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Old 06-25-2014, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,166 posts, read 1,255,469 times
Reputation: 442

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
I have heard the Japanese are pretty good at keep their kids under control in public. There isn't any of this kids will be kids mantra. I think it's more a cultural thing here to let kids act up and just call it natural.
I go to Japan (moving there soon) and I can attest to the fact that the children are extremely well behaved everywhere they go - at least in Tokyo. Prior to my trips to Tokyo, my fiancee and I had zero plans to have a baby, but after having stayed great lengths in Tokyo we decided that maybe it isn't such a horrible thing after all. I always go to the big toy stores filled with thousands of kids in order to bring back some things for my nieces and I've never seen one misbehaving child. The problem I feel with a lot of Americans is that they have a tendency to excuse things e.g. "Boys will be boys", "kids will be kids", "it is a city so you can expect a lot of crime", etc. This is not something that certain cultures globally put up with. Also, people talking about "inside voices" in this thread amuse me, because this is distinctly different across the globe as well. What is an "Inside Voice" to an American is often screaming to another. Every time I take the train from Narita to Tokyo and back it is absolutely dead silent save the Americans in the train screaming at the top of their lungs to the point where I can recount you all their plans for the next month in great detail. Same for the public transportation. I'm soon to graduate university and go to graduate school in Japan and on my recent trip to Tokyo there were plenty of fellow students on the plane going to their home destinations of Chicago and Los Angeles. Little needs to be said other than the fact that they were obnoxiously loud the entire flight. In addition to these things, a plane full of people from Japan definitely boards a lot smoother than an intra-American flight does. That being said, I've never found flights in general to be very stressful whatsoever.

A lot of people here just do not know how to behave themselves in public. If your kid is screaming then make attempts to console it. You should try to figure out ways to be able to control your kid prior to the flight. If you can't console your child, please apologize to the people seated around you. Also, continue to try to console your child. People will respect the effort even if your child does not settle down. I realise the logic at work here: If my kid won't quieted down for anything, why should I bother to continue trying knowing that nothing will work? The point is making the gesture to show respect for those seated around you, regardless of whether or not there will be a positive result.

 
Old 06-25-2014, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Sanford, NC
1,514 posts, read 1,782,629 times
Reputation: 2453
40 pages wasted on this subject? 40 PAGES! Throw the kids in the baggage compartment and get on with the flight!

(That was a joke for the ones that don't know any better)
 
Old 06-25-2014, 12:26 PM
 
3,764 posts, read 3,501,755 times
Reputation: 8933
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I don't "hate" puppies, your position would be valid if you actually were truthful. I prefer older dogs. Nothing wrong with that.

I also don't advocate banning all children from flights. I never said that, either. In fact I've stated that I've seen well behaved children in flights as well. I do believe that for children who are incredibly disruptive, particularly when the parents either think it's cute, are oblivious, or ignore them, the airline should impose a one year ban on that child flying.
OK, you said: "Actually I'm not a big fan of puppies..." So you don't hate them, but obviously you don't like them, at least the misbehaving types, nor do you like small children, at least the misbehaving types. A person who dislikes puppies and children. Got it.
 
Old 06-25-2014, 01:12 PM
 
26,352 posts, read 24,507,802 times
Reputation: 16017
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cnote11 View Post
I go to Japan (moving there soon) and I can attest to the fact that the children are extremely well behaved everywhere they go - at least in Tokyo. Prior to my trips to Tokyo, my fiancee and I had zero plans to have a baby, but after having stayed great lengths in Tokyo we decided that maybe it isn't such a horrible thing after all. I always go to the big toy stores filled with thousands of kids in order to bring back some things for my nieces and I've never seen one misbehaving child. The problem I feel with a lot of Americans is that they have a tendency to excuse things e.g. "Boys will be boys", "kids will be kids", "it is a city so you can expect a lot of crime", etc. This is not something that certain cultures globally put up with. Also, people talking about "inside voices" in this thread amuse me, because this is distinctly different across the globe as well. What is an "Inside Voice" to an American is often screaming to another. Every time I take the train from Narita to Tokyo and back it is absolutely dead silent save the Americans in the train screaming at the top of their lungs to the point where I can recount you all their plans for the next month in great detail. Same for the public transportation. I'm soon to graduate university and go to graduate school in Japan and on my recent trip to Tokyo there were plenty of fellow students on the plane going to their home destinations of Chicago and Los Angeles. Little needs to be said other than the fact that they were obnoxiously loud the entire flight. In addition to these things, a plane full of people from Japan definitely boards a lot smoother than an intra-American flight does. That being said, I've never found flights in general to be very stressful whatsoever.

A lot of people here just do not know how to behave themselves in public. If your kid is screaming then make attempts to console it. You should try to figure out ways to be able to control your kid prior to the flight. If you can't console your child, please apologize to the people seated around you. Also, continue to try to console your child. People will respect the effort even if your child does not settle down. I realise the logic at work here: If my kid won't quieted down for anything, why should I bother to continue trying knowing that nothing will work? The point is making the gesture to show respect for those seated around you, regardless of whether or not there will be a positive result.
yes, indeed, the Japanese and most orientals take pride in raising they're kids, it is an outstanding culture in that way and always amazes me. They are tough on their kid, but let me tell you, the kids use their brains, they play music and have more scholars then Americans do....why, b/c they spank their kids when the kids are bad....and they don't stand there explaining to the kid why they shouldn't be acting like that.
 
Old 06-25-2014, 01:14 PM
 
26,352 posts, read 24,507,802 times
Reputation: 16017
Quote:
Originally Posted by blisterpeanuts View Post
OK, you said: "Actually I'm not a big fan of puppies..." So you don't hate them, but obviously you don't like them, at least the misbehaving types, nor do you like small children, at least the misbehaving types. A person who dislikes puppies and children. Got it.
I cannot stand a kid that is a brat....

and that is bad parenting....a brat once pushed my grand daughter in the pool, thank God my DIL saw it, otherwise, she would not be with us, she almost drowned.

Misbehaving types, are called brats....and it isn't their fault, it's bad parenting.
 
Old 06-25-2014, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2,483 posts, read 3,535,393 times
Reputation: 2674
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
the Japanese and most orientals...
You sound like a reasonable person so you'd probably want to know that the term "orientals" in that context is considered sort of offensive, or at least a little ignorant, by a lot of people. It's better used in reference to places or inanimate objects (like rugs), not humans.

Also, the term you probably meant to use, "asians" refers to at least 2/3 of the worlds population, and it's hard to generalize the parenting skills of 4.3 billion people.

Last edited by otterprods; 06-25-2014 at 03:04 PM..
 
Old 06-25-2014, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,662 posts, read 3,643,856 times
Reputation: 16593
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
yes, indeed, the Japanese and most orientals
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterprods View Post
You sound like a reasonable person so you'd probably want to know that the term "orientals" in that context is considered sort of offensive, or at least a little ignorant, by a lot of people. It's better used in reference to places or inanimate objects (like rugs), not humans.

Also, the term you probably meant to use, "asians" refers to at least 2/3 of the worlds population, and it's hard to generalize the parenting skills of 4.3 billion people.
Yeah, I caught on the "oriental" term as well. That's the word I used when growing up, and I never meant anything derogatory about it. Yet, for some reason, it has fallen out of favor. Now, it sounds weird to me when hearing it. The language continues to evolve . . .

But otterprods, you've hit upon the problem with the replacement term, "Asian." Taken at face value, this word should apply to anyone descended from the peoples of the continent of Asia . . . and that's a whole lot of people. There's really no logical reason why "Asian" should describe people from Japan, China, and Korea, but not from India, Turkey, or Afghanistan. And yet, that's the way it is. In American English, "Asian" is synonymous with "East Asian" and "Southeast Asian," but not "South Asian" or "West Asian" (if there even is such a thing). Kind of like how "American" means a person from the United States, but not Canada or Mexico (to say nothing of Brazil, Argentina, etc.) It's just one of those things . . .

Anyway, sorry for the digression.
 
Old 06-25-2014, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,166 posts, read 1,255,469 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
yes, indeed, the Japanese and most orientals take pride in raising they're kids, it is an outstanding culture in that way and always amazes me. They are tough on their kid, but let me tell you, the kids use their brains, they play music and have more scholars then Americans do....why, b/c they spank their kids when the kids are bad....and they don't stand there explaining to the kid why they shouldn't be acting like that.
I don't think this is necessarily true, and while I find Koreans to be generally respectful, their children seem to be more "out there" than the Japanese children from what I've experienced, and the same goes for Chinese, though not necessarily Taiwanese/Hong Kongers. They are each highly distinct cultures despite sharing many similarities. Perhaps this can be said of certain sects of IMMIGRANTS to America, but that does not generalize to the natives. Also, I can't say that a lot of Japanese people really spank their kids. Although some random guy did recently threaten some teenagers with a knife when they littered. I will say that the Japanese parents seem to teach their children why they shouldn't do something instead of simply having it be an action-discipline relationship. Instead, the children will understand WHY it is wrong and not just simply know it is wrong. Furthermore, Japanese children are burdened with a lot of responsibility. For instance, they are designated to clean up their school to the extent that they can every day instead of the school having janitors to do so (surely the reason they clean up after themselves during the World Cup matches) as well as them being tasked with serving lunch to their classmates, among a lot of other things. Then, if one person is failing in the activity, everybody takes the responsibility and NOT JUST the person who is failing. These type of schemes set up relations between people so that the children can see how hard people work to deliver them services, and in turn causes the children to respect the service they are given throughout life. This is why you will not see a lot of Japanese people wantonly destroying things because they often have a first-hand idea of how much effort it would be to clean up. People also learn the idea of group responsibility, whereby they don't want to see the group punished for their own failings, motivating them to not be lazy in social scenarios. It also works the other way, as the group will not just leave the individual behind but instead work to uplift that individual in order to accomplish the task. Everybody is important, which is why in companies a decision is passed through everybody's hands in order to gain acceptance. The idea of teenagers getting a job to learn responsibility in America essentially begins upon entering school or even before in Japan. All for the better, in my opinion, because it creates an attitude before a different one has had the chance to crystallize.
 
Old 06-25-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: S. Nevada
851 posts, read 851,738 times
Reputation: 1048
Quote:
Originally Posted by builder24car View Post
40 pages wasted on this subject? 40 PAGES! Throw the kids in the baggage compartment and get on with the flight!

(That was a joke for the ones that don't know any better)

YEAH! Um, do these come in kiddie sizes?
I'm "told" color coordinated "restraint" harnesses are also available!
I dare you! Come on, I know some of you want to pack one and wave it at some offending parents.
Beware police ossifer might be waiting for you when airplane lands.




http://chunk.ie/media/2013/07/ballgag.jpg
 
Old 06-26-2014, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
609 posts, read 636,707 times
Reputation: 770
Yes. They have to make a serious and visible effort.
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