours enlightened me quite a bit.
The Visa part is the main barrier. We aren't "wealthy" but can support ourselves easily...sigh. Anyway, we may just look at renting there for part of a year which would allow us to do the same in Ireland, Paris etc. so not all bad.
Reading about negotiating single path roads there reminded me of some humorous encounters on such roads there when I last visited and rented a car. A few times when encountering another car I would pull over and the other car would stop. They stopped either to just say hello or ask directions and the look on their faces was always so priceless when I spoke - I look like a native Scot so they were shocked at the American accent!
Thanks again for your response and we look forward to our next visit there!
I can always tell Americans on single track roads because they pull into a passing place to the right, instead of left. If the passing place is on your right you just pull up and stop next to it and the oncoming car pulls into the passing place. Americans also forget about driving on the left when they are in car parks!

You can live here on a visitor visa I think for 6 months a year if you can prove you can support yourself.

I'm here by marriage but not an option for you two!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-30-2012, 01:25 PM
 
1,014 posts, read 1,268,077 times
Reputation: 1370
I forgot - the first couple of times I did pull into the passing place on the right until a kindly Scot told me to stay left and they will take the passing spot. I learned very quickly to mind which side I was on after almost having a fender bender in parking lot because the other driver wasn't looking for me to be on their side! Geez, I forgot that and am very happy you mentioned it as we will be visiting there next fall. Having your own wheels there really pays off as we love meandering around in no particular hurry.
Yeah, the marriage thing won't work - my wife is Chinese and has no UK heritage. We should be able to satisfy the requirement to stay for up to six months there so again your help is so much appreciated!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2012, 04:02 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,751,312 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Social Democrat View Post
I forgot - the first couple of times I did pull into the passing place on the right until a kindly Scot told me to stay left and they will take the passing spot. I learned very quickly to mind which side I was on after almost having a fender bender in parking lot because the other driver wasn't looking for me to be on their side! Geez, I forgot that and am very happy you mentioned it as we will be visiting there next fall. Having your own wheels there really pays off as we love meandering around in no particular hurry.
Yeah, the marriage thing won't work - my wife is Chinese and has no UK heritage. We should be able to satisfy the requirement to stay for up to six months there so again your help is so much appreciated!
I don't mind driving on single track roads, but the problem is that you can't really enjoy the scenery that way as you always have to keep an eye out. Except for the islands though you can often avoid single track roads.

Check out the UK Home Office immigration site to find out about visas, but I'm fairly sure you can still get a 6 month visa if you prove you've got the money. I don't know what you do about health care though as I doubt a visitor would entitled to NHS care at no charge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Striving for Avalon
1,424 posts, read 2,093,655 times
Reputation: 3348
As a graduate of St Andrews, I need to recommend St Andrews at a day-trip. The boutique hotels offer excellent high teas. One can enjoy a walk on the beach (a filming location for [i]Chariots of Fire[i]), have a look at the now 600 year old university (very Hogwarts-esque to Americans), have a nice lunch, go shopping, relax etc. Oh, and then there is the allure of being the Mecca of the golfing world.

St Andrews is easily reachable by train or bus from Edinburgh, though I'd recommend the train to Leuchars (nearest station) and then a taxi (10) onwards to St Andrews. If you are ambitious, you could even combine St Andrews and Dundee in one visit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2012, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,751,312 times
Reputation: 3272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amelorn View Post
As a graduate of St Andrews, I need to recommend St Andrews at a day-trip. The boutique hotels offer excellent high teas. One can enjoy a walk on the beach (a filming location for [i]Chariots of Fire[i]), have a look at the now 600 year old university (very Hogwarts-esque to Americans), have a nice lunch, go shopping, relax etc. Oh, and then there is the allure of being the Mecca of the golfing world.

St Andrews is easily reachable by train or bus from Edinburgh, though I'd recommend the train to Leuchars (nearest station) and then a taxi (10) onwards to St Andrews. If you are ambitious, you could even combine St Andrews and Dundee in one visit.
St Andrews is nice. Took a day trip there with my son as he wanted to see the golf course and get his pic taken on the 18th hole.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Travel
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top