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Old 05-30-2014, 02:10 PM
 
Location: SW MO
659 posts, read 1,004,528 times
Reputation: 673

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaIceman View Post

Interesting thing is, while we were dating I used to drive all the time. It was only after she became pregnant with our first child that her carsickness became much worse. Dang kids screw up everything...
My wife used to drive much more than she does now because we had a kid. We used to split the driving much more but now she insists on sitting in the back seat next to our daughter and having me drive.
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Old 05-30-2014, 02:11 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,613,838 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyover_Country View Post
There are at least a few reasons for most mechanics being men. Number one, being a mechanic can be physically difficult especially if you are working on heavy equipment. Men are generally quite a bit larger and significantly stronger than women which can be a definite asset in that line of work. Women can certainly be mechanics but it is relatively harder for them to do so and thus fewer do it. (The ones that are in that field anyway are generally excellent because they do have to work relatively harder and are much more likely to be doing it because they really wanted to do so.) For example, I am a big car nut and have tried on multiple occasions to teach my wife a few basic things after she had asked me to explain them to her, such as how to change a tire. She is a very average-sized lady, so in other words seven inches shorter than me, 60 pounds lighter, and can lift approximately 1/3 to 2/5 of what I can. It is physically difficult for her to take a lug wrench and loosen a somewhat sticky lug nut when changing a tire, plus picking up a tire on a wheel weighing more than half of what she does is very difficult as well. I can do the same job easily. Her changing a pickup tire would be like me using my two foot 1/2" cheater bar to remove the back wheel off of an old Ford 8N and then move it around by myself. Could I do it? Yes, but it is tough compared to getting an impact wrench and a buddy to help.

There is some discouragement of women from "getting their hands dirty" but I do see this changing. Fathers my age are much more likely to take their daughters with them doing "guy stuff" than their wives' fathers were. We'd hope to be able to expose them to the things we like so that we can have more shared interests in the future. I know I will be in that boat as I fully intend to take my daughter out to the shop (and the field, the pond, the trail, and the range) when she gets old enough to be there. My wife actually encourages me to do this because she wishes her dad would have done that with her when she was younger.

There are also repeatedly demonstrated differences between men and women in general likelihood of having aptitude in a certain field. Note that the studies nearly always have a disclaimer that these are general trends and any particular person can be considerably different than "predicted." In my experience the disclaimer is very valid when dealing with individuals and the studies are really only good for explaining general trends such as the one we're discussing. Women as a group tend to be relatively more skilled in verbal and interpersonal tasks than men as a group. Men tend to do better in analytical and spatial tasks. Mechanical skills are very heavy in the spatial and analytical areas and not so much verbal or interpersonal. Women thus are less likely in general to be interested in being a mechanic because of that. But like I said, you have to take every person as an individual. There are excellent female mechanics and construction workers just as there are excellent male daycare workers and kindergarten teachers.
Maybe she needs to work out a little more if lifting a tire or using a lug wrench is so difficult.
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Old 05-30-2014, 02:42 PM
 
Location: SW MO
659 posts, read 1,004,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Maybe she needs to work out a little more if lifting a tire or using a lug wrench is so difficult.
She's 5 foot 3 and weighs 115 pounds so she's not very big. The 120 F winter-to-summer temp swings around here get lug nuts pretty darned tight in the 10,000 miles between tire rotations and they are tough to get off if you are trying to remove them with only a foot-long standard lug wrench. I've stood on the end of the wrench and not been able to budge some of them until I'd really reefed on the end of the wrench and exerted well over my weight in force. I don't think a woman of her size could realistically be expected to develop that kind of force and she is actually in pretty good physical shape.
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Old 05-30-2014, 05:21 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,613,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyover_Country View Post
She's 5 foot 3 and weighs 115 pounds so she's not very big. The 120 F winter-to-summer temp swings around here get lug nuts pretty darned tight in the 10,000 miles between tire rotations and they are tough to get off if you are trying to remove them with only a foot-long standard lug wrench. I've stood on the end of the wrench and not been able to budge some of them until I'd really reefed on the end of the wrench and exerted well over my weight in force. I don't think a woman of her size could realistically be expected to develop that kind of force and she is actually in pretty good physical shape.
I don't weigh much more and can bench press my own weight. Now what were you saying?
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Old 05-30-2014, 05:25 PM
 
Location: SW MO
659 posts, read 1,004,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I don't weigh much more and can bench press my own weight. Now what were you saying?
Bench pressing is considerably different than doing what's essentially a curl. And are you female? If you're a man, duh, you should be able to bench press considerably more than your weight unless you are morbidly obese.
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Old 05-31-2014, 06:05 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,613,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyover_Country View Post
Bench pressing is considerably different than doing what's essentially a curl. And are you female? If you're a man, duh, you should be able to bench press considerably more than your weight unless you are morbidly obese.
I am female. I use 60 pound free weights and 70-80 pound machine weights (depending on the machine) for curls. Like I said, she needs to work out more. I'm 5'6" and weigh 123. I qualify for AARP. Now what were you saying?
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Old 06-01-2014, 08:11 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 54,002,251 times
Reputation: 10530
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I am female. I use 60 pound free weights and 70-80 pound machine weights (depending on the machine) for curls. Like I said, she needs to work out more. I'm 5'6" and weigh 123. I qualify for AARP. Now what were you saying?
It isn't the weight as much as the shape/size of the tire. I can certainly lift WAY more than a tire weighs, but if the tire is large, say for an SUV, getting it out of the trunk is difficult because of how you have to lift--not how much you have to lift. Lifting in a gym is easy, doing it in real life, not so much....and I can lift WAY more than 60 lbs in free weights...
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Old 06-01-2014, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ottawa Valley & Dunedin FL
1,409 posts, read 2,355,691 times
Reputation: 1159
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadtrip75 View Post
Y...
Two reasons:

1. Driving is a leadership position, and men have evolved to take leadership roles more than women have.
2. Automobiles are mechanical devices and men are better at and more interested in mechanics than women are.

It's not a surprising pattern if you believe in evolution.
Geesh! I will concede the second point, slightly. But the first one, ha! I, who am forced to be the passenger on road trips, do all the navigating, and also the research beforehand to plan the route. If that's not leadership, I don't know what is. Upon reflection, perhaps that's the real reason why my husband likes to drive--it leaves me free to make sure we get where we've planned to go.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohky0815 View Post
Hubby drives because he is the head of our household.
You are joking, right?
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Old 06-01-2014, 10:56 AM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,613,838 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
It isn't the weight as much as the shape/size of the tire. I can certainly lift WAY more than a tire weighs, but if the tire is large, say for an SUV, getting it out of the trunk is difficult because of how you have to lift--not how much you have to lift. Lifting in a gym is easy, doing it in real life, not so much....and I can lift WAY more than 60 lbs in free weights...
First of all, I didn't say lift, I said curl. Big difference. I can do more than 60 in lifts.

Next, unless you are under 5' or talking about a tire for a bus, you should be able to handle an SUV tire the same as any other. You aren't technically lifting the tire, you are sliding it.
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:35 PM
 
Location: SW MO
659 posts, read 1,004,528 times
Reputation: 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
First of all, I didn't say lift, I said curl. Big difference. I can do more than 60 in lifts.

Next, unless you are under 5' or talking about a tire for a bus, you should be able to handle an SUV tire the same as any other. You aren't technically lifting the tire, you are sliding it.
You have to get it on and off of the studs. You can usually slide it off but you certainly have to lift it back on and align the stud holes with the studs. You'd need to be able to lift the tire to do that.
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