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Old 06-02-2014, 10:39 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,492 posts, read 2,877,828 times
Reputation: 4006

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
At 30,000 feet, the air temperature outside the plane is probably below zero, which is why tropical mountaintops are snow-capped all year. By your logic, if you didn't let in the sunlight, the passengers would freeze to death.
But an airplane should be airtight. None of that is getting in.

It's like how astronauts in outer space need an air conditioning unit within their suits even though it's cold out there.... the suits bottle in the air, but also keep heat from escaping at the same time.

 
Old 06-02-2014, 10:41 PM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,994,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
At 30,000 feet, the air temperature outside the plane is probably below zero, which is why tropical mountaintops are snow-capped all year. By your logic, if you didn't let in the sunlight, the passengers would freeze to death.
lol! You're the second person who has posted something similar.
What tropical mountaintop is @ 30,000 feet?
 
Old 06-02-2014, 10:57 PM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
17,925 posts, read 18,248,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyonpa View Post
Was his right to do...
Correct. I would much rather look out the window than some DUMB video or really anything in some airplane. Sorry, but he was in the right all the way. I always look out the window no matter what unless the sun in totally in my face. I have seen ships and sailboats in the middle of the ocean. Who the heck are you to deprive me of that to watch some moronic video or whatever else is going on inside?
 
Old 06-02-2014, 11:49 PM
 
1,161 posts, read 1,980,875 times
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Nobody has "rights" on a plane.

That aside, the answer to the original query will vary as to the timing and location of the flight. If it's a long haul flight the airline will usually schedule a "dark" period inside the cabin so passengers can sleep. For most flights this overlaps with the night so it's not an issue one way or around. Most transatlantic flights from the US to Europe fit into this pattern, as departing flights leave in the evening/night and arrive in Europe early in the morning. Return flights usually leave Europe in the early afternoon to arrive in the US late afternoon, so once again it's not an issue as such flights won't have a designated "sleeping" period.

For other flights going to other destinations, you can have a "sleeping" period that will overlap with daylight outside. On such flights the cabin crew will ask that all shades are closed and remain closed. And yes, I've been on such flights and I've also experienced the sensation of bright light suddenly bursting into the cabin when someone opened a shade, however brief. It's not fun if you're trying to sleep.
 
Old 06-03-2014, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Kaliforneea
1,254 posts, read 946,471 times
Reputation: 2071
I get a window, just like the pilot. I would rather look out the window, see the clouds, the water, or the horizon than look at some stupid rom-com movie or Skymall catalog.

If you asked me to close mine, I would suggest that you get a little airplane blanket and put it over your head, if you didn't pack a silky black sleep mask. Or you can ask the flight attendant to switch seats. I'm sure the poor bastard next to the stinky toilet row would trade with you.

If you try to punk me by sic'ing the flight attendant on me, I might throwup on you, and blame it my vertigo and motion sickness. Because you wouldn't let me look out the window.
 
Old 06-03-2014, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,444,578 times
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This shade thing never really bothers me, and I also hate having a window seat. I feel trapped. What does bother me is people talking loudly on long overnight flights. Last week I was flying Toronto to Abu Dhabi on Etihad and some people behind me were talking about why it makes sense that women shouldn't be allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia. Double annoying when you're on a 12.5 hr flight that leaves at 10PM.
 
Old 06-03-2014, 05:19 AM
 
12,275 posts, read 18,401,528 times
Reputation: 19102
My God, how does a thread on such a benign subject as airline window shades get to 6 pages IN ONE DAY! People have too much time on there hands clearly (but here I am answering as well).

In my view there are several factors:
1.) Most of the airlines give out eye shades so a passenger has that option.
2.) It's irritating to me that the airlines shut out all lights after meals, basically two hours into the flight until almost an hour before landing. Me thinks that is there method of crowd control - turn off lights, compel the passengers to go to sleep, so that the flight attendants can sit back in the galley and read People magazine for 8 hours without interruption.
3.) On that note, I can't really sleep on the plane. Even the 12 hour flights. Nor do I like being kept in the dark like a mushroom. I need sunlight every so often into the flight. And sometimes you get beautiful sunsets or sunrises even if you can't see the ground. If you can see the ground, well perhaps you can look over long stretches of unspoiled Siberia or the Arctic.
4.) On the other hand, opening that window on a dark plane really really lights up that part of the passenger compartment. It will indeed wake people up.

So my contradictory message is that - let the window seat passenger decide, but use some discretion. Perhaps only opening it up a crack. I just flew back from China on Saturday, it was sunlight for the entire 12 hours back. I thought the OP might have been talking about me. I was the one cracking open that window shade, but it was only a crack and I tried to shield it with my head. But seeing the sunset over Kamchatka that never really set - not to be missed.
 
Old 06-03-2014, 06:13 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,505,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandman249 View Post
One thing to note is that depending on the position of the sun relative to the plane, and given the fact that the atmosphere is thin at 30,000 feet -- the sun light can be blinding.

And what are you going to see on a long haul flight that spends all it's time over water? You cannot see anything a few hours into the flight.
Well I like to still look out and its only over the ocean for four hours.
 
Old 06-03-2014, 06:15 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,505,116 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandman249 View Post
I have only seen little kids open window shades while it is dark inside and everyone is sleeping. And they are asked to close it almost immediately......
Well I will not be closing mines.

I paid to sit there, it is a day flight and I want to watch tv and look out so stuff anyone who is sleeping.

If they were at home would they sleep at that time? No!

And loads of people look out the window... Are you saying everyone sleeps on a day flight?? No, you should walk down the isle and you'll see its mostly grumpy old men sleeping.
 
Old 06-03-2014, 06:17 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,505,116 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Nothing to see? Once on a transatlantic flight, I was gazing out the window and saw another airliner going the other way, a thousand feet or so below us. I thought it was totally cool, enough so that I remember it to this day..




Is the sun in the thin atmosphere also too bright over land, forcing passengers to shut the blinds when they fly over, say, the Grand Canyon? I understand that it is an absolute truth not up for debate, but we have to debate it anyway, otherwise if we just silently accepted it, your informative post would drop off the front page of the forum and nobody would see it, which would be doing a grievous disservice to the safety and comfort of passengers..

No doubt you can give some scientific links explaining how anything in a dark plane can be too bright. If bright light is coming in, it's not dark anymore.
Yes and there are interesting cloud formations.

Some of us don't fly over the ocean much so it is nice to look out and just relax.
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