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Old 07-04-2014, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Groveland, FL
1,279 posts, read 2,116,644 times
Reputation: 1779

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[quote=annerk;35482504]Hair dressers have licenses and are required to pay for continuing education to maintain those licenses. Many rent a chair at a salon and have to pay for all their tools and chemicals/shampoos/etc. By the time all is said and done, the cost of the haircut is mostly eaten up by their costs, and they rely on the tips for a living. Many are not paid an hourly wage, they only get a few bucks from each service from the salon owner.

Based on your logic, real estate agents should be tipped. I was responsible for continuing education to maintain my license. Many agencies charge desk fees (comparable to renting a chair in a salon), we have to pay for access to the MLS, lockboxes to put on our clients' doors, signs to put in their yards, and we have to pay the "mafia" off (National Association of Realtors, Florida Association of Realtors, and the association of realtors in our county). We also pay for gas and wear and tear on our personal vehicles to drive a client to many homes before they decide on one. Being that we work as a contractor, we may sit in an office 8-10 hours per day five or six days a week without any pay until we sell something, at which point the broker we're under takes at least half. It never dawned on me that I should have expected a tip, but using the reasoning for hair dressers, it seems I should have expected one, no?
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:41 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,577,614 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
You are right I don't go to "high end" restaurant. The higher the price, the less value you get beyond a resonable threshold (not to say the cheaper the better). The most expensive dinner I had was $160 for two, and honestly I don't think it is better than the $50-60 ones I had.

In the regular $20 restaurant I frequent, my water is refilled too. If not, I will ask for it. I don't care about if the napkins are folder - aren't you gonna unfold it later? All these "services" are nothing but to make you feel more important and elite than you really are, and it is unbelievable that people actually are willing to pay big bucks for that illusion.

And all the wine wisdom --- give me a break. I don't understand why people just keep pretending they know wines as if it were some sort of high class thing. Stripped of the lable, I doubt anyone can tell a Bordeaux from some nondescrip wine from nowhere. And you expect a 24 year old waitress with hardly a high school degree to recommend wine for you? I am sure you got a lot of expert opinions.
Some of my friends who are 24 year old's currently waiting tables are working on advanced degrees. Many have passed their sommelier test. I'm willing to pay money (it's hardly "big bucks") for a higher level of service. What I do with my money is my business.

I can tell you not only a Bordeaux from a Burg, but I can also tell you old world/new world, an approximate vintage, and the varietal or if it's a blend, at least some of the varietals in the blend. I do so regularly at blind tastings. Perhaps you don't know the first thing about wine, but don't make yourself look foolish by thinking that just because you don't, no one else does, either.
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:43 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,577,614 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
I agree with you. I've dined at many high end restaurants including famous ones. In my experience, the more famous or high end the restaurant, the more attitude the server and hostess has. They feel they are special because they are working in a popular restaurant when they are doing the same job the guy at Chilis is doing. Sorry, your'e still just a waiter, hostess or bartender.

In contrast, I have received better service at chain restaurants. The reason is the chains are managed well. They have regional and corporate managers. They have established routines and codes that employees must follow. They are required to refill drinks within so much time. They are required to check on you within so much time. The hostess is supposed to greet you and smile. Sure, it might seem a bit canned or artificial but at least you are receiving that service.

Also, if you receive bad service at a chain, there are real consequences for their actions. You can complain to corporate by going to their website and filing a complaint. The regional manager will read your complaint and address it with the local manager. This reflects poorly on the local manager and he or she will reprimand or fire that server. Even if the local manager attempts to protect the bad server, they can't in a corporate structure because the regional manager is aware of it so the local manager can't just sweep it under the rug.

In a high end or fancy restaurant, there is much more good ole boy tactics. The manager will come to your table, apologize and may offer you a free desert. Nothing will happen to the server. They have no website in which you can complain directly to the owners. The manager of this restaurant protects himself and the bad waiter. Also, in many occasions, they simply don't care if you are upset. They think they are popular and one unhappy customer is not going to hurt them.
I disagree. I have sought out the owners of many restaurants for complaints (rarely) and compliments (often) and have gotten more than one phone call or letter from the owner thanking me for getting in touch.
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:44 PM
 
10,720 posts, read 17,439,446 times
Reputation: 9920
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Actually in some restaurants, the servers are responsible for making some of the food as well.

When I worked in a restaurant years ago, the servers were responsible for making the toast/muffins/bagels, we made the served salads and cold sides. We put together the bread baskets. We sliced out all the desserts and made all the sundaes. We were responsible for keeping the salad bar filled and cleaned, same with all condiments.

I never spit in anyone's food, but I was quite tempted a few times. The low tippers were quickly identified, and believe me, I made sure my high tipping regulars got the best service, even if it meant the stiffs suffered for it.
Every server does this. When I worked as a waiter, we always assisted with little things like this but we never considered ourselves to be responsible for making this food. We would help plate items, refill condiments and put food baskets together. That isn't cooking. No one recognized that as cooking or making some of the food.

I received great tips. Occasionally, there was a cheap stiff but it didn't bother me because I received great tips from everyone else. But then again, I earned my tips. I wasn't busy socializing in the back or doing the minimum. I anticipated needs and spent most of my time on the floor checking upon my guests and anticipating what they might want in given situations before they asked. I was amazed how clueless most of my fellow waiters were with regard to this concept. I'm not surprised why a lot of waiters receive bad tips and then complain about their guests when in reality they were just bad and oblvious to that fact. I realized that most customers were reasonable including perceived cheap guests. They just wanted to be treated the way you want to be treated. It's really not hard unless you have a bad work ethic.

The waiters who tried to profile or guess what type of tipper someone would be were always the worst waiters. They were too busy worrying about getting their feelings hurt with a bad tip than doing their job. I used to hear that crap all the time. So and so is Black or Asian or Hispanic and they won't tip well so don't provide good service. I just ignored that b.s. and did my job and lo and behold they tipped me well. But the waiter who racially profiled and provided bad service got lousy tips, but of course in his or her mind, it was never their fault, it was because the guest was of a certain racial background.

Last edited by azriverfan.; 07-04-2014 at 12:57 PM..
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:45 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,577,614 times
Reputation: 13019
[quote=poodlestix;35512804]
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Hair dressers have licenses and are required to pay for continuing education to maintain those licenses. Many rent a chair at a salon and have to pay for all their tools and chemicals/shampoos/etc. By the time all is said and done, the cost of the haircut is mostly eaten up by their costs, and they rely on the tips for a living. Many are not paid an hourly wage, they only get a few bucks from each service from the salon owner.

Based on your logic, real estate agents should be tipped. I was responsible for continuing education to maintain my license. Many agencies charge desk fees (comparable to renting a chair in a salon), we have to pay for access to the MLS, lockboxes to put on our clients' doors, signs to put in their yards, and we have to pay the "mafia" off (National Association of Realtors, Florida Association of Realtors, and the association of realtors in our county). We also pay for gas and wear and tear on our personal vehicles to drive a client to many homes before they decide on one. Being that we work as a contractor, we may sit in an office 8-10 hours per day five or six days a week without any pay until we sell something, at which point the broker we're under takes at least half. It never dawned on me that I should have expected a tip, but using the reasoning for hair dressers, it seems I should have expected one, no?
You also make a $7,000 commission for selling a house--that's your share after everyone else gets theirs. Some of the Realtors I know make well into the six figures. Just like with a server, the bad ones don't last or slowly starve to death wondering what's wrong.
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Old 07-04-2014, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Groveland, FL
1,279 posts, read 2,116,644 times
Reputation: 1779
PS-I do tip hair dressers and have since I started going to them in my teens. I just couldn't help but recognize the similarities between their fees and ours.
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Old 07-04-2014, 05:47 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,577,614 times
Reputation: 13019
Quote:
Originally Posted by azriverfan. View Post
Every server does this. When I worked as a waiter, we always assisted with little things like this but we never considered ourselves to be responsible for making this food. We would help plate items, refill condiments and put food baskets together. That isn't cooking. No one recognized that as cooking or making some of the food.
It was more than just serving food though. Many people who have never worked in a restaurant think all a server does is take orders and bring out the food.

Quote:
I received great tips. Occasionally, there was a cheap stiff but it didn't bother me because I received great tips from everyone else. But then again, I earned my tips. I wasn't busy socializing in the back or doing the minimum. I anticipated needs and spent most of my time on the floor checking upon my guests and anticipating what they might want in given situations before they asked. I was amazed how clueless most of my fellow waiters were with regard to this concept. I'm not surprised why a lot of waiters receive bad tips and then complain about their guests when in reality they were just bad and oblvious to that fact. I realized that most customers were reasonable including perceived cheap guests. They just wanted to be treated the way you want to be treated. It's really not hard unless you have a bad work ethic.
You obviously didn't work near a resort town where cheap Canadians would come in, have $100 checks, and leave $1.83, or idiots that gambled away all their money at the track and then took it out on the server.

Quote:
The waiters who tried to profile or guess what type of tipper someone would be were always the worst waiters. They were too busy worrying about getting their feelings hurt with a bad tip than doing their job. I used to hear that crap all the time. So and so is Black or Asian or Hispanic and they won't tip well so don't provide good service. I just ignored that b.s. and did my job and lo and behold they tipped me well. But the waiter who racially profiled and provided bad service got lousy tips, but of course in his or her mind, it was never their fault, it was because the guest was of a certain racial background.
It's not profiling when the party came in every week and regardless of who waited on them or how good the service was, they left $1 on a $40 check.

The only ones we profiled were the French Canadians, because they never tipped and were always rude and demanding.
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Old 07-04-2014, 06:05 PM
 
18,350 posts, read 23,519,650 times
Reputation: 34397
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
Some of my friends who are 24 year old's currently waiting tables are working on advanced degrees. Many have passed their sommelier test. I'm willing to pay money (it's hardly "big bucks") for a higher level of service. What I do with my money is my business.

I can tell you not only a Bordeaux from a Burg, but I can also tell you old world/new world, an approximate vintage, and the varietal or if it's a blend, at least some of the varietals in the blend. I do so regularly at blind tastings. Perhaps you don't know the first thing about wine, but don't make yourself look foolish by thinking that just because you don't, no one else does, either.
why would you need a waitress offering wine suggestions, when you already know it all??

do you quiz them?
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Old 07-04-2014, 10:59 PM
 
Location: KYLE TEXAS
431 posts, read 397,554 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
I disagree. I have sought out the owners of many restaurants for complaints (rarely) and compliments (often) and have gotten more than one phone call or letter from the owner thanking me for getting in touch.
Write them up on yelp that will soon change the indifferance attitude.

https://www.yelp.com/login
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Old 07-05-2014, 12:05 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,370,062 times
Reputation: 2512
I resent having to tip waiters. Pay your own employees salary. Why expect your customers to do it ? Change the system.
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