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Old 05-27-2014, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,454,113 times
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I'm currently in transit to Delhi, where I look forward to grazing around Chandni Chowk, a street market that seems to have a great deal of people cooking a variety of foods that sell for just a few cents each. There are entire tour groups dedicated to pointing out interesting food and drinks to visitors there, so it must be a delight. I've been looking at what sit-down restaurants cost and they are several times more expensive, at least the ones that have a web page.

Like jtur88 said, if there's a market, I would much prefer to eat there as it is cost effective and just as satisfying as a restaurant.
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Old 05-27-2014, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,411 posts, read 26,269,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
I'm currently in transit to Delhi, where I look forward to grazing around Chandni Chowk, a street market that seems to have a great deal of people cooking a variety of foods that sell for just a few cents each. There are entire tour groups dedicated to pointing out interesting food and drinks to visitors there, so it must be a delight. I've been looking at what sit-down restaurants cost and they are several times more expensive, at least the ones that have a web page.

Like jtur88 said, if there's a market, I would much prefer to eat there as it is cost effective and just as satisfying as a restaurant.
Careful in India, that's the epitome of unsanitary. Make sure you get advice on where to eat and where not to eat or you could wind up quite sick. A mid-priced sit down restaurant will likely only cost you 10 bucks and possibly save your stomach. If you're going to eat street food and food from outdoor vendors, get advice on which ones are good and which ones arent.
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Old 05-27-2014, 12:59 PM
 
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We have survived two trips to India without getting sick and we did not eat the street food. I'll be frank and say it was not only because of sanitary concerns but because most of it didn't look appealing. Heavy, greasy and deep fried food doesn't appeal to us. If you must eat the street food, look for the stalls that are busy with a long queue, as that suggests a proven reputation. You may want to sign up for one of the tours as they will know which stall to eat from and which to avoid. If you don't want to pay for a tour, only order freshly fried food that are just out of the fryer and haven't been sitting around for some time.

Midrange restaurants in India are dirt cheap. You can eat well for only $5 in a midrange restaurant.

As a side note, we have happily eaten in street markets in Thailand, Vietnam and Malaysia. But not in India. India is filthy to a degree that the other countries aren't. I loved India but I cannot understate how dirty India can be.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
I'm currently in transit to Delhi, where I look forward to grazing around Chandni Chowk, a street market that seems to have a great deal of people cooking a variety of foods that sell for just a few cents each. There are entire tour groups dedicated to pointing out interesting food and drinks to visitors there, so it must be a delight. I've been looking at what sit-down restaurants cost and they are several times more expensive, at least the ones that have a web page.

Like jtur88 said, if there's a market, I would much prefer to eat there as it is cost effective and just as satisfying as a restaurant.
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Old 05-27-2014, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Kanada 🍁
120,082 posts, read 14,315,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
We have survived two trips to India without getting sick and we did not eat the street food. I'll be frank and say it was not only because of sanitary concerns but because most of it didn't look appealing. Heavy, greasy and deep fried food doesn't appeal to us. If you must eat the street food, look for the stalls that are actively busy with a long queue, as that suggests a proven reputation. You may want to sign up for one of the tours as they will know which stall to eat from and which to avoid. If you don't want to pay for a tour, only order freshly fried food that are just out of the fryer and haven't been sitting around for some time.

Midrange restaurants in India are dirt cheap. You can eat well for only $5 in a midrange restaurant.

As a side note, we have happily eaten in street markets in Thailand, Vietnam and Malaysia. But not in India. India is filthy to a degree that the other countries aren't. I loved India but I cannot understate how dirty India can be.
We have traveled a few times to India and ate at small establishments like the Dabba and the food was awesome. One time we traveled in the Himalaya area and ate in a tent,again outstanding food. I must say we did take DUKORAL in case of stomach problems. We never got sick. It helped that DH grew up in India and knew where to travel,eat and what to avoid.
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Old 05-30-2014, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,356,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
Careful in India, that's the epitome of unsanitary. Make sure you get advice on where to eat and where not to eat or you could wind up quite sick. A mid-priced sit down restaurant will likely only cost you 10 bucks and possibly save your stomach. If you're going to eat street food and food from outdoor vendors, get advice on which ones are good and which ones arent.
There are probably ten thousand street and market vendors in a city like Delhi. Who would you trust to tell you which ones are serving safe food and which ones aren't?

I doubt if I've ever paid ten bucks for a meal in my life, even in the USA.
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Old 06-28-2014, 06:44 PM
JL JL started this thread
 
7,355 posts, read 11,899,895 times
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Check this out....street food on wheels in order to get away from the cops in a rich district of HCMC...a bowl of rice vermicelli beef soup for 75 cents...you can't beat that!! No Siree!

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Old 06-28-2014, 07:19 PM
 
2,563 posts, read 2,797,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I agree in theory. It's adventurous, it smells good, do what the locals do... But keep in mind readers - health and cleanliness standards are not in place in some developing countries. You don't know that meat has been out in the hot sun for two days, or the vegetables have been rinsed in the local sewer water, or that the chicken is not really chicken but someones former pet.
Next thing you know, the rest of your vacation is spent on your knees in front of the porcelean God.
Actually, the conventional wisdom seems to be that you stand the least chance of getting sick by eating in an open air market where they cook the food fresh right in front of you. More often than not, you get sick in a restaurant where they keep the food in the back room for Lord knows how long.
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Old 06-28-2014, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,358,037 times
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McDonalds is in almost every country, although the menus are sometimes in the local language. However, I think no matter where you'll go, they'll understand "Big Mac with Fries". If not, raise your voice or go to Burger King. Some countries have American chains, like Applebees, TGI Friday, and Chili's. The hotel buffets are usually a good source of nutrition, as long as it is a chain you can find in the US (Best Western, Hilton, Holiday Inn, etc.).

Whatever you do, DO NOT go local, unless given a very specific reference by your travel agency. Other countries have lower food hygiene standards, and doing so could be ruin your trip or even your life!!!
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Old 06-29-2014, 05:21 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,651,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graceC View Post
I've eaten good food in Pike Place Market - Seattle, Reading Terminal Market - Philadelphia, French Quarter - New Orleans, Granville Island Market (this one is in Vancouver Canada), excellent fried chicken in Lexington Market - Baltimore, to name a few. They do exist in the US, although mostly in big cities.

Back to original question, most of the best dishes I've had when traveling were eaten at hole in a wall places that I found by following the locals. Trip Advisor and other popular travel sites are not that useful to me since most of the places listed are typical overpriced tourist spots that won't interest me.
Oxbow in Napa is another for your list.
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Old 06-29-2014, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,688 posts, read 16,130,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Whatever you do, DO NOT go local, unless given a very specific reference by your travel agency. Other countries have lower food hygiene standards, and doing so could be ruin your trip or even your life!!!
You mean Wetherspoons Pub (hundreds of locations across the UK) was lying to me about 'highest possible food safety grades' on their menu. While I'll gladly hit a Starbucks abroad for the free wifi and a frappacino, I couldn't imagine going overseas and then eating only at American chain restaurants.

Though speaking of chain pubs, we ended up at them a good amount in the UK- around six pounds for a decent burger/chicken sandwich, fries, and either a soft drink or beer, VAT included. And since you don't tip in places where you order at the bar, it ends up being about the same price as a similar meal at a chain restaurant in the USA.
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