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Old 05-22-2014, 10:33 PM
 
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I drive across the USA about once a year and it seems like I need to pay about $110 on average to get something that doesn't seem funky and has a decent TV and internet. This usually ends up being a Hampton Inn. I can dip down to $65 which is something like a Red Roof or Super 8 but they are hit or miss, usually bad TV and wifi and generally have at least one gross aspect. The cheapest but nice places are in South Dakota where I've always been able to find a decent place for $39. However, I'd rather not drive across South Dakota.
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Old 05-23-2014, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,681 posts, read 16,103,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Which in many cases should be taken with a grain of salt. Some people equate "cheap" with "best."

Given user ratings, the Drury Inn in Orlando is the #1 property in the area. Uh, not.
My take on the reviews is that people do grade on a curve based on expectations for that hotel class. Drury seems to be a well-run mid-sized chain and the times I've stayed in one, they've punched above their midlevel business hotel type at a reasonable price and have been a great value for what you get from them. Not the Ritz, but some Drury properties can be decidedly better than their Hampton Inn/Courtyard peers.
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Old 05-23-2014, 07:08 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,595,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
My take on the reviews is that people do grade on a curve based on expectations for that hotel class. Drury seems to be a well-run mid-sized chain and the times I've stayed in one, they've punched above their midlevel business hotel type at a reasonable price and have been a great value for what you get from them. Not the Ritz, but some Drury properties can be decidedly better than their Hampton Inn/Courtyard peers.
The point is that they are not the best hotel in the Orlando area (I'd probably give the Peabody--which is far from the most expensive--the nod for overall best taking everything from location to services to decor to cleanliness to comfort into account) regardless of price point.

I grade on a curve depending on the hotel class, but price is not (and shouldn't be) a factor. For example I wouldn't "ding" a Hampton Inn for not having a bellman to assist with luggage--it's not expected that they would. However I do expect a Hilton to provide that service. I wouldn't expect the Hilton to have a scale and rug (not bathmat) in the bathroom, but would expect that from the Ritz Carlton.

The one thing I expect from all is cleanliness, and I will massively deduct for dust, candy wrappers under the bed, a dirty washcloth in the corner of the bathroom, hair of any type in the tub, excessive wear and tear--for example a bit of "pilling" on a bedspread is OK, but a noticeable tear or hole is not, a scuff mark on a sofa is OK, but a stain larger than a dime is not.

I also take away if they offer a free continental breakfast but don't offer any proteins. (Even boiled eggs or Greek yogurts would be acceptable, it doesn't need to be a full spread.) That's a big pet peeve of mine.

Another pet peeve is if they don't recognize my status and fail to deliver amenities or upgrades I am entitled to. I get it if the club level lounge is down for rehab, and they need to offer me breakfast in the restaurant or extra points instead, but if I check in and they don't give me the lounge access I am entitled to with my status with no explanation, that's just careless and I will both mention it in my review and complain to corporate.

Last edited by annerk; 05-23-2014 at 07:19 AM..
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Old 05-23-2014, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,699 posts, read 8,483,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
There are a quite a few properties with a 3-3.5* rating on Trip Advisor in the Houston Metro area that can be had for under $50 most nights using Priceline or Hotwire. Most of them are properties like LaQuintas, Super 8s, Comfort Inns, Marriott Courtyards and the like. For the size of the area, Houston is generally one of the cheapest places to find hotel rooms.

And most of those rooms will blow away most of the B&Bs.
I don't agree. I don't see prices that low, at least not with decent ratings. Also, with a B & B, you get a smaller property and more individualized service that you don't get with the giant, impersonal hotel chains. I've had B & Bs bend the rules a little for me when hotels wouldn't (late checkouts, discounts). I also enjoy speaking with the B & B owners themselves. They often have a lot of wonderful information to share about the city I am visiting and give me great ideas on little known tourist attractions. I have also discovered in my travels that the third party travel sites often don't give customers the best prices. I do better working directly with the hotel or B & B itself, and refunds are less of a hassle.
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Old 05-23-2014, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
15,070 posts, read 19,013,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Where do you find hotels with rooms that cheap? We have done several road trips through Washington, Oregon and California the last few months and never paid less than $95. About the same (US funds) up in Canada. Super 8 is even more like $80, though they are a bit below our standards. We stayed at La Quinta in CA and it was $110.
Rates at these type of hotels decrease when you book in advance (don't do walk ins), use a discount card like AAA or AARP, select locations that are near interstate highways rather than in downtown areas, and travel off season or shoulder season.

We rarely pay more than $70/night includes taxes for a La Quinta or a Red Roof Inn. And those are our one-night-stop preferences on road trips or longer trips when we travel with the dog. No additional fees for allowing pets, and I appreciate that, so we do try to support those two chains.
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Old 05-23-2014, 10:54 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,569 posts, read 39,952,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Your opinion. The idea of staying in a private home with who knows what type of cleanliness standards, ,,, I'd rather stay home.
Ha Ha an expected response from our 'first class' EXPERT traveler who is commenting on a "median price" thread

Such blatant and uninformed misconceptions...In well over 500 stays in guesthomes, no shared rooms / partitions / mattresses floors... I have had ONE lumpy bed (Maine dairyfarm with very cute room and silently falling snow). It was worth it... None of the places were dirty, very very few with shared bath. On the other hand, QUITE a few who let us have their entire house for up to a week since they were gone traveling. Many of these folks we have never met. They just left the keys for us. (That might alarm you, but not me, we never even had a key for our house, and never needed one). Several fancy beach and city homes enjoyed SOLO for $10. night, with the blessing "feel free to use anything you want, come back anytime... bring some friends!".

You can have all my First Class places (2,000 SF on 37th story tonight overlooking Bay of Thailand, been here for 2 months), I would rather be in a guest home staying in a village with the locals (yes we all smell and are sometimes (often) sweaty and the kids might not even wear diapers). - Each to their own, thank goodness... (too bad some people don't respect that others have a valid position). We've all ENDURED that type of person...
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Old 05-23-2014, 12:43 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,595,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Ha Ha an expected response from our 'first class' EXPERT traveler who is commenting on a "median price" thread

Such blatant and uninformed misconceptions...In well over 500 stays in guesthomes, no shared rooms / partitions / mattresses floors... I have had ONE lumpy bed (Maine dairyfarm with very cute room and silently falling snow). It was worth it... None of the places were dirty, very very few with shared bath. On the other hand, QUITE a few who let us have their entire house for up to a week since they were gone traveling. Many of these folks we have never met. They just left the keys for us. (That might alarm you, but not me, we never even had a key for our house, and never needed one). Several fancy beach and city homes enjoyed SOLO for $10. night, with the blessing "feel free to use anything you want, come back anytime... bring some friends!".

You can have all my First Class places (2,000 SF on 37th story tonight overlooking Bay of Thailand, been here for 2 months), I would rather be in a guest home staying in a village with the locals (yes we all smell and are sometimes (often) sweaty and the kids might not even wear diapers). - Each to their own, thank goodness... (too bad some people don't respect that others have a valid position). We've all ENDURED that type of person...
You say places are always clean yet kids roam around without diapers? That's a cesspool, and perhaps you don't mind sleeping in one, but I sure do. I like to think I'm a bit more evolved than that.
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Old 05-23-2014, 01:21 PM
 
35,324 posts, read 25,177,423 times
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Nope, we're all the same amount of evolved. The adults and toddlers in Cambodia, Japan, France and the U.S. are the same level of evolution. Our superficial (and rather insignificant and shallow) cultural customs vary, but that's just about it other than language. People are people.
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Old 05-23-2014, 02:11 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,595,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Nope, we're all the same amount of evolved. The adults and toddlers in Cambodia, Japan, France and the U.S. are the same level of evolution. Our superficial (and rather insignificant and shallow) cultural customs vary, but that's just about it other than language. People are people.
So you think it's acceptable to allow feces to be left anywhere around a home? Ugh. It's no wonder I wouldn't participate in a homestay program if people think it's OK to live like that.
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