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Old 06-01-2014, 03:28 PM
 
556 posts, read 762,258 times
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RDU also has international and domestic departures (and arrivals) in the same terminal. They only have a handful of international flights, so no way they could sustain a separate international terminal. Arrivals gate have to have a secure pathway to customs and immigration, but can still be in the same terminal.
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,038 posts, read 45,045,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
Good old days. Pre 9-11. Remember when your family could meet you at the gate? And international departures could be in the same terminal as domestic departures? I can see how the scenario could happen.

Would be impossible these days. You cannot take an international flight without going through US customs and as such you need a valid passport just to leave the US. Most if not all airports now bundle the international flights in the same terminal and your passport is checked before you're allowed to enter the terminal for homeland security reasons.
Good point - I didn't think of the fact that it was pre-9/11, so things may be different even going to Costa Rica now!
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:52 AM
 
12,300 posts, read 18,421,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
Good old days. Pre 9-11. Remember when your family could meet you at the gate? And international departures could be in the same terminal as domestic departures? I can see how the scenario could happen.

Would be impossible these days. You cannot take an international flight without going through US customs and as such you need a valid passport just to leave the US. Most if not all airports now bundle the international flights in the same terminal and your passport is checked before you're allowed to enter the terminal for homeland security reasons.
You don't go through US customs on departing for an international flight, and Homeland security/TSA does not check your passport, just a valid ID like drivers license.
It's the airline themselves that check your passport and visa, and they do indeed check and won't let you into the airplane without one. They do this check usually at the gate. Passports are one thing, however I half wonder however if the visa check process is effective. I've had the airlines page through my passport to find the right visa's...Brazil, this one? China, this one? I had to show the airline staff what an India visa looked like.
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Old 06-02-2014, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,106 posts, read 24,898,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
I would say you would have to be a dumbass not to research whether you needed a visa to travel there in the first place. And even more of a dumbass for not applying before you tried to leave.
Ditto
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Old 06-02-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
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IDK been to different countries long before 9/11 and the check in at airport always asked to see my passport. Some people must be flying Donald Duck airlines if they flew out of the country with out a passport
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Old 06-04-2014, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,595 posts, read 11,085,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssww View Post
If you are deported for this reason, does it have the consequence of your never being allowed entry to that country ever again?
If you're turned around, you've actually never been admitted, so it's not really a "deportation". Probably won't show at all.

Airlines will usually do everything they can to avoid a turn around. Not only do they have to pay for your flight back, there's usually a pretty good fine to the airline on top of that. Turn-arounds from Canada used to be in the $20-30K range, of course that was pre-911, so I have no idea what it is now.
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Old 06-04-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssww View Post
Suppose you forgot to apply for entry visa to a country (or maybe you though you didn't need it), and you took a flight and got off the plane in that country. Maybe you realized during the flight or upon arrival that you should have applied for visa. What will happen? Is it possible they'll process a quick visa after you provide enough documents and maybe pay a hefty fee? Or will you ask you to take a flight back to where you came from?---in which case, will you have to pay the airfare for the return trip? Just curious.
The airline isn't supposed to let you on the plane without the required passport/visa.
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Old 06-04-2014, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
304 posts, read 857,870 times
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I was definitely checked for my passport and visa from Washington to Beijing at check-in and again at the gate, but recall only being checked for passport at check-in for a recent flight from Chicago to Tokyo (no visa needed for Japan), not at the gate.

And as others have stated, there are still a number of airports with mixed domestic/international flights in the same terminal: IAD, IAH, DEN, ORD, etc...
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Old 06-07-2014, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,256,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
A friend of ours flew to Italy on an expired passport (one week expired!). She forgot about the approaching renewal deadline.

When she arrived in Italy the customs saw that her passport was past the expiration date and refused to let her into the country, even though she was a regular traveler to Italy. She had to wait at the airport until a seat was found for her on a returning flight, and yes, it was the airline that had to carry the cost. Apparently the airline was forced to hold back the next plane back to the US until a seat was found for her.

She was completely embarrassed by the whole procedure.

I have heard stories from other travelers, usually young backpackers, who took the risk and went to smaller, remote countries without the appropriate visas and were able to get a visa at the airport/border crossing. This includes Syria (pre civil war), Burma and various Central Asian countries. The success of this method probably depends on having the right customs officer in the right place at the right time, so it should never be attempted unless you're a risk taker and willing to wait a long time.
Dunno about US passports, but many countries won't even let you in if your passport will expire within 6 months...
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Old 06-07-2014, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,256,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Usually, the airline is responsible if they board you without proper documentation. Also, you are then likely to be deported on the next flight out, which has happened to a friend of mine. In her case, she complained to the airline, which made good for restitution of all expenses incurred. She arrived in Chile without a visa, and was immediately escorted to the gate for a flight to Buenos Aires.

I think it is rare, but having a visa is no guarantee that you will be admitted to the country. The visa simply means you have been pre-cleared, but it is still the discretion of the immigration officer to admit you. Presumably, the reverse is also true, and an immigration officer has the discretion to admit a traveler who does not have a required visa.
That is possible whether a visa is required or not. But yeah, you would only be refused entry if they they had good reason to be suspicion something was not right.

Don't know about the reverse. Might depend on the country's immigration policy (perhaps also how corrupt they are).
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